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Prince Philip leaves hospital

Prince Philip was discharged Thursday from a London hospital after he was treated for an infection, Buckingham Palace said.

Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital on Tuesday as a precautionary measure after he fell ill with an infection related to an existing health condition that wasn't made public.

Philip, who turned 96 earlier this month, was driven from the hospital Thursday. Officials said he was in good spirits during his two nights' stay there.

His brief admission to the hospital meant he missed out on two major events in the queen's calendar — the state opening of Parliament on Wednesday and the Royal Ascot horse races.

In May, Philip announced he was stepping down from public life and wouldn't take on new charity roles after more than six decades of service.



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No one wants the throne

Britain's Prince Harry has suggested that no one in the royal family really wishes to rise to the throne — and that it is duty, rather than desire, that prompts them to continue serving the British people.

In an interview with Newsweek magazine, Harry said the House of Windsor is "not doing this for ourselves but for the greater good of the people."

Harry made candid remarks about being a royal — and his determination to lead as ordinary a life as he could.

"Is there any one of the royal family who wants to be king or queen? I don't think so, but we will carry out our duties at the right time," he said.

He does his own shopping, he added — and would continue to do so "even if I was king."

"People would be amazed by the ordinary life William and I live," he said.

Asked whether he worried that an "ordinary" royal would make the family "too accessible," Harry said: "It's a tricky balancing act. We don't want to dilute the magic ... The British public and the whole world need institutions like it."



2nd wildfire under control

Official reports into Portugal's deadliest natural disaster in decades have described freak conditions that drove the wildfire that killed 64 people, while Portuguese authorities said Thursday they have contained a second fire that raged for five days close by.

More than 2,000 firefighters and some two dozen water-dropping aircraft fought the two fires for days and nights amid strong winds and temperatures above 40 C.

Several official investigations are assessing the disaster response, including why 47 of the deaths on Saturday night occurred on a country road as people fleeing the flames in their cars were engulfed by the blaze.

In an initial report, the Portuguese weather agency IPMA said a "downburst" of wind sprayed embers across a broad area.

On Monday, the head of the national judicial police said a lightning strike is believed to have sparked the blaze after investigators found a tree that was struck.



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6.8 quake off Guatemala

The U.S. Geological Survey says a magnitude 6.8 earthquake has hit off Guatemala's Pacific coast.

Residents of Guatemala City report feeling the 6:31 a.m. quake, but there are no immediate reports of what damage it may have caused.

The Geological Survey says the quake was centred about 38 kilometres southwest of Puerto San Jose and 10 kilometres below the surface.



IS destroys ancient mosque

The Islamic State group blew up a historic landmark in Iraq — Mosul's famed 12th century al-Nuri mosque with its iconic leaning minaret known as al-Hadba, from where the IS leader proclaimed the militant group's self-styled caliphate nearly three years ago.

The explosion destroyed another piece of priceless Iraqi cultural heritage.

Iraq's Ministry of Defence said the militants detonated explosives planted inside the structures on Wednesday night. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi tweeted early on Thursday that the destruction was an admission by the militants that they are losing the fight for Iraq's second-largest city.

"It is a shock, a real big shock," Amir al-Jumaili, a professor at the Archaeology College in Mosul told The Associated Press.

The IS blew up the mosque during the celebrations of Laylat al Qadr, the holiest night of the year for Muslims. The "Night of Power" commemorates the night the Qur’an was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, which is now underway.



Church 'colluded' on abuse

The Church of England "colluded" with and helped to hide the long-term sexual abuse of young men by one of its former bishops, the head of the church said Thursday.

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby apologized to the victims who spoke out and helped bring ex-bishop Peter Ball to justice as the church published a detailed report into how it handled the case.

Welby ordered the report after Ball was convicted and imprisoned in 2015 for misconduct in public office and indecent assaults against teenagers and young men over a period of 20 years. Ball, who admitted to abusing 18 people, was released after serving 16 months.

The report said Ball's conduct "caused serious and enduring damage to the lives of many men," and that "the church at its most senior levels and over many years supported him unwisely."

Describing the report as "harrowing reading," Welby said: "The church colluded and concealed rather than seeking to help those who were brave enough to come forward."



Heat fuels Southwest fires

An extreme heat wave in the Southwest U.S. made the fight against a series of wildfires more difficult Wednesday, including one that has destroyed at least four homes in an Arizona town known for its wineries, authorities said.

Temperatures in parts of Arizona, California and Nevada soared to nearly 49 C this week, creating problems for firefighters. In California, two firefighters were treated for heat-related injuries as they battled a blaze in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles.

In New Mexico, authorities say a brush fire destroyed sheds and vehicles on private property and sent two residents and a firefighter to the hospital for smoke inhalation and other minor injuries.

In Arizona, about 100 firefighters battled a five square kilometre blaze believed to have been ignited by lightning Tuesday in triple-digit temperatures in Sonoita. None of the wineries dotting the area was threatened.

