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Arthur cartoon too risque

Alabama Public Television has chosen not to air an episode of the PBS children's show "Arthur" because it included a same-sex wedding.

The episode "Mr. Ratburn and the Special Someone" aired nationally on May 13, showing Arthur attending the wedding of his teacher and partner.

APT showed a re-run instead.

AL.com reports that APT director of programming Mike Mckenzie defended the decision by saying parents trust that their children can watch the station without supervision.

The station had previously pulled an episode of "Arthur" in 2005 when a character had two mothers.

Misty Souder, a substitute teacher from McCalla, Alabama, says she's disappointed. She says she's using this to teach her 9-year-old daughter about the importance of standing up for minority groups.



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Knife-wielding man shot

Authorities say a man was shot outside of a South Dakota jail after he charged at officers with a knife.

Minnehaha County Sheriff Mike Milstead says authorities responded to gunshots just after 3 p.m. Tuesday.

Milstead says a deputy fired two shots, and at least one hit the 44-year-old suspect.

Jail Warden Jeff Gromer says a man holding a glass bottle approached the jail lobby and was hitting the bottle against the lobby window when security asked for police help.

Gromer says the men threw either a rock or the bottle through the jail door, injuring one officer with broken glass. Gromer says the man charged officers with a knife and was shot.

The man was taken to a hospital. The Argus Leader reports the courthouse and the jail were put on lockdown.



Brad, Leo and Quentin

Twenty-five years after premiering "Pulp Fiction" in Cannes, Quentin Tarantino returned to the French film festival with neither great vengeance nor furious anger but a gentler fairy tale about 1960s Los Angeles.

"Once Upon a Time In ... Hollywood" made its much-anticipated debut Tuesday in Cannes, giving the festival its most concentrated splash of celebrity and frenzy. The film's two stars, Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio, brought a fittingly old-school Hollywood glamour to the Cannes red carpet, where throngs of onlookers swelled along the Croisette.

Much of the plot of "Once Upon a Time In ... Hollywood" had been carefully kept under wraps leading up to the premiere. DiCaprio plays a Westerns actor anxious that his notoriety is slipping. Pitt plays his stunt double, friend and, because of a drunk driving offence, his driver. Though set against the backdrop of the Manson Family murders, much of Tarantino's film is invested in recapturing the radiance of a bygone Hollywood.

For a filmmaker often associated with blistering dialogue and ecstatic explosions of violence, "One Upon a Time in ... Hollywood" finds the 56-year-old Tarantino working at a more relaxed pace, spending generous amounts of time in odes to spaghetti Westerns and '60s TV shows.

Ahead of the premiere, Tarantino issued a statement to festival audiences imploring them not to spoil the film for future moviegoers — a request repeated before the film's press screening. Journalists lined up hours in advance.

"Once Upon a Time in ... Hollywood" is Tarantino's first movie not being released by Harvey Weinstein. After Tarantino cut ties with the disgraced mogul, the project attracted the interest of most studios. Sony Pictures landed the film and gave it a $95 million budget — a now incredibly rare gamble on a high-priced original movie.

Instead of superheroes or intellectual property, "Once Upon a Time in ... Hollywood" will instead bank on the draw of Tarantino and his two movie stars. Margot Robbie also co-stars as Sharon Tate.

"Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood" will be released in U.S. theatres July 26.



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California suing for $1B

California sued Tuesday to block the Trump administration from cancelling nearly $1 billion for the state's high-speed rail project, escalating the state's feud with the federal government.

The Federal Railroad Administration announced last week it would not give California the money awarded by Congress nearly a decade ago, arguing that the state has not made enough progress on the project.

The state must complete construction on a segment of track in the Central Valley agricultural heartland by 2022 to keep the money, and the administration has argued the state cannot meet that deadline. That line of track would be the first built on what the state hopes will eventually become a 520-mile (837-kilometre) line between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

But Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom says the move is retribution for California's criticism of President Donald Trump's immigration policies.

