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Campus Life  

City of Kelowna and UBC Okanagan sign cooperation agreement

The City of Kelowna and UBC’s Okanagan Campus have a new tool in place to help guide their continued cooperation well into the future.

“The Memorandum of Understanding signed today recognizes the value of our long-standing relationship with UBC and formalizes coordinating of our collective efforts,” said Mayor Colin Basran, City of Kelowna. “The agreement gives future staff, councils and boards direction and the permission to continue to leverage that partnership for the benefit of all residents.”

The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) outlines the City’s and UBC Okanagan’s enhanced collaboration on a broad range of issues designed to positively influence regional economic development and contributions to creating a livable, prosperous and sustainable region. This agreement will provide a framework to further their common interests in research and innovation, community engagement, infrastructure, and risk management.

“UBC’s Okanagan campus is a devoted and integral part of the cultural and economic fabric of the Okanagan Valley,” says Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Principal Deborah Buszard. “This MoU is a formal recognition of the long history of collaboration that we have with the City of Kelowna. By further developing this relationship, we hope to tackle the challenges of tomorrow by advancing the skills, talent and ideas of our community today.”

The MoU will remain valid indefinitely and will be managed by a designated Steering Committee with representation from both the City and UBC. The Steering Committee will be co-chaired by City and UBC appointees and the agreement will be reviewed periodically.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca





From head of the class to head of the boardroom, do grades really matter?

UBC experts discuss relationship between academic ability and hirability

As grade-schoolers concentrate on the three Rs, many university students are already planning their future careers. Many believe top grades are the key to landing successful jobs, but does this always hold true? UBC Okanagan researchers, including Assoc. Prof. Andis Klegeris and Heather Hurren, have published new findings that highlight the importance of problem-solving skills and how these are not always correlated with an A+.

What do you believe employers are looking for?

Assoc. Prof. Andis Klegeris: Today’s job market is highly competitive across almost all sectors. Previous research findings have shown that the most sought-after skills of new employees are the ability to work in a team environment and being able to apply meaningful problem-solving skills.

Can you explain how you define problem-solving skills?

AK: Problem-solving skills involve several interconnected tasks such as processing information, reasoning, planning and decision-making. We believe that these are learnable, with experience, but they tend to be unteachable through classical lecturing because often, there is no clear path or “right answer.”  Examples may include how to fix a broken appliance, putting furniture together and travelling abroad without knowledge of the local language.

What was your most recent research and what are the take-homes?

AK: In our latest study, we administered a generic problem-solving test to almost 1,000 university students. We compared the scores achieved in this test with the students’ academic marks and found that these two measures were not correlated. In other words, academic learning and problem-solving may represent two independent skill sets for students. This further suggests that high academic grades are not are not a predictor of problem-solving ability. And receiving great marks doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be an exemplary employee.

What can universities do to enhance a student’s employment success?

AK: Many employers already distinguish academic and job-related abilities as independent skills by placing less emphasis on grade-point-averages than students do.

We believe that different classroom approaches can be used to enhance problem-solving skills and employability. For example, some of our instructors are already using flipped classroom approaches with self-guided learning, interactive discussion and collaborative work.

A helpful approach might be to develop a problem-solving skills testing tool, with the aim of eventually developing a comprehensive student portfolio that would highlight achievements in various categories of skills. This would provide future employers with broader information about a student’s ability.

We think it would be interesting to follow up with students to see if this is something they would like.

About the authors

  • Andis Klegeris is an Associate Professor of Biology in UBC Okanagan’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences
  • Emelie Gustafsson is a sessional instructor of Statistics in UBC Okanagan’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences
  • Heather Hurren is the Manager of Academic Development at UBC Okanagan

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca



New pilot project at Okanagan College promotes student wellness

Okanagan College Media Release

A new wellness pilot project is underway at Okanagan College’s Penticton campus and has set out to help students thrive in their studies and personal lives by teaching skills and tools to manage and promote positive mental health.Flourish Sept 2017

“Flourish is a series of workshops held on campus that model and teach students different ways of managing stress, anxiety and depression so that when they experience those overwhelming feelings they have a well-rounded toolbox of healthy ways to regulate them,” says Sarah Lefebure, Counsellor at Okanagan College and co-creator of Flourish.

