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Achieving-Justice

A day to remember

Another day of remembrance for dead and injured, and the multitude of others impacted, is almost upon us.

The initiative came from an international organization called RoadPeace in 1993. They conceived of a world day of remembrance for road traffic victims.

Initiators conceived of a lofty goal:

  • A day of respect by and toward all road users
  • a day on which exceptional care is taken by motorists;
  • a day of courtesy at the wheel and a day when all road laws are respected so that a world day without any crashes resulting in injury or death will become a reality.

The World Health Organization added its support in 2003. And in 2005, the United Nations provided its international endorsement, encouraging governments around the world to commemorate the day.

Canada stepped up in 2008, designating a National Day of Remembrance for Road Crash Victims on the Wednesday following the third Sunday in November.

In Kelowna, a Day of Remembrance for Road Crash Victims has been proclaimed annually since 2012. And the eighth annual commemorative event will be held Wednesday evening, Nov. 20.

The location is the Orchard Park Mall parking lot, adjacent to one of the most dangerous intersections in the Okanagan:

  • Highway 97 and Dilworth Avenue.

There is value in taking time to contemplate preventable loss. Particularly when the loss is ongoing.

Approximately 900 crashes and collisions occur every day in British Columbia. And somebody dies on British Columbia roads almost every day.

For every death, approximately 300 are injured. Many will never recover.

More Canadians have died in road traffic incidents than in both world wars combined. And the carnage continues marching forward.

If we pause to contemplate the magnitude and preventability of this ongoing loss, we might become motivated to take constructive steps to reduce it.

Clearly, out of control vehicle insurance premiums hasn’t been enough motivation.

And yes, constructive steps can be taken. This is not a problem without solutions.

A lot of work has been done to study the causes of crashes. The impact of distraction could not be clearer.

Scientific studies have concluded that “brain off the road” is the key problem. Our eyes see, but our brains fail to process, up to 50% of what’s coming at us through our windshields when engaged in a cell phone discussion.

Yet we continue with road-safety laws that permit taking your brain off the road and into a hands-free, cellphone discussion and voice to text behaviours.

We are sending drivers the wrong message. The hand-held cellphone ban is making things worse instead of better.

Please join me, others whose lives have been impacted by death and injury from road traffic incidents, representatives of fire, ambulance and police services, and other concerned citizens for the brief ceremony.

We will be gathering at 5:30 p.m. with the ceremony to begin at 6 p.m. sharp.

Among those remembering the loss of a loved one will be Hideki Mimura who lost his daughter on the Coquihalla on April 2, 2017.

She will be travelling from his home in Japan to attend this event again this year.

Please watch, and share this two-minute video about the event: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrrj77lPGZw

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About the Author

Paul Hergott began practicing law in 1995, in a general litigation practice. Of the various areas of litigation, he became most drawn to, and passionate about, pursuing fair compensation for injured victims. This gradually became his exclusive area of practice.

In 2007, Paul opened Hergott Law, a boutique personal injury law firm in the Central Interior, serving personal injury clients from all over British Columbia. Paul’s practice is restricted to acting only for the injured victim, never for ICBC or for other insurance companies.

Paul became a weekly newspaper columnist in January of 2007, when his first column entitled “It’s not about screwing the Insurance Company” was published. 

Please feel free to email or call Paul (1.855.437.4688) with legal issues you might like him to write about in his column, or to offer your feedback about something he has written.

Email:   [email protected]
Firm website:  www.hlaw.ca
Achieving Justice Legal Blog:  http://www.hlaw.ca/category/all-columns/
One Crash is Too Many Road Safety Campaign: www.onecrashistoomany.com
Google Plus:  https://plus.google.com/+HlawCanada/posts
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/personalinjurylawfirm
Twitter:   twitter.com/Hergott_Law



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The views expressed are strictly those of the author and not necessarily those of Castanet. Castanet does not warrant the contents.

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