"The decision was precipitated by President Trump's overt hostility to California, its challenge to his border wall initiatives, and what he called the "green disaster" high-speed rail project," the state said in the lawsuit.

California was not expected to tap the $929 million the Trump administration has revoked until 2021. If the lawsuit is not resolved before then, the election could put Democrats in the White House and Congress who may be friendlier to the project.

The lawsuit faulted the Trump administration for halting co-operation with the state on granting environmental clearances for the project. It said terminating the funding would "wreak significant economic damage on the Central Valley and the state."

Newsom told reporters the administration is "after us in every way, shape or form." But he expressed confidence the state will win in court.

"Principles and values tend to win out over short-term tweets," Newsom said.

The lawsuit highlighted a series of tweets Trump sent about the project, including one that said California's rail project would be far more expensive than Trump's proposed border wall.

That tweet came a day after California led 15 states in suing over Trump's plans to fund the border wall, and hours before the administration first threatened to revoke the rail funding.

The Federal Railroad Administration did not immediately respond to an email message seeking comment about California's lawsuit.

California has worked for more than a decade on the project to bring high-speed rail service between Los Angeles and San Francisco, but the project has been plagued by delays and cost overruns. It's now projected to cost around $77 billion and be finished by 2033.

The state has already spent $2.5 billion in federal funding, and the Trump administration is exploring whether it can try to get that money back.

The lawsuit also asks the court to block the administration from awarding the money to any other project.

The lawsuit was filed in the Northern District of California.

The dispute over the funding was partly driven by Newsom's remarks in February that the project faced challenges and needed to shift focus. Rail officials had been planning to connect the line under construction in the Central Valley to Silicon Valley, but Newsom has proposed extending the line further north and south into the valley before heading west.



Oregon hunts for bodies

Oregon will use ground-penetrating radar to search for bodies buried on the campus of a now-defunct psychiatric hospital where the movie "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" was filmed before a developer builds housing on the land.

The facility, which opened in 1883, once had a cemetery, but all the 1,500 bodies buried there should have been exhumed in 1913, the Statesman Journal reported Tuesday.

There is no evidence any remains were left behind, but the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde is asking the state to make sure before apartments and single-family homes are built on Oregon State Hospital's North Campus.

The psychiatric hospital has a troubled history, including the discovery of 5,000 unclaimed sets of cremated remains that belonged to patients who died over a span of decades.

Briece Edwards, who manages historic preservation for the tribes, pointed to an inconsistent record of tracking cemeteries at state institutions, namely hospitals, orphanages and prisons. He called it a nationwide issue.

"Sometimes records are spotty," Edwards said. The tribes wanted to ensure officials did their due diligence, he said.

Cemeteries also don't always stay within their borders, he said.

"It's not so much about confirming where the cemetery is, it's about confirming where it isn't," Edwards told the newspaper.

The Department of Administrative Services, which owns the land, is hiring a contractor to do the search.

The state also will search the historical record for information about the exhumations and the cremated remains from the facility, department spokeswoman Elizabeth Craig said.

Opened 136 years ago as the Oregon State Insane Asylum, the hospital had a cemetery for 30 years. It closed in the early 1910s and state lawmakers ordered the remains exhumed in 1913, when the facility was renamed the Oregon State Hospital.

More than 1,500 people were buried in the cemetery, the newspaper has previously reported, ranging in age from children to older adults. Bodies that went unclaimed were supposed to be cremated.

State Senate President Peter Courtney discovered a room of thousands of metal urns of unclaimed cremated remains stacked on wooden shelves during a tour of the hospital in 2004.

They belong to people who died while living or working at the hospital and five other hospitals or state penitentiaries between 1914 and 1973, according to the Oregon Health Authority website.

It's unclear if any of the people believed to have been buried in the hospital's cemetery are in the discovered urns. In 2011, state researchers used records to try to match urns with families, but none matched with the cemetery's burial records.

The state maintains an online list of the 2,972 cremated remains that have not been claimed for families to search.

