54889
55592

World  

Meghan Markle makes mark

Kensington Palace has given details of the newly created Coat of Arms for the former Meghan Markle — an honour which is accorded by tradition to the nobility.

The Coat of Arms for the Duchess of Sussex, as she is now formally known, includes symbols that invoke the former actress' background and look to her future.

It features a blue background that represents the Pacific Ocean and golden rays of sunshine reminiscent of California, her home state in America. The shield includes three quills representing the power of words — a nod to her former website, which was used as a forum to discuss social issues.

A collection of golden poppies, California's state flower, sit on the grass beneath the shield together with wintersweet, which grows at Kensington Palace.



56057


Civilians kill gunman

Three people were shot and wounded at an Oklahoma City restaurant and one person was injured while fleeing before the gunman was shot dead by two armed citizens, police said Friday.

Police released a statement alleging that 28-year-old Alexander Tilghman opened fire inside Louie's On The Lake around 6:30 p.m. Thursday, wounding a 39-year-old woman and two juvenile girls. An unnamed man fell and broke his arm while fleeing.

Tilghman was then shot dead outside the restaurant by two citizens identified by police as Carlos Nazario and Bryan Wittle. A suspected motive for the shooting hasn't been released.

All four victims are reported in good condition, according to Oklahoma City police Capt. Bo Mathews.

Dennis Will said two of the shot victims are his daughter and granddaughter. Talking with reporters outside the hospital where the shooting victims were taken, Will said his daughter called him after the shooting and said they had been shot while entering the restaurant for a birthday dinner.

The Hal Smith Restaurant Group, which owns the restaurant, released a statement saying the restaurant will be closed Friday and counsellors will be available to employees and customers.



Summit talk turns warmer

President Donald Trump on Friday warmly welcomed North Korea's promising response to his abrupt withdrawal from the potentially historic Singapore summit and said "we're talking to them now" about putting it back on track.

"Everybody plays games," said Trump, who often boasts about his own negotiating tactics and skill.

The president, commenting as he left the White House for a commencement speech, said it was even possible the summit could take place on the originally planned June 12 date.

"They very much want to do it, we'd like to do it," he said.

Earlier Friday, in a tweet, he had called the North's reaction to his letter cancelling the summit "warm and productive." That was far different from his letter Thursday to North Korea leader Kim Jong Un, blaming "tremendous anger and open hostility" by Pyongyang for the U.S. withdrawal.

The tone from both sides was warmer on Friday. First, North Korea issued a statement saying it was still "willing to give the U.S. time and opportunities" to reconsider talks "at any time, at any format."

Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan called Trump's withdrawal "unexpected" and "very regrettable," and said the cancellation of the talks showed "how grave the status of historically deep-rooted hostile North Korea-U.S. relations is and how urgently a summit should be realized to improve ties."

Then Trump, in his response to that response, said it was "very good news," and "we will soon see where it will lead, hopefully to long and enduring prosperity and peace. Only time (and talent) will tell!"

The president's surprise exit from the planned talks on Thursday had capped weeks of high-stakes brinkmanship between the two unpredictable leaders over nuclear negotiating terms for their unprecedented sit-down. The U.S. announcement came not long after Kim appeared to make good on his promise to demolish his country's nuclear test site. But it also followed escalating frustration — and newly antagonistic rhetoric — from North Korea over comments from Trump aides about U.S. expectations for the North's "denuclearization."

The White House has repeatedly offered mixed messages. Hours after releasing his cancellation letter on Thursday, the president declared, "I really believe Kim Jong Un wants to do what's right."

After that, however, a senior White House official said the North had reneged on its promises ahead of the summit. Trump said from the White House that a "maximum pressure campaign" of economic sanctions and diplomatic isolation would continue against North Korea — with which the U.S. is technically still at war — though he added that it was possible the summit could still take place at some point.

On Friday, North Korea's vice foreign minister said his country's "objective and resolve to do our best for the sake of peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula and all humankind remain unchanged."



53960


Children used as bombers

Indonesia's parliament unanimously approved a tougher anti-terrorism law on Friday, lengthening detention periods and involving the military in counter-terrorism operations, spurred into action by recent bombings that involved children as perpetrators.

