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Campus Life - Kamloops  

Prestigious panel tackles our connection with food

Usually we’re more focused on the flavour of our food than its significance in the bigger picture. But a panel of food experts will bring an international perspective to our food and its role in community, culture and sustainability.

This free community event—which involves food and continued dialogue afterward—takes the stage at the Campus Activity Centre Grand Hall on Tuesday, March 6, starting at 7 p.m.

The event is free, but registration is required. Reserve here.

The panelists

Panelists include Ocean Wise founder and chef Ned Bell, Crannog Ales and Left Fields farmer Rebecca Kneen, writer and sustainability speaker Taras Grescoe, Hawaiian speaker/author/professor Manulani Aluli Meyer and Dawn Morrison, ethnobotanist and director of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty.

Bell, a TV personality and member of Seafood Watch’s Blue Ribbon Task Force, said in his book Lure, he challenges people to eat sustainable seafood once a week and to dive deeper into the conversation about food.

Know who raises your food and find out about where it comes from, he said in a telephone interview.

He suggested breaking out of the same-old, same-old grocery store routine by leaving a blank spot on your shopping list and buying something you’ve never tried before.

“Cooking gives us a great opportunity to shake things up. Challenge yourself to try new things. It’s exciting and delicious. Dig deeper and you get more connected to your ingredients, your community, the farmers and ranchers and artisans. Then the culture, the history, the historical aspect of why that thing is celebrated,” he said.

The man who has created octopus bacon and is finding ways of making seaweed delectable said when we look at food as more than just a meal, we develop more understanding about our world.

“Food connects every human.”

The session will include time for questions to the panelists.



50120


Weyt-k! Aboriginal Awareness Week 2018

Smudging Aboriginal Indigenous

Weyt-k, le7 re7 stskits’c. That’s Secwépemctsin for “Hello, it is good you came.”

Situated on Secwépemc’ulucw, the traditional lands of the Indigenous Secwépemc people, TRU honours this fact every day. One of the biggest ways we do that is with our annual Aboriginal Awareness Week.

Scheduled for Feb. 25 to March 2 and open to everyone, this year’s theme is Reconciliation through Art.

See below for the schedule and unless noted, events are free. Stop in for as little or as long as you like, meet new people, catch up familiar faces, immerse yourself in campus life.

Me7 wíktsen e tskitsc-ucw. See you when you get here.

More Secwepemc greetings and phrases

 


Sunday, Feb. 25

7:30 p.m.Theatre for Living’s performance of šx??a??t (Home)
Grand Hall, Campus Activity Centre
Buy tickets online


Monday, Feb. 26

8 a.m.—Morning smudge
behind Cplul’kw’ten, House 5

8:30 a.m.—Tipi village set up
outside Campus Activity Centre

9:30 a.m.—Opening ceremonies
Grand Hall

10 a.m.—Tipi teachings with Randy BigSorrelHorse
Grand Hall

11 a.m.—Drum ceremony with Ed Jensen
Grand Hall

4 p.m.—Tipi village take down
outside Campus Activity Centre

5:30 p.m.—Social Work SOCW 4300 open class
with Dayna Danger
Arts and Education building, room AE 266

time to be announced—Ribbon Shirt Making
contact [email protected]


Tuesday, Feb. 27

8 a.m.—Morning smudge
behind Cplul’kw’ten

8:30 a.m.—Tipi village set up
outside Campus Activity Centre

11 a.m.–2 p.m.Elders Luncheon
Grand Hall

1–5 p.m.—Artisans market
Campus Activity Centre rotunda

4 p.m.—Tipi village take down
outside Campus Activity Centre

5-6:30 p.m.Bannock Bake-Off
Grand Hall

6–9 p.m.—Faculty of Law panel discussion: Colten Boushie trial
House of Learning, BC Centre


Wednesday, Feb. 28

8 a.m.—Morning smudge
behind Cplul’kw’ten

8 a.m.—Art installation: Confluence of Simpcwetkwe and Tkemlupsetkwe
The confluence of the North and South Thompson rivers, as accessed from the TIB subdivision
contact [email protected]

10 a.m.–2 p.m.—ESTR’s Market chili & bannock
by Elder Doreen Kenoras and ESTR students
There is a price per serving
Old Main, OM 2425

1-2:30 p.m.—Guest speaker: Dayna Danger
Old Main, OM 3732

5 p.m.TRU Traditional Fashion Show and more
Grand Hall, minimum $5 donation

Time to be announced—Ribbon shirt making continued
contact [email protected]


Thursday, March 1

8 a.m.—Morning smudge
behind Cplul’kw’ten

10 a.m.–2 p.m.—ESTR’s Market chili & bannock
by Elder Doreen Kenoras and ESTR students
There is a price per serving
Old Main, OM 2425


Friday, March 2

8 a.m.—Morning smudge
behind Cplul’kw’ten

10 a.m.–noon—Guest speaker: Ed Jensen
Tk’emlups Land, Water and Resources
Old Main, OM 3612

2-3:30 p.m.—Lahal games and student tournament
Campus Activity Centre, TRU Students’ Union boardroom



Gala set to raise $70,000 for student awards

With the title Fortune and Glory, this year’s Indiana Jones-themed TRU Foundation Gala was destined to be another box office hit.

The 320 tickets were sold out by the middle of December—well in advance of the Feb. 17, 2018 event at the Campus Activity Centre. Gala is a fundraiser for student awards, bursaries and scholarships and the amount raised is expected to near $70,000.

The warning at the entrance to the Grand Hall.

The crew in charge of decorating, staging and conveying the theme put on an Oscar performance. They created light-projected hieroglyphics, a giant-sized replica of an ancient god in the Grand Hall and re-imagined the space as a vast cave like the one seen in the first Jones movie. Chests of jewels and replica gold coins were also scattered throughout the venue.

In keeping up with the theme, the five-course meal referenced the movie trilogy, with appetizers named X Marks the Spot, Indy’s Boulder Escape and Monkey Brains. The main was called Doc Jones and the River of Snakes while the dessert was Ark of the Covenant.

As fun as the night was with its opportunity to network and catch up, participate in silent and live auctions and take in performances by Crossbow, Drum Afreaka and The Dave Coalmine Band, the overarching theme of student assistance was not lost.

In memory of their son and former VP of Advancement Christopher Seguin, Deb and Joe Seguin took to the stage and announced the creation of a bursary in his honour.

After their words, the next moments were filled with tears and a standing ovation for someone who truly believed one of the best treasures in life was someone unlocking their potential. And education is one of the best ways to do that.

Click on an image to enlarge

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