The psychiatric hospital was used as a film set for "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," an Oscar-winning movie starring Jack Nicholson based on a novel by Ken Kesey.



Terror charges in shootings

New Zealand police on Tuesday filed a terrorism charge against the man accused of killing 51 people at two Christchurch mosques.

Australian Brenton Harrison Tarrant, 28, was already facing murder and attempted murder charges from the March 15 shootings.

The new charge comes with a maximum penalty of life imprisonment upon conviction and will be a test case for New Zealand's terrorism law, which came onto the books in 2002 following the terrorist attacks in the U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001.

The New Zealand law defines terrorism as including acts that are carried out to advance an ideological, political, or religious cause with the intention of inducing terror in a civilian population.

Just before the attacks, Tarrant emailed New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and others a manifesto outlining his white supremacist beliefs and his detailed plans for the shootings.

From the outset, Ardern has described the attacks as terrorism.

Police Commissioner Mike Bush said in a statement they wouldn't be commenting on the new charges as the case was before the courts.

A judge last month ordered that Tarrant undergo mental health assessments to determine if he's fit to stand trial.

His next court hearing has been scheduled for June 14, and the mental health findings could determine whether he is required to enter a plea at that point.

Police also said Tuesday they had charged Tarrant with an additional count of murder, bringing the total number of murder charges against him to 51. That came after a Turkish man who was wounded in the attack died earlier this month in Christchurch Hospital.

Police also increased the number of attempted murder charges against Tarrant from 39 to 40.

Aside from those who died, at least 47 other people were treated at hospitals for gunshot wounds.



5th migrant child dies

A 16-year-old Guatemala migrant who died Monday in U.S. custody had been held by immigration authorities for six days — twice as long as federal law generally permits — then transferred to another holding facility even after he was diagnosed with the flu.

The teenager, identified by U.S. Customs and Border Protection as Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez, was the fifth minor from Guatemala to die after being apprehended by U.S. border agents since December.

Advocates demanded that President Donald Trump's administration act to safeguard the lives of children in detention as border crossings surge and the U.S. Border Patrol detains thousands of families at a time in overcrowded facilities, tents, and outdoor spaces.

"We should all be outraged and demand that those responsible for his well-being be held accountable," said Efrén Olivares, a lawyer with the Texas Civil Rights Project.

"If these were white children that were dying at this rate, people would be up in arms," he said. "We see this callous disregard for brown, Spanish-speaking children."

John Sanders, CBP's acting commissioner, said in a statement that his agency was "saddened by the tragic loss of this young man and our condolences are with his family."

"CBP is committed to the health, safety and humane treatment of those in our custody," Sanders said.

Border Patrol agents said Carlos was apprehended on May 13 in South Texas' Rio Grande Valley after crossing the border illegally. He was taken to the agency's central processing centre in McAllen, Texas, a converted warehouse where hundreds of adults and children are held in large, fenced-in pens and sleep on mats.

CBP said Carlos was processed as a minor unaccompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Federal law and CBP's guidelines generally require that unaccompanied youth be transferred within three days to a facility operated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A CBP official who declined to be named in order to brief reporters said Carlos was awaiting transfer to HHS custody on Thursday, three days after his apprehension. At the time of his death, Carlos was supposed to be sent to Southwest Key Casa Padre, a 1,400-person facility inside an old Walmart in Brownsville, Texas, the official said.

Mark Weber, a spokesman for HHS, did not address in a statement why the teenager wasn't transferred sooner, but said a "minority of cases exceeding 72 hours have generally involved exceptional circumstances."

CBP said Carlos reported early Sunday morning that he was not feeling well and diagnosed with the flu by a nurse practitioner.

He was prescribed the medicine Tamiflu, then transferred later Sunday to the Border Patrol station at Weslaco, Texas, to prevent his flu from spreading to other detainees.

He was not hospitalized, according to the agency official who briefed reporters. The official said CBP facilities have medical providers who can monitor detainees, though the official did not know what specific symptoms Carlos had.