Rights groups had criticized some revisions as overly broad or vague and warned against rushing them into law. The scope for the military to become involved in counter-terrorism operations is contentious because it backtracks on two decades of keeping soldiers out of areas under civilian authority.

President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo had threatened to impose the changes by special decree if parliament didn't rapidly approve them. Changes were first proposed after a January 2016 suicide bombing and gun attack in Jakarta but languished in the legislature.

Police have killed 14 suspected Islamic militants and arrested 60 since the suicide bombings May 13-14 in Indonesia's second-largest city, Surabaya, that were carried out by radicalized families, who involved their children, as young as 7, in the attacks.

The suicide bombings, which horrified Muslim-majority Indonesia, killed 26 people, including 13 members of the families that carried them out. The key perpetrator was leader of the Surabaya cell of an Indonesian militant network that professes loyalty to the Islamic State group.

The new law triples the maximum detention period without charge for suspected militants to 21 days and roughly doubles the entire permissible detention period from arrest to trial to more than two years.

Several articles address gaps in the original law from 2003, giving greater legal basis to prosecute individuals such as radical clerics who inspire attacks or Indonesians who travelled abroad to join IS.

The definition of terrorist acts and threats was expanded to include motives of ideology, politics and security disruption. Some lawmakers said that would prevent the law from being abused.

Military involvement in counter-terrorism operations will be defined later by presidential regulation.



Capsizing - at least 49 dead

Congolese officials say at least 49 people have died after a boat tipped over on the Congo River in the country's northwest.

The vice governor of Tshuapa province, Richard Mboyo Iluka, says the boat was taking people from Monkoto to Mbandaka city on Thursday but capsized just outside Wafania.

He tells The Associated Press that a team has been dispatched to investigate and get a more realistic death toll.

He says he doesn't know how many people were on the boat or how many are thought to have survived.

The vice governor says the cause of the accident remains unknown.

Boats transporting people along the river, a key travel corridor in Congo, are often overcrowded.



Russia rejects responsibility

The Netherlands and Australia said Friday that they are holding Russia legally responsible for the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, which was shot down over war-ravaged eastern Ukraine nearly four years ago, killing all 298 people on board.

The announcement by the foreign ministers of both countries came a day after international investigators announced that the missile system that brought down the Amsterdam-Kuala Lumpur flight came from a Russia-based military unit. They displayed photos and videos from social media tracking a large convoy of rocket launchers through Russia.

Dutch Foreign Minister Stef Blok said that following that conclusion, "the government is now taking the next step by formally holding Russia accountable."

"The Netherlands and Australia today asked Russia to enter into talks aimed at finding a solution that would do justice to the tremendous suffering and damage caused by the downing of MH17," Blok said in a statement. "A possible next step is to present the case to an international court or organization for their judgment."

Russia denies involvement in the July 17, 2014, missile strike that blew the Boeing 777 out of the sky at 33,000 feet (about 10,000 metres) over war-ravaged eastern Ukraine.

Bodies, debris and burning wreckage were strewn over a field of sunflowers near the rebel-held village of Hrabove in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine, about 40 kilometres (25 miles) from the Russian border, where fighting had been raging for months.

Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, rejected the accusations. He said that Russia has been barred from the international investigation and thus can't trust its results. He also charged that Ukraine contributed to the tragedy by failing to ban civilian air traffic over the war zone.

The Russian Defence Ministry said Friday that rocket fragments displayed Thursday by investigators indicated the Soviet-made missile was produced in 1986. It said the Russian military decommissioned all missiles of that type in 2011.

It added that Ukraine inherited such missiles from the Soviet army, adding that the fragments displayed by the investigators indicated the weapon "more than likely belonged to the Ukrainian armed forces."

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told reporters that Moscow has co-operated with the investigation and sent data including radar images from the day the plane was shot down.



Lava still flowing

Lava entered the ocean from a third flow, marking the third week of a Hawaii volcano eruption that has opened up nearly two dozen vents in rural communities, destroyed dozens of buildings and shot miles-high plumes of ash into the sky.