The workshop series will offer activities, resources and support to help students combat stress. Additionally, guest speakers will help open up the conversation about mental health and work to break down stigmas of mental illness and the challenges students encounter in daily life.

“This project was developed very organically,” says Paula Faragher, Accessibility Services Coordinator at Okanagan College and co-creator of Flourish. “Sarah and I recognized gaps in services in terms of working with students who were experiencing really high levels of stress and anxiety while going to school.”

The project is based on a model of mental wellbeing that suggests everyone experiences times where they are flourishing, languishing or somewhere in between. Mental health care is not only for those diagnosed with a mental illness – everyone can benefit.

“We always believed that healthy campuses equaled healthy minds but it wasn’t until we saw statistics from a campus-wide mental health survey that Flourish really grew into the project it is,” says Faragher.

Last winter, OC Human Kinetics Professor Wendy Wheeler and her class conducted a mental health survey at the Penticton campus. It was found that in the past 12 months 49 per cent of students felt so depressed it was difficult for them to function, 57 per cent have felt overwhelming anxiety and 74 per cent have felt very sad.

“As a counsellor, our goal is to create and maintain a positive climate for students to succeed, both academically and in their personal lives, and a major part of doing that is promoting positive mental health,” says Lefebure.

Flourish was created and received full support from Okanagan College, which awarded the project with an Innovation Fund grant (the College’s internal grant for innovative new programs and initiatives).

“At Okanagan College, we are committed to expanding awareness of mental health issues and providing resources for those students in need of wellness supports,” says Charlotte Kushner Vice President, Students. “We are delighted to support Flourish.”

“The link between student wellness and academic success is well documented and the most recent studies suggest there is a need to improve mental health supports for post-secondary students who are facing an increasingly complex world,” says Kushner. “Students and student success are at the heart of everything we do at Okanagan College and we are committed to expanding awareness of mental health and providing resources for those students in need of wellness supports.”

The first workshop took place this week and looked into the physical, mental and emotional effects stress has on the body. The drop-in workshops are held bi-weekly on Mondays from 2:30-3:45 p.m. at Okanagan College’s Penticton campus in the Community Hall (PC 113). Flourish is open to all students and is free to attend. For more information on Flourish including workshop dates, please visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/flourish.

 



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Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends award South Okanagan students

Okanagan College Media Release

Thorpe Awards Sept 2017Six students will jump-start their educational dreams at Okanagan College this fall after receiving financial awards through the Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends scholarship.

Makeena Hartmann, Hailey Grunow and Mickella Di Lorenzo Biggs, recent graduates of Princess Margaret Secondary School in Penticton, along with Ericka Bidwell from Summerland Secondary, each received a $2,500 Scholarship for Secondary School Graduates.

Matthew Ironside of Penticton and Timothy Bey of Princeton were awarded with a $1,000 Entrance Award for Trades and Technology.

“It’s really nice to have help when you are going to school, because costs can be a barrier,” says Hartmann, who had a choice of post-secondary options with a 99.8 GPA. She chose to enrol in the Associate of Arts Degree program because she was impressed by the College’s reputation.

“It’s rewarding to see the effort I put into my studies is being recognized and appreciated through this scholarship,” she adds.

In addition to the high academic achievement of the recipients, the Thorpes look for students who are engaged with and contribute to their communities.

Grunow currently works two jobs and has been actively volunteering in Penticton to fundraise for dry grad, LGBTQ anti-bullying initiatives and the Penticton YES Project. She appreciates the scholarship doesn’t just open doors to her education, it will also provide opportunities for continued volunteerism.

“When I learned I received the scholarship I had tears of joy,” says Grunow, who is also entering the Associate of Arts Degree program. “Having the financial burden off my shoulders means I don’t need to work as much, and allows me to pay forward the Thorpe’s generosity by spending more time giving back through volunteering.”