Carlos had last been checked an hour before he was found unresponsive.



Dramatic start to presidency

Ukraine's new president, a comedian before he turned to statecraft, made a dramatic entrance to the political stage Monday, disbanding parliament minutes after his inauguration.

Volodymyr Zelenskiy, who won 73% of the vote last month, justified his contentious decision on the grounds that the legislature, controlled by allies of the man he defeated, is riddled with self-enrichment.

Elections to the Supreme Rada were scheduled for Oct. 27, which raised the prospect of Zelenskiy struggling to enact his agenda in the face of a hostile parliament over his first few months in power.

A snap parliamentary election will be held within two months of his signing a formal dissolution decree.

Zelenskiy, a comedian who played the role of a Ukrainian president on a popular TV show for years, is gambling that his popularity will see the next parliament dominated by supporters of his agenda to reform Ukraine and steer a new path with Russia.

Zelenskiy said Ukrainian politics for the past quarter-century created "opportunities for kickbacks, money laundering and corruption."

Zelenskiy's efforts follow repeated attempts by the majority in the current parliament to stymie his campaign promise for a new election.

Since last month's election, Zelenskiy's opponents in the Rada sought to put off the inauguration close to the May 27 deadline by which the parliament can be dissolved.

And in a dramatic move last week, the Rada announced the collapse of the ruling parliamentary coalition. According to parliamentary rules, the chamber can't be dissolved for 30 days after the governing coalition has been disbanded.

Zelenskiy's supporters argue that the Rada's actions are legally void because the coalition had long ceased to exist and that the Ukrainian Constitution, unlike the Rada regulations, doesn't contain such a rule.

Volodymyr Fesenko, head of the Kyiv-based think-tank Penta, said Zelenskiy's announcement shows "political will for radical change."

"The legally dubious decision to disband parliament will certainly be contested in court but Zelenskiy has shown that it is going to be him who will lay down the agenda and that he will dominate the political landscape," he said.

Zelenskiy's landslide victory reflected Ukrainians' exhaustion with widespread corruption and the country's political elite. Before disbanding parliament, the 41-year-old Zelenskiy upended other Ukrainian political traditions on inauguration day.

He ditched the idea of a traditional motorcade to his inauguration, walking to the parliament in Kyiv through a park packed with people. Flanked by four bodyguards, the beaming president-elect gave high-fives to some spectators, even stopping to take a selfie with one of them.

At the end of his swearing-in ceremony, Zelenskiy asked the Supreme Rada to adopt a bill against illegal enrichment and support his motions to fire the country's defence minister, the head of the Ukrainian Security Service (SBU) and the Prosecutor General. All are allies of Zelenskiy's predecessor, Petro Poroshenko.

That's when he dropped his bombshell about dissolving parliament. Zelenskiy told lawmakers they only have a few weeks to support his motions, as that's as long as the current parliament has.



Judge rules against Trump

A federal judge in Washington ruled Monday against President Donald Trump in a financial records dispute with Congress.

U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta, who was appointed by President Barack Obama, said Trump cannot block a House subpoena of financial records. He said the Democratic-led House committee seeking the information has said it believes the documents would help lawmakers consider strengthening ethics and disclosure laws, among other things.

The committee's reasons were "valid legislative purposes," Mehta said, and it was not for him "to question whether the Committee's actions are truly motivated by political considerations."

The decision comes amid a widespread effort by the White House and the president's lawyers to refuse to co-operate with congressional requests for information and records.

In the case before Mehta, Trump and his business organization sued to block the subpoena issued in April to Mazars USA, an accountant for the president and Trump Organization. Trump's lawyers accused Democrats of harassing Trump and said the subpoena "has no legitimate legislative purpose."

Trump's lawyers, in suing in both Washington and New York in attempt to beat back congressional subpoenas, said congressional investigations are legitimate only if there is legislation that might result from them.

