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Happy-Gourmand
Thanksgiving is a time to be grateful for what have. (Photo: Contributed)
Thanksgiving is a time to be grateful for what have. (Photo: Contributed)

Turkey doesn't spell thanks

by - Story: 42379


She says:

It is not only the harvest season but also that time of year when we are reminded to give thanks for all that we have. Most of us will be enjoying a turkey feast this weekend as part of the celebrations. However, with all the news of late that seems to spell doom and gloom I wanted to take time to say that even a can of beans could serve the purpose for gathering folks together to be grateful. In our part of the world we have much to be grateful for, and if you have someone to share your meal with then that is a great start right there.

The family part of Thanksgiving is the most obvious, and although your blood relatives may be far away, often friends can fill the gap and share a special time. I know as a culture we are aware of sharing with those less fortunate as well and Thanksgiving is often a time when people are reminded to give back in any way they know how. But what about the less formal part of the holiday? What about the essence of being grateful? Can you do that if you are stressed out about work and a busy schedule and having to pay the bills?

We need to make sure we take time for ourselves, to stop and smell the flowers so to speak. That is when it is easiest to be grateful, when you take time to notice the world around you. Ambition is a powerful thing that can take you places, and responsibilities are important but we need to remember not to let the cart lead the horse. If you collapse from the stress of trying to get that never-ending list of duties completed or from the pressure of trying to live up to expectations, then you will never have a chance to really be grateful and enjoy your life – no matter how much turkey you eat.

In closing I will reprint a poem I included in an earlier column, which was made famous when it was discovered on the body of a man who was instrumental in convicting Al Capone. He was gunned down, but no one is sure if the note was something he carried or if it was left by his killers. I leave you to ponder its importance.

The Clock of Life
by Robert H. Smith, copyright 1932, 1982

The clock of life is wound but once,
And no man has the power
To tell just when the hands will stop
At late or early hour.

To lose one's wealth is sad indeed,
To lose one's health is more,
To lose one's soul is such a loss
That no man can restore.

The present only is our own,
So live, love, toil with a will,
Place no faith in "Tomorrow,"
For the Clock may then be still.


He says:

No turkey at this house! I am ba-be-cuing one last time this weekend before real cold weather takes over our beautiful sunny valley. Beef brisket is on the menu, 22 hours of slow smoking with apple, apricot, cherry and oat wood.

We invited a bunch of friends and alone people with no plans. Simple meals among friends is the best way to be thankful.

On another note, Tuesday is the big Election Day. Please go vote and keep in mind that no matter what leaders we get, the standard of living in Canada is pretty good. Yes, we have problems like poverty and crime, but if you take a look at the majority of Canadians, we have some work available, we have health care for everyone, nobody is bombing us and we are still seen by others as lucky to be living in such a beautiful country.

So pinch yourself next time you are not happy with your government… which party did what and when is irrelevant. Look around and be thankful to live here.

A big salute to our armed forces battling it out for other countries.


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About the Author

Kristin Peturson-Laprise is a customer experience specialist by trade, which means she is someone passionate about people having a good time. 

Her company, Wow Service Mentor, helps businesses enhance their customer experience through hands-on training, service programs, and special event coordination.

Kristin enjoys her own experiences too, and that is what she writes about in this column. She and her husband Martin Laprise (also known as Chef Martin, of The Chef Instead) love to share their passion for food and entertaining.  

Kristin says:

"Wikipedia lists a gourmand as a person who takes great pleasure in food. I have taken the concept of gourmandise, or enjoying something to the fullest, in all parts of my life. I love to grow and cook food, and I loved wine enough to become a Sommelier. I call a meal a success when I can convey that 'sense of place' from where the food has come . . . the French call that terroir, but I just call it the full experience. It might mean tasting the flavours of my own garden, or transporting everyone at the table to a faraway place, reminiscent of travels or dreams we have had."

 

E-mail Kristin at:  [email protected]

Check out her website here:  www.wowservicementor.com

 



The views expressed are strictly those of the author and not necessarily those of Castanet. Castanet does not warrant the contents.

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