Low lava fountains were erupting from a nearly continuous 2-mile-long (3.22-kilometre) portion of the series of fissures that have opened up in the ground, scientists said Thursday. The fountains were feeding channelized lava flows down to the coast. The eastern-most channel split, creating three ocean entries Wednesday.

Since the eruption began on May 3, Hawaii County has ordered about 2,000 people to evacuate from Leilani Estates and surrounding neighbourhoods.

Hawaii officials have said they may need to evacuate a thousand more people if lava crosses key highways and isolates communities in the mostly rural part of the island where the Kilauea volcano is erupting.

A blocked highway would cut people off from the only route to grocery stores, schools and hospitals.

The U.S. Marine Corps said Thursday that it has sent two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters from a base near Honolulu to help if more evacuations become necessary. Each helicopter can carry 50 passengers.

The volcano has opened more than 20 vents in the ground that have released lava, sulfur dioxide and steam. The lava has been pouring down the flank of the volcano and into the ocean miles away.

Lava has destroyed 50 buildings, including about two dozen homes. One person was seriously injured after being hit by a flying piece of lava.

There continues to be intermittent explosions at the summit that have been sending plumes of ash into the sky. On Wednesday, the volcano belched a plume that reached about 7,000 feet (2,133 metres), scientists said. Right before the explosion, there was a 3.9 magnitude earthquake at the summit.



Weinstein surrenders

Harvey Weinstein turned himself in to police Friday morning to face the first criminal charges to be filed against him after months of sexual abuse allegations from scores of women that destroyed his career and set off a national reckoning known as the #MeToo movement.

Weinstein, 66, stepped from a black SUV and walked slowly into a Manhattan police station before a crowd of news cameras. He didn't answer respond to shouts of his name.

The exact charges against Weinstein still had not been made public early Friday. Two law enforcement officials told The Associated Press the case will include allegations by Lucia Evans, an aspiring actress who has said the Hollywood mogul forced her to perform oral sex on him in his office. She was among the first women to speak out about the producer.

One official said it's likely the case also will include at least one other victim who has not come forward publicly.

The officials spoke Thursday to the AP on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the investigation.

Weinstein was expected to be charged at least with criminal sexual act, a crime that carries up to 25 years in prison, the officials said.

Weinstein's attorney, Benjamin Brafman, declined to comment when first contacted about the charges late Friday, but previously said in court paperwork that the allegations that Weinstein forced himself on women were "entirely without merit" and that he never knowingly broke the law.

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance had been under enormous public pressure to bring a criminal case against Weinstein. Some women's groups, including the Hollywood activist group Time's Up, accused the Democrat of being too deferential to Weinstein and too dismissive of his accusers.

A grand jury has been hearing evidence in the case for weeks.

In March, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo took the extraordinary step of ordering the state's attorney general to investigate whether Vance acted properly in 2015 when he decided not to prosecute Weinstein over a previous allegation of unwanted groping, made by an Italian model. That investigation is in its preliminary stages.

More than 75 women have accused Weinstein of wrongdoing around the globe. Several actresses and models accused him of criminal sexual assaults, but many of the encounters happened too long ago for any prosecution. Film actress Rose McGowan said Weinstein raped her in 1997 in Utah, "Sopranos" actress Annabella Sciorra said he raped her in her New York apartment in 1992 and Norwegian actress Natassia Malthe said he attacked her in a London hotel room in 2008.



Honda's packin' heat

Talk about gunning the engine.

Authorities say a driver near Tacoma, Wash., saw an object strike the front of his car during his evening commute Wednesday. When he stopped for gas 30 kilometres later, he discovered it was a handgun.

The weapon was embedded in his bumper, barrel-end first, with the trigger sticking out just below the driver's-side headlight.

Washington State Patrol Trooper Guy Gill says the driver notified troopers, who recovered the gun, which was missing its magazine. Gill calls it a "completely bizarre way to recover a weapon."

The driver didn't know whether the gun came from an overpass or another vehicle.

Lakewood Police Lt. Chris Lawler says the department is investigating whether it was linked to a nearby fight where shots were fired.



Weinstein arrest imminent

UPDATE 1:35 p.m.