The Thorpes have a long history of championing education in the South Okanagan, and have supported students at Okanagan College and UBC Okanagan for more than a decade. Since the inception of the scholarship program in 2006, $102,250 has been awarded to 49 students entering Okanagan College.

“The contributions of Rick and Yasmin Thorpe impact our students in transformative ways as they begin their educational journey at the College,” says Kathy Butler, Executive Director of the Okanagan College Foundation. “We deeply appreciate their donations, and the support of our other donors in Penticton who provide life-changing opportunities for students.”

Each year the Thorpes make a point of presenting the scholarships in person to the recipients and their families.

“Meeting with students is very uplifting,” says Yasmin John-Thorpe. “They are enthusiastic and happily optimistic about their future.”

For the students, the level of donor interaction is a highlight.

“It's very heartwarming they take the time to get to know each of us,” adds Grunow. “It is so generous they choose to donate their hard-earned money to help students follow their dreams.”

Applications for the 2018 Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends Scholarships open in early November 2017 and close in March 2018. Students are encouraged to review the application guidelines at www.okanagan.bc.ca/awards for more information. 

 




High school students get a head start on post-secondary education

Okanagan College Media Release

 

A new partnership between Okanagan College and School District No. 23 will give Grade 12 students a head start in post-secondary education as a certified Education Assistant.

For recent graduate Tiffany Walker, an early start in the Education Assistant certificate program has helped her realize a dream she’s long been chasing.

“I’ve always loved being with children and once I found out there was an established route to becoming an Education Assistant, I jumped on the opportunity – I’m very happy I did,” says Walker.

Like Walker, high school students who have excelled in their studies can apply to be a dual-credit student in their Grade 12 year. Once accepted, the program will allow students to split their final academic year, spending the first half completing their Grade 12 studies and the second half studying and working towards completion of an Education Assistant certificate from Okanagan College.

“An Education Assistant is someone that works with children with exceptionalities in cognitive abilities, physical challenges, behavioral challenges, autism and related disorders,” says Valerie Banks, Program Coordinator at Okanagan College. “EAs help children with everything from homework to behaviour.”

The four and a half-month, full-time program is offered at George Elliot Secondary School in Lake Country. It gives students the foundation, knowledge and experience to work in British Columbia school districts as well as with special needs adults in group homes and individual families who have children that need assistance.

“School District No. 23 approached us to form a dual-credit partnership and help bring forward the next generation of Education Assistants,” says Banks. “The demand for EAs is high within Kelowna’s school district, which requires all EAs to be certified.”

School District No. 23 is actively involved in the program and works closely with the College to connect students with practicums and educate them on career opportunities in the district.

“The manager of Human Resources from the School District hosts a workshop to talk to EA students about the hiring process. Each student knows exactly how to apply for jobs and how the process of working with the School District goes,” says Banks. “The School District also assists with assigning a month-long practicum to each student to ensure they get real experience and are ready for the workforce.”

“I did my practicum at AS Matheson and it was the best part about the entire program,” says Walker. “The way the program and practicum were laid out made me confident that I had a solid foundation to really do well in the practicum.”

The Education Assistant certificate program is currently accepting dual-credit applications until Sept. 29 for the Jan. 2018 intake. There are also seats available for the general public as well. To find out more information about the program and requirements, please visit okanagan.bc.ca/ea.

 



Social entrepreneur workshop returns for second installment

Okanagan College Media Release

A popular workshop for social entrepreneurs is returning to Okanagan College to equip those seeking real-world solutions to challenges in our communities with the essential business tools needed to set social enterprise ideas in motion.

