148843
148549
BC  

Eyes on second barrier

The fate of a second barrier blocking access to a pipeline project became the focus of First Nations leaders in northern B.C. Wednesday as they waited to see whether the RCMP would dismantle it.

RCMP roadblocks remained in place for a third day around the territory of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation, where 14 people were arrested on Monday after police forcibly took apart a first gate blocking access to an area where Coastal GasLink wants to build a natural gas pipeline.

Sitting by a fire outside the RCMP roadblock, Alexander Joseph said the arrest of Indigenous people on their own traditional territory brought back some difficult memories.

"I come from residential (school), I come from the '60s Scoop," Joseph said. "It feels like the same thing is happening over and over again. The RCMP and the government coming in, taking us away, from our own culture, our own nature. And that's not right."

Joseph, 61, said he plans to remain at the police roadblock, which stops access to a logging road that leads to a second gate erected by the Wet'suwet'en years ago.

Joseph is a member of the Lake Babine First Nation more than 100 kilometres away, but he said he wants to show solidarity with other Indigenous people who feel threatened on their land.

"I've got so much anger right now, I want to stay here until this is resolved in a positive way," Joseph said.

The RCMP is allowing the oil and gas company's contractors to pass through the roadblock to clear trees and debris from the road.

Monday's arrests were made as the RCMP enforced a court injunction against members of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation, who had erected the first gate blocking access to the planned pipeline.

The Coastal GasLink pipeline would run through the Wet'suwet'en territory to Kitimat, where LNG Canada is building a $40-billion export facility.

TC Energy, formerly TransCanada Corp., says it has signed agreements with the elected councils of all 20 First Nations along the path, including the Wet'suwet'en.

However, members of the First Nation opposing the pipeline say the company failed to get consent from its five house chiefs, who are hereditary rather than elected. They argue the elected council only has jurisdiction over the reserve, which is a much smaller area than the 22,000 square kilometres that comprise the Wet'suwet'ens traditional territory.



More BC News

BC
149115
Vancouver Webcam
Webcam provided by webcams.travel
149342
Recent Trending
148494
Soft 103.9
148614
Castanet Proud Member of RTNDA Canada
147984



147519
149324