Law enforcement officials say Harvey Weinstein is expected to surrender to authorities Friday morning to face criminal charges in a months-long investigation into allegations that he sexually assaulted women.

The two officials said the criminal case involves allegations by Lucia Evans, a former actress who was among the first women to speak out about Weinstein. The case would be the first criminal charge against the film producer since scores of women began coming forward to accuse him of harassment or assault, triggering a cascade of accusations against media and entertainment figures that has become known as the #MeToo movement.

A grand jury has been hearing evidence in the case for weeks.

The precise charges Weinstein is expected to face weren't immediately clear. Weinstein's attorney, Benjamin Brafman, declined to comment. Weinstein has said repeatedly, through his lawyers, that he did not have nonconsensual sex with anyone.

In recent months, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance has come under enormous public pressure to make a criminal case. Some women's groups, including the Hollywood activist group Time's Up, accused the Democrat of being too deferential to Weinstein and too dismissive of his accusers.

In March, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo took the extraordinary step of ordering the state's attorney general to investigate whether Vance acted properly in 2015 when he decided not to prosecute Weinstein over a previous allegation of unwanted groping, made by an Italian model.

Vance had insisted any decision would be based on the strength of the evidence, not on political considerations.

Weinstein was fired from the company he co-founded and expelled from the organization that bestows the Academy Awards last fall after The New York Times and The New Yorker published articles about his treatment of women, including multiple allegations that he groped actresses, exposed himself to them or forced them into unwanted sex.

His accusers included some of the biggest names in Hollywood. Several actresses and models accused him of criminal sexual assaults, including film actress Rose McGowan, who said Weinstein raped her in 1997 in Utah, "Sopranos" actress Annabella Sciorra, who said he raped her in her New York apartment in 1992, and the Norwegian actress Natassia Malthe, who said he attacked her in a London hotel room in 2008. Another aspiring actress, Mimi Haleyi, said Weinstein forcibly performed oral sex on her in his New York apartment in 2006.


ORIGINAL 1:11 p.m.

Harvey Weinstein expected to be arrested Friday in New York sexual misconduct investigation.

More coming.



'Show Dogs' scenes cut

Two scenes are being cut from the family movie "Show Dogs" after complaints that they resemble real-life sexual abuse, the movie's distributor has announced.

In the movie, a police dog goes undercover at a dog show to catch animal smugglers.

In one scene, the dog is told to go to his "zen place" when he objects to having his testicles touched by a show judge.

In another scene, the dog is urged to overcome his resistance to being touched to become a champion.

Parenting bloggers first raised objections to the scenes, which they said resemble tactics used by abusers.

"During the movie, I kept thinking, 'This is wrong, it doesn't need to be in a kids movie," wrote blogger Terina Maldonado. "Everything else in the movie is good fun except for this.'"

Distributor Global Road Entertainment said in a statement Wednesday it "decided to remove two scenes from the film 'Show Dogs' that some have deemed not appropriate for children."

The statement added: "We apologize to anybody who feels the original version of 'Show Dogs' sent an inappropriate message. The revised version of the film will be available for viewing nationwide starting this weekend."

Maldonado said she was especially disturbed that her daughter said one of the scenes was her favourite part of the movie.

The National Center on Sexual Exploitation had also objected to the scenes, and urged that they be cut.

The film starring Will Arnett and the voice of Ludacris was released last weekend and was the No. 6 film at the box office after earning $6 million.



Sledgehammer road rage

A road rage suspect seen on surveillance video hitting a man with a sledgehammer after smashing the windows out of a vehicle is being sought by Philadelphia police.

Video of the parking lot attack was posted online by the police department Wednesday. It shows the assailant exiting his pickup truck with a sledgehammer and busting out the driver's side window of an SUV.

A passenger in the SUV then opens his door and falls out as the driver tries to speed away. The attacker hits the passenger with the sledgehammer as he limps off to get back in the SUV. The man with the sledgehammer then smashes the SUV's rear window as it drives off.

Police are still trying to identify the attacker and the victims.



More World News

World
53842
London Webcam
Webcam provided by webcams.travel
47812
Recent Trending
54022
Okanagan Oldies
51110
Castanet Proud Member of RTNDA Canada
52352



51869
55152