Back for the second time since the project piloted in May, Okanagan College, the Scotiabank Centre for Non-Profit Excellence and Purppl, a social enterprise accelerator, are joining forces to lead the SoFun workshop. The one-day inclusive workshop is on Tuesday, Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Vernon campus of Okanagan College in room E102/103.SoFun Team Sept 2017

“The SoFun workshop uses global entrepreneurial best practices and tools to help social entrepreneurs build predictable, sustainable revenue models that can fund long-term solutions to our toughest community, social and environmental challenges,” says Andrew Greer, founder of Purppl and SoFun co-facilitator. “Communities are struggling under the weight of chronic challenges and organizations trying to solve these challenges are typically underfunded, under resourced and donor dependent.”

Participants will examine the case study of Mission Possible (an organization which helps those affected by homelessness find meaningful work) through the global-standard Business Model Canvas tool. The model applies lean thinking, which aims to shorten the process from startup to implementation, therefore increasing efficiency and impact of the business idea. Participants will also be able to apply key learnings to their own business ideas and work on them while making the most of access to experts and resources in the room.

“This workshop is one way to put information in the hands of those ready to help make changes that will benefit our community,” says Dr. Kyleen Myrah, Okanagan College School of Business professor, faculty researcher at the Centre and SoFun co-facilitator.

Attendees will each receive a copy of the Business Model Canvas, will have an opportunity to work on their own social enterprise ideas, explore available business resources, connect with other like-minded individuals and have access to learn with and from other social entrepreneurs.

“We saw a really rich diversity of entrepreneurs at the first workshop. From beginner to experienced, there was a real excitement and interest in understanding the complexity of social enterprises,” says Greer.

The workshop is suited for: leaders of non-profits, individuals working in existing organizations (non-profit and for-profit) with social enterprise initiatives, entrepreneurs looking to solve a social problem in their community, government employees looking to implement impact initiatives and students.

Myrah and Greer will be joined by OC business professor Kerry Rempel to lead the workshop. Local social entrepreneur, Jaye Coward from the award-winning Farm Bound will also join the presentation team as the luncheon speaker.

Tickets are $45 at www.sofun-vernon.eventbrite.ca and include lunch, coffee and tea.

 

 



UBC research discovers a chemical-free way to keep apples fresher longer

Blue mold growth on a Spartan apple

Blue mold growth on a Spartan apple

A common soil bacterium may be the answer to reduce fruit losses

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but the mold on it could make you sick.

Rhiannon Wallace, a PhD candidate at UBC Okanagan’s campus, has developed a way to stop, or at least control, blue mold—a pathogen that can rot an apple to its core. Wallace’s research has determined that bacteria, originally isolated from cold Saskatchewan soils, may be the answer to preventing mold growth and apple rot while the fruit is in storage or transport.

“The majority of postharvest fungal pathogens are opportunistic,” explains Wallace, who is working with UBC Biology Prof. Louise Nelson. “If a fruit is physically damaged, it is at an increased risk of rotting during storage. So a tiny blemish on the fruit from harvest or handling can turn into a conduit for attack by fungal pathogens and subsequently result in the development of mold.”

Rhiannon Wallace, a PhD candidate at UBC Okanagan’s campus, has developed a way to protect apples from rotting.

Rhiannon Wallace, a PhD candidate at UBC Okanagan’s campus, has developed a way to protect apples from rotting.

The fungal pathogen Penicillium expansum, also known as blue mold, destroys millions of stored apples each year. Post-harvest rot can result in yield losses of up to 20 per cent in developed countries such as Canada, while developing countries can lose up to 50 per cent of the crop, Wallace says.

The goal of her research is to reduce the amount of produce lost due to post-harvest blue mold. Traditionally, post-harvest rot has been controlled with chemical fungicides, but Wallace says these treatments have become less effective as the pathogen has developed resistance and there is consumer pushback to the chemicals. The research by Wallace and Nelson aims to provide a safer and more sustainable alternative to fungicides.

Wallace suggests the solution may lie in a particular bacterium specific to Saskatchewan soil. Pseudomonas fluorescens, due to its prairie roots, can survive in cold storage—a characteristic that is key to dealing with cold-stored produce like apples.

During tests conducted at the British Columbia Tree Fruits Cooperative storage facility in the Okanagan, Wallace determined that these bacteria can prevent blue mold from growing on McIntosh and Spartan apples while in storage. In addition, during these experiments, the bacteria provided control of blue mold on apples that was comparable to a commercially available biological control agent and a chemical fungicide.

