135851
132123


illicit pot, brisk business

The three surveillance cameras and the steady flow of people in and out of the small, nondescript grey building are the only hint of the brisk business this downtown Toronto cannabis dispensary does behind closed doors.

Once inside, two men behind a white desk under a vintage chandelier ask patrons to provide government identification and fill out a membership form. Then, customers are allowed to enter another room through a steel door, where an array of pot products are on display in a glass case.

When asked what has changed since Canada legalized on Oct. 17, one staffer said: "We're just busier."

Among the many shoppers on Thursday, a fourth-year university student said he preferred to buy from this dispensary to avoid the delivery problems that bedevil the provincial cannabis store. Also, he didn't want the transaction to appear in his banking records.

"It's just too much of a hassle... it's all about convenience for me," he said.

It's been nearly a month since recreational pot was legalized across Canada, and despite raids by local police departments and government warnings to illegal pot shop operators to shutter their doors or face consequences, the black market continues on.

Product shortages, delivery delays and other problems plaguing the roll-out have not helped, said Martin Landry, an analyst with GMP Securities.

"It hasn't been perfect... And probably as a result the shift away from the black market has not happened as fast as most expected. But I think that's short term."

Canada legalized cannabis for recreational use on Oct. 17 with the elimination of the black market as one of the Liberal government's main goals.

There was little expectation that it would disappear quickly, as the illicit market has survived in U.S. states like Colorado and Oregon years after legalizing recreational pot.

Statistics Canada estimates that during the fourth-quarter of this year there will be 5.4 million people wanting to purchase legal cannabis and 1.7 million continuing to buy illicit pot across Canada. Spending on pot during that period may range from $816 million to $1.1 billion while purchases of illegal cannabis may range from $254 million to $317 million, the agency estimates.

But getting users to switch from illegal sources hinges, in part, on whether the legal offering is a competitive one.

Meanwhile, in addition to limited amounts of legal pot products, cannabis-infused edibles are prohibited from sale until 2019.



More Business News

58627
134286
Data from CryptoCompare
Recent Trending
134331
Okanagan Oldies
136097
Castanet Proud Member of RTNDA Canada
135019
Press Room