In the New York case, Trump, his business and family have sued Deutsche Bank and Capital One to prevent the financial companies from complying with subpoenas from the House Financial Services Committee and the House Intelligence Committee for banking and financial records. A Wednesday hearing is planned in that case.

Even before the ruling, scholars had said Trump's legal argument had little merit and that Congress has broad powers to investigate.



Rape trial on for ex-NFLer

Kellen Winslow Jr., a former NFL No. 1 draft pick and son of a Hall of Famer who starred for his hometown San Diego Chargers, goes on trial Monday on multiple charges, including raping two women last year and the 2003 rape of an unconscious 17-year-old girl.

The 35-year-old was once the highest-paid tight end in the NFL but saw his career sidetracked by injuries. He could face life in prison if convicted.

Winslow has pleaded not guilty to all the charges, totalling 12 counts. Five women are listed as victims in the complaint that also includes allegations of lewd conduct and indecent exposure.

His attorney, Brian Watkins, said in an email to The Associated Press that "we look forward to vindicating Mr. Winslow."

Winslow was initially arrested in 2018 after authorities said they found ties to him and two alleged break-ins at the home of a 71-year-old woman on June 1 and an 86-year-old woman on June 7 in the Pacific beach town of Encinitas, north of San Diego.

After posting bail, he was arrested again on the additional charges of raping two women, a 54-year-old female in March of 2018 and a 59-year-old female in May of 2018. Both women were attacked in Encinitas. He is accused of kidnapping the 54-year-old.

Also in May of 2018, a 57-year-old woman accused Winslow of exposing himself to her. Another woman stepped forward to say she had been attacked by him when she was 17, according to the investigation.

While Winslow was out on $2 million bail, he was arrested for lewd conduct in front of a 77-year-old woman at a gym on two separate occasions in February of this year. He has been jailed since without bail.

Prosecutors have said he appeared to target middle-aged and elderly women.

Winslow is the son of Hall of Famer Kellen Winslow.

The former University of Miami star had 469 catches for 5,236 yards and 25 touchdowns in 105 games.

Drafted No. 6 overall by Cleveland, he broke his right leg in his rookie season, then sustained a serious right knee injury in a motorcycle accident that off-season.

From 2004 to 2013, he played for Cleveland, Tampa Bay, New England and the New York Jets.

He was suspended in 2013 with the Jets for violating the league's performance-enhancing drug policy.

That same year, he was arrested after a woman told police she saw him masturbating in a parked car outside of a New Jersey department store. Winslow was arrested for possession of synthetic marijuana, and the charge was dropped after he completed court-ordered terms.



Forgot newborn in taxi

New parents got the fright of their lives in Germany after accidentally forgetting their newborn in the taxi taking them home from hospital.

Hamburg police said Monday that the couple took the baby's one-year-old sibling out of the car, paid the driver and said goodbye — then realized someone was missing as the taxi pulled away.

Dad's attempt to catch the cab on foot failed and the driver, unaware of his sleeping stowaway, parked the taxi in an underground garage to go for lunch.

It wasn't until the driver picked up a fare at the airport that the underage passenger made its presence known.

The driver swiftly called police and after a quick check-up from an ambulance crew the baby and its grateful parents were reunited.



Stripped of Google services?

Huawei could lose its grip on the No. 2 ranking in worldwide cellphone sales after Google announced it would comply with U.S. government restrictions meant to punish the Chinese tech powerhouse.

The Trump administration move, which effectively bars U.S. firms from selling components and software to Huawei, ups the ante in a trade war between Washington and Beijing that partly reflects a struggle for global economic and technological dominance.

Google said basic services would still function on the Android operating system used in Huawei's smartphones and existing smartphone owners would not lose access to its Google Play app store or security features.

But unless the U.S. Commerce Department grants exceptions, the ban announced last week on all purchases of U.S. technology would badly hurt Huawei, analyst say.