“What is novel about our research is that we show the bacterial isolates we tested have an array of mechanisms to inhibit or kill Penicillium expansum (blue mold) on apples while fungicides generally act only by a single mode,” Wallace says. “These findings suggest that the development of resistance by blue mold against our soil bacteria is unlikely.”

She does note that while all three isolates of P. fluorescens tested provided control of blue mold, the level of control provided by each isolate varied with apple variety.

Wallace’s research, supported by the Canadian Horticulture Council and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, was recently published in the journal Postharvest Biology and Technology. Further support came from the BC Tree Fruits Cooperative and Agriculture Canada’s Summerland Research and Development Centre.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca

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Aircraft industry expansion creates new jobs for Okanagan College grads

Okanagan College Media Release

AME-S Sept 2017A large expansion in the local aircraft industry and national un-met staffing demands has fueled Okanagan College to offer an additional intake of its Aircraft Maintenance Engineering-Structures program this fall.

Starting on Nov. 14, the program will see up to 12 students step into KF Aerospace’s shop space at the Kelowna International Airport to begin training for one of the region’s most in-demand careers. Thanks to an accelerated 37-week program, students will be ready to enter the workforce by August.

“Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Structural Technicians (AME-S) have always been one of the most sought-after specialists in aviation,” says Steve Moores, Dean of Trades and Apprenticeship at Okanagan College. “With the industry growth and the number of retiring aircraft engineers, we knew it would only be a matter of time before the demand became a big obstacle for local and national employers.”

“In the last 10 years, we’ve built three new hangars in Kelowna and tripled the floor space and the number of aircrafts of which we can do heavy maintenance on,” says Grant Stevens, Director of Human Resources for KF Aerospace. “The number one staffing shortage we have is for AME-S – we just can’t hire trained technicians fast enough.”Grant Stevens Sept 2017

Not only is there a local demand there is also a nation-wide demand. Boeing, a major Canadian airline, predicts a global industry need for 609,000 aircraft maintenance technicians over the next 20 years, making it the most in-demand occupation in the aviation industry.

After searching for and hiring 60 AMEs from various trades schools throughout Canada, KF Aerospace still came up short on staffing and currently has 40 openings for Structural Technicians. Looking for a solution, KF Aerospace approached Okanagan College earlier this summer – setting the wheels in motion for launching the new class.

“KF is supporting this new intake of students through additional space in their hangars, tools, equipment, work benches, office space and more,” says Moores. “Over the past five years our partnership has been amazing and this just adds to it.”

“Our commitment to Okanagan College and the AME programs is to hire a minimum of half the graduating class, however the last three years straight we’ve hired every single graduating student,” says Stevens.

This year will be no different as KF anticipates hiring the entire 12-person class. Conditional upon graduating, students will be interviewed and offered jobs in July 2018, a month before the program is even finished.

“Alongside OC, we hold open houses before each program intake to show prospective students what the workplace looks like, the type of work they’ll be doing, job openings, advancement opportunities as well as what benefit and salary structures look like – we’re very open with what OC graduates can expect from KF Aerospace,” says Stevens.

The next open house is on Sept. 20 at 6 p.m. at KF Aerospace’s location at the Kelowna Airport. It will equip prospective students with the knowledge and resources to enrol in the program and to make a successful career in the aviation industry. Attendance is free and open to the public.

For more information on the Aircraft Maintenance Engineering Structures program and upcoming open houses, please visitwww.okanagan.bc.ca/ame

 




The perfect play: education a game-winning tactic

Okanagan College Media Release

With a promising hockey career on the horizon,18-year-old Myles Mattila is laying the groundwork for a bright future—combining his passion for competitive hockey with a solid business education at Okanagan College.Myles Mattila Sept 2017

The right-winger joined the Kelowna Chiefs this season after making his mark with the Okanagan Rockets and Cariboo Cougars. He is just one of approximately 2,380 new students who began classes at one of Okanagan College’s four campuses last week.

