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Behind-the-Wheel

Ignoring your own safety

When I learned to drive more than four decades ago, seat belts were becoming standard equipment on all vehicles.

Fast forward to today and we have seat belts, multiple airbags and a host of automatic systems designed to either avoid a crash or minimize the damage to us if we are in one.

Why then do some of us ignore the systems that are there for our protection?

A decade ago, seat belt use rates were about 97% for drivers of cars or light trucks in B.C. according to Transport Canada. That said, one does not have to sit for very long today watching traffic pass in urban areas to find drivers who do not buckle up.

Why ignore what is probably the simplest and most effective device in your vehicle that helps you avoid injury?

Have you read your vehicle's owners manual to learn about airbags and how they protect you in a collision?

If you have you will realize that you must wear your seatbelt to avoid injury caused by being out of place if it deploys.

You must also sit upright in your seat when the vehicle is being driven.

Yesterday, I was filling my fuel tank and watching the passenger in the vehicle beside me. She had her feet up on the dash and remained that way when her friend finished fuelling and drove away.

I shudder to think of what would happen to her if that airbag deployed.

If you buy a new vehicle today, you will find that it can be equipped with many safety systems such as automatic emergency braking and lane departure warning.

Remember that owners manual? There will be some study required to learn how they work, how you should use them and when they cannot protect you.

The sensors for these systems require regular maintenance by the driver to keep them functional. Be sure to read your owners manual or at least have the dealership demonstrate what needs to be done before you drive off the lot.

Vehicle computers store data about faults. If fault codes are stored for malfunctioning safety systems, it is conceivable that you could bear some responsibility for injuries sustained in a crash.

Ignoring these new safety systems could also place you in a bad position post collision.

Ignoring your own safety as a driver today may have many unintended consequences that can also extend to your passengers. RTFM (Refer to Factory Manual) might be the smartest (and safest) thing that you can do.

Story URL: https://www.drivesmartbc.ca/safety-equipment/ignoring-your-own-safety

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About the Author

Tim Schewe is a retired constable with many years of traffic law enforcement experience. He has been writing his column for most of the 20 years of his service in the RCMP.

The column was 'The Beat Goes On' in Fort St. John, 'Traffic Tips' in the South Okanagan and now 'Behind the Wheel' on Vancouver Island and here on Castanet.net.

Schewe retired from the force in January of 2006, but the column has become a habit, and continues.

To comment, please email

To learn more, visit DriveSmartBC



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The views expressed are strictly those of the author and not necessarily those of Castanet. Castanet does not warrant the contents.

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