162114
163049
Behind-the-Wheel

Telling it like it is

Commentary driving is a useful tool for teaching a new driver.

They narrate their observations, interpretations and intentions about the traffic situation as they drive.

This narrative is expected to take place before the fact and gives the instructor or examiner insight into what the driver is seeing (or not seeing) and how they intend to proceed.

These comments do not need to be made using complete sentences as long as the thought is properly conveyed. The driver should describe everything important that he sees ahead, to the sides, and in the rear view mirrors.

When there is time, he should announce the various alternatives possible and why his choice of action is best. Comments should include remarks about signs, signals, markings, hazardous situations, actions or expected actions of other road users.

From the student's point of view commentary driving assists with:

  • Building an awareness of the amount of information that a driver must process
  • Developing resistance to distraction
  • Refining judgment about how far ahead to watch and how quickly to act or react
  • Developing selective observation strategies

Benefits for the parent or instructor include the ability to assess:

  • Is the driver scanning effectively?
  • Are hazardous situations recognized early enough?
  • Does the driver follow the traffic laws and maintain proper space margins?
  • What is the driver missing that you need to train or retrain?

The current ICBC Class 5 road test requires a demonstration of commentary driving.

If you have never done this before, it is not as simple as you might think.

Remember the cognitive overload when you were first learning to drive? Introduce it after your student driver has had a chance to become somewhat familiar with operating the vehicle.

A parent should practice this before becoming the instructor as it is a valuable teaching tool. Demonstrate to the hopeful new driver how she must use her eyes, what she must see, how to interpret it, and when to act in a safe and efficient manner.

The parent will also benefit as it focuses awareness and concentration on the driving task. It may be a good personal strategy to use when you are not feeling alert or are becoming fatigued.

Story URL: https://www.drivesmartbc.ca/driver-training/commentary-driving

COMMENTS WELCOME

Comments are pre-moderated to ensure they meet our guidelines. Approval times will vary. Keep it civil, and stay on topic. If you see an inappropriate comment, please use the ‘flag’ feature. Comments are the opinions of the comment writer, not of Castanet. Comments remain open for one day after a story is published and are closed on weekends. Visit Castanet’s Forums to start or join a discussion about this story.



More Behind the Wheel articles

163465
About the Author

Tim Schewe is a retired constable with many years of traffic law enforcement experience. He has been writing his column for most of the 20 years of his service in the RCMP.

The column was 'The Beat Goes On' in Fort St. John, 'Traffic Tips' in the South Okanagan and now 'Behind the Wheel' on Vancouver Island and here on Castanet.net.

Schewe retired from the force in January of 2006, but the column has become a habit, and continues.

To comment, please email

To learn more, visit DriveSmartBC



161359
The views expressed are strictly those of the author and not necessarily those of Castanet. Castanet does not warrant the contents.

Previous Stories



162165


162463