Evacuations were lifted Wednesday evening after rainfall helped control the fire.

Firefighters across Arizona are battling about 30 blazes, making resources scarce, De Wolf said. He said he was asking Gov. Doug Ducey to help cover the financial costs of battling the fire.

Fires are burning throughout the Southwest, including one in Utah that forced the evacuation of more than 700 people and shut down part of a state highway.



Mauling bear killed

Alaska wildlife officials say a black bear believed to have mauled a 16-year-old to death during a weekend mountain race has been shot and killed along with three other black bears.

State Fish and Game officials say the bear was killed Tuesday evening in the area south of Anchorage. The bear is believed responsible for the Sunday death of Patrick Cooper of Anchorage.

The three other bears were shot near the site of the mauling.

The teen was attacked after he got lost and veered off the trail during the juniors division of the Robert Spurr Memorial Hill Climb race.

The boy's body was found about at about 1,500 vertical feet, with the bear guarding the body. A park ranger shot the animal, but it ran away.



What's for dinner? Roadkill

Some folks in Oregon might not want to ask, when served an elk burger or a venison steak, where the meat came from. Under a roadkill bill passed overwhelmingly by the Legislature and signed by the governor, motorists who crash into the animals can now harvest the meat to eat.

And it's not as unusual as people might think. About 20 other states also allow people to take meat from animals killed by vehicles. Aficionados say roadkill can be high-quality, grass-fed grub.

"Eating roadkill is healthier for the consumer than meat laden with antibiotics, hormones and growth stimulants, as most meat is today," noted People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA.

"We are at or near the top of the list. We have a lot of roads and a lot of deer," said Travis Lau, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Game Commission, though he added the total number was uncertain.



Murders spike in Mexico

May was Mexico's bloodiest month in at least 20 years, and homicides are up sharply in 2017 compared with last year, new government crime statistics show.

Statistics published Tuesday by the Interior Department said 2,186 people were murdered last month. The previous monthly high was 2,131 in May 2011, according to a review of publicly available records that date back to 1997.

During the first five months of 2017, there were 9,916 killings nationwide — an increase of about 30 per cent over the 7,638 slain during the same period last year.

Mexico launched a militarized offensive over a decade ago to combat drug cartels that plague parts of the country. Homicides fell somewhat after peaking in 2011 but have risen again.

At the state level, Baja California Sur saw the biggest jump in the first five months of 2017. After registering 36 killings during the same period in 2016, that spiked by 369 per cent to 169 this year. There were also significant increases in Veracruz (93 per cent), Quintana Roo (89 per cent) and Sinaloa (76 per cent).



Cdn behind airport attack

A Canadian man shouted in Arabic before stabbing a police officer in the neck at the Flint, Mich., airport on Wednesday, and referenced people being killed overseas during the attack that's now being investigated as an act of terrorism, federal officials said.

Amor Ftouhi, 49, of Quebec, was immediately taken into custody. A criminal complaint charging him with committing violence at an airport says Ftouhi asked an officer who subdued him why the officer didn't kill him.

The attack is being investigated as an act of terrorism, but authorities have no indication at this time that he was involved in a "wider plot," said FBI Special Agent in Charge David Gelios.

"At this time, we view him as a lone-wolf attacker," Gelios said. "We have no information to suggest any training."

The criminal complaint says Ftouhi stabbed Lt. Jeff Neville with a large knife after yelling "Allahu akbar," the Arabic phrase for "God is great." According to the FBI, Ftouhi said something similar to "you have killed people in Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan, and we are all going to die."

Neville was in satisfactory condition after initially being in critical condition, airport police Chief Chris Miller said at a late afternoon news conference where the charges were announced.

Gelios said Ftouhi legally entered the U.S. at Champlain, N.Y., on June 16.

Ftouhi spent some time in public, unsecured areas of the airport before going to a restroom where he dropped two bags before attacking the officer with a 12-inch knife that had an 8-inch serrated blade, Gelios said.



Flint airport evacuated

Officials on Wednesday evacuated an airport in Flint, Michigan, where a witness said he saw an officer bleeding from his neck and a knife nearby on the ground.

On Twitter, Michigan State Police say the officer is in critical condition and the FBI was leading the investigation.

Bishop International Airport posted on Facebook that passengers were safe and were being told to check for flight delays or cancellations.

Ken Brown tells The Flint Journal he was dropping off his daughter at the airport and saw the officer bleeding from his neck. He says he saw a man detained by police and a knife on the ground.

"The cop was on his hands and knees bleeding from his neck," Brown said. "I said they need to get him a towel."

Cherie Carpenter, who was awaiting a flight to Texas to see her new grandchild, tells Flint TV station WJRT she saw the attacker being led away in handcuffs. She described the man in custody as appearing "blank, just totally blank."



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