“My goal definitely is to play hockey at the highest level possible,” says Mattila. “I can excel in hockey, but why not also with a degree in hand? You never know if an injury or other circumstances could sideline me.”

Finding a program that would not make him choose between hockey or education was key.

“With team practice mid-day I needed something that afforded me the scheduling flexibility to still play competitively,” explains the former Quesnel resident, who recently returned to Kelowna. “That’s why I chose Okanagan College; I was able to build my timetable with morning and evening classes.”

Mattila is confident that the community focus at Okanagan College will also enable him to pursue his other passion: championing mental health awareness. He’s already received wide-spread recognition for his efforts. In June he was bestowed the BC Hockey President’s Award for his dedication to the cause as the founder of MindRight.info, a website designed to educate the Cariboo Cougars hockey community about mental health. He even received a Twitter nod from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for his efforts.

“The business program at the College has a reputation for community involvement and enabling students to give back,” says Mattila. “I’m confident that pursuing the management specialty will help me make connections to advance mental health awareness.”

Relatively new to Kelowna, Mattila has already been asked to represent the city at the International Conference on Youth Mental Health. He will travel to Dublin, Ireland in two weeks where he will collaborate with young leaders from around the world who are committed to creating positive changes in youth mental health.

As for long-term goals, even if a professional hockey career pans out: “I’d love to become a lawyer one day, but one thing at a time,” he says. “For now, I’ll just enjoy my first weeks as a college student.”

 




Better, cheaper bio-ink may be used to create artificial organs

UBC investigates gelatin-based hydrogel for regenerative medicine

UBC Okanagan’s Keekyoung Kim has great hopes for the bio-ink he is researching in his lab.

UBC Okanagan’s Keekyoung Kim has great hopes for the bio-ink he is researching in his lab.

A new bio-ink that may support a more efficient and inexpensive fabrication of human tissues and organs has been created by researchers at UBC’s Okanagan campus.

Keekyoung Kim, an assistant professor at UBC Okanagan’s School of Engineering, says this development can accelerate advances in regenerative medicine.

Using techniques like 3D printing, scientists are creating bio-material products that function alongside living cells. These products are made using a number of biomaterials including gelatin methacrylate (GelMA), a hydrogel that can serve as a building block in bio-printing. This type of bio-material—called bio-ink—are made of living cells, but can be printed and molded into specific organ or tissue shapes.

The UBC team analyzed the physical and biological properties of three different GelMA hydrogels—porcine skin, cold-water fish skin and cold-soluble gelatin. They found that hydrogel made from cold-soluble gelatin (gelatin which dissolves without heat) was by far the best performer and a strong candidate for future 3D organ printing.

“A big drawback of conventional hydrogel is its thermal instability. Even small changes in temperature cause significant changes in its viscosity or thickness,” says Kim. “This makes it problematic for many room temperature bio-fabrication systems, which are compatible with only a narrow range of hydrogel viscosities and which must generate products that are as uniform as possible if they are to function properly.”

Kim’s team created two new hydrogels—one from fish skin, and one from cold-soluble gelatin—and compared their properties to those of porcine skin GelMA. Although fish skin GelMA had some benefits, cold-soluble GelMA was the top overall performer. Not only could it form healthy tissue scaffolds, allowing cells to successfully grow and adhere to it, but it was also thermally stable at room temperature.

The UBC team also demonstrated that cold-soluble GelMA produces consistently uniform droplets at temperatures, thus making it an excellent choice for use in 3D bio-printing.

“We hope this new bio-ink will help researchers create improved artificial organs and lead to the development of better drugs, tissue engineering and regenerative therapies,” Kim says. “The next step is to investigate whether or not cold-soluble GelMA-based tissue scaffolds are can be used long-term both in the laboratory and in real-world transplants.”

Three times cheaper than porcine skin gelatin, cold-soluble gelatin is used primarily in culinary applications.

The study was recently published in the August issue of Biofabrication.

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