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Canada  

'Better to love than hate'

Holocaust survivor Philip Riteman, who spent 30 years speaking to young people about his experience in concentration camps and ardently urging love over hate, has died.

Riteman's obituary said he passed away peacefully on Wednesday morning in Halifax at the age of 96.

Riteman was born in Poland and as a teenager, his family was captured by the Nazis.

He was held in numerous camps including Auschwitz, Birkenau, and Dachau until being liberated in May 1945.

Riteman then made his way to surviving relatives in Newfoundland in 1946, where he built an import trading company and eventually expanded his operations to Halifax in 1979, and later moved there.

But it wasn't until 1988 that he started speaking about his experience in the concentration camps, to counter claims that what the Nazis had done was exaggerated.

He spent the last three decades speaking to students, churches and other organizations around the world, spreading the message: "It is better to love than to hate."

"Don't you ever hate anybody. By love, you conquer the world. By hate, you'll only destroy the world and you destroy yourself," Riteman said during a tearful TED Talk in St. John's, N.L., several years ago, after showing the audience his prison number tattoo on his arm: 98706.

"I want you to remember, you should make sure it doesn't happen to you guys or your children or grandchildren. Stand up against evil, and don't you ever give away your values, your laws and order."

Riteman was a recipient of the Order of Nova Scotia and the Order of Newfoundland and Labrador, and held several honorary university doctorates.

He also wrote "Millions of Souls," which tells his story from the Second World War to his life in Canada's easternmost province, where he says he found "humanity."

Riteman was remembered Thursday as a passionate and courageous individual.

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil described Riteman as "extraordinary."

"Here's a man who saw horrors that none of us could even imagine, spent 40 years never talking about but having that horror internally, and then he begins to spread the message to audiences in this province and across the world," said McNeil on Thursday.

"A great tribute to him would be that we continue to spread his message."



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