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Canada  

May will work with minority

With three months until Canadians vote in the next federal election, Green party leader Elizabeth May says her big hope for the final result is a minority government over which she can exert some influence.

In fact, May thinks that influence could even get the Conservatives to drop their dyed-in-the-wool opposition to carbon taxes if it means the difference for them between governing or spending more time in opposition.

"People change their minds when they see the dynamic of a way a Parliament is assembled and maybe think, 'Killing carbon taxes isn't such a good idea if the only way I get to be prime minister is by keeping them,' " May says.

It would be unprecedented for the Greens to hold the balance of power at the federal level but it has happened provincially. In British Columbia, the Greens' three seats are keeping NDP Leader John Horgan's minority government in office. In New Brunswick, the minority Tory government can turn to either the Greens or the righter-wing People's Alliance for support on confidence votes.

In Prince Edward Island, the Greens formed the official Opposition after the spring vote, the best finish the party has ever had in a Canadian election.

Federally, May says she could support a minority government of any party but only if that party is serious about acting to stop climate change.

"We will negotiate with anyone, we will talk to everyone, but we won't compromise on climate action," she says.

On a multi-city, pre-campaign tour of the country that began last winter, May was found last week bumping along rural roads in Ontario south of Barrie, Ont., driven around in a Tesla owned by a local party volunteer. She won't call the events Green party rallies — they are "community matters" meetings, even though in almost the next breath she talks about how cool it is to be greeted by throngs of people waving Green signs and shouting "We love you, Elizabeth!"

Those greetings are new to her, even though this is the fourth national campaign for the 65-year-old, who in 2011 became the first Green MP elected in Canada.

She says this campaign feels very different, with a "groundswell" of support, and she is holding out hope this one won't end with Green backing collapsing on voting day as Canadians turn to parties with better chances of winning.



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