Washington claims Huawei poses a national security threat, and its placement on the so-called Entity List by the Trump administration last week is widely seen as intended to persuade resistant U.S. allies in Europe to exclude Huawei equipment from their next-generation wireless networks, known as 5G.

"This is major crisis for Huawei. Instead of being the world's largest handset manufacturer this year, it will struggle to stay two, but probably fall behind," analyst Roger Entner said. "How competitive is a smartphone without the most well-known and popular apps?"

Huawei will likely use its own, stripped-down version of Android, whose basic code is provided free of charge by Google. But it's not yet clear what other Google software and services — such as maps, Gmail or search — it will be able to use.

Entner, founder of Recon Analytics, said Google itself won't have a large direct impact, "as consumers will shift to other Android devices. The biggest concern is not to be caught in the crossfire of two governments."

Gartner analyst Tuong Nguyen said 48% of Huawei's phone shipments last year were outside of China and the company will need to scramble not to lose market share.

Samsung led global smartphone sales in the first quarter of this year with a 23.1% share. Huawei was second with 19%, followed by Apple at 11.7%, according to IDC.

Huawei's smartphone sales in the U.S. are tiny — and the Chinese company's footprint in telecommunications networks is limited to smaller wireless and internet providers— so any impact on U.S. consumers of a Google services cutoff would be slight.

Hardware suppliers led by Qualcomm, Broadcom and Intel would also be forced to halt shipments to Huawei under the Commerce Department rule, which requires all U.S. technology sales to the company to obtain U.S. government approval unless exceptions are made.

The global risk assessment outfit Eurasia Group said the Commerce Department was expected to set a 90-day grace period this week. Department officials did not immediately return phone calls and emails seeking comment.

In a report, Eurasia Group said that if the Commerce Department sanction process helps persuade European carriers to shun Huawei equipment, a full ban on purchases of U.S. technology products and services could be avoided.

Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc., said in a statement late Sunday that it was complying with and "reviewing the implications" of the requirement for export licenses for technology sales to Huawei, which took effect Thursday.

"For users of our services, Google Play and the security protections from Google Play Protect will continue to function on existing Huawei devices," it added.

Google did not immediately respond to questions about whether it planned to request Commerce Department approval to be able to continue to provide Huawei with the value-added services and apps that have made Android the world's most popular mobile operating system.

Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight, said it's unclear what Google has told Huawei, but any disruption in getting updates to software would have "considerable implications" for its consumer device business.

The U.S. government says Chinese suppliers including Huawei and its smaller rival, ZTE Corp., pose an espionage threat because they are beholden to China's ruling Communist Party. But American officials have presented no evidence of any Huawei equipment serving as intentional conduits for espionage by Beijing.

Huawei, headquartered in the southern city of Shenzhen near Hong Kong, reported earlier that its worldwide sales rose 19.5% last year over 2017 to 721.2 billion ($105.2 billion). Profit rose 25.1% to 59.3 billion yuan ($8.6 billion).

Huawei smartphone shipments rose 50% in the first three months of 2019 to 59.1 million, compared with a year earlier, while the global industry's total fell 6.6%, according to IDC. Shipments from Samsung and Apple both declined.

Huawei defended itself Monday as "one of Android's key global partners." The company said it helped to develop a system that "benefited both users and the industry."

"We will continue to build a safe and sustainable software ecosystem, in order to provide the best experience for all users globally," the company said.

A foreign ministry spokesman, Lu Kang, said China will "monitor the development of the situation" but gave no indication how Beijing might respond.

The U.S. order took effect Thursday and requires government approval for all purchases of American microchips, software and other components globally by Huawei and 68 affiliated businesses. Huawei says that amounted to $11 billion in goods last year.

That could certainly create some collateral damage for U.S. companies.

The California chipmaker Xilinx Inc. tumbled 4% Monday. David Wong, an analyst with Nomura, said Xilinx has benefited from demand in next-generation, 5G technologies and "action against a major maker of communications infrastructure equipment like Huawei likely poses risk for Xilinx."



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