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Campus Life  

Inaugural Student Chef Dinner and Pie Fundraiser winter highlights for Culinary Arts program

Chef Mike Barillaro

Okanagan College’s Culinary Arts program is serving up good cheer during the last month of 2020, with two new events that will showcase student creations and support the community simultaneously.

On Dec. 10, Infusions Restaurant at the Kelowna campus will open its doors to welcome a limited number of guests for the inaugural Student Chef Dinner, a seven-course tasting experience. The evening gives students an opportunity to showcase their skills and the very best of Okanagan region cuisine.

“The Student Chef Dinner is a fantastic opportunity to taste and see the hard work of our talented students,” says Steve Moores, Dean of Trades and Apprenticeship.

“The unprecedented semester presented a challenge to our cohorts, in that typically they complete the service portion of their curriculum in Infusions on a near daily basis. With Infusions being closed for the semester, this comes as a unique chance for them to share their talents with our community.”

Bake the World a Better Place

Closer to the holidays, the College Culinary Arts department is supporting the Central Okanagan Food Bank’s pie fundraiser, “Bake the World a Better Place”.

More than 25 chefs from the Okanagan region including OC students and Culinary Arts instructor Mike Barillaro, will be producing both sweet and savoury pies for purchase. And while the tortiere, a Canadian meat pie originating in Quebec, produced by the College’s team is now sold out, additional pies are now available in a bidding format.

Local chefs who are taking part in the fundraiser in addition to the College’s level one cohort and Barillaro include alumni Adam Relvas of Relvas Catering and the Sandwich Co.; Jeremy Luypen and Tina Tang of Summerhill Pyramid Winery; Robyn Sigurdson of Sunny’s Modern Diner; Kayla Neufeld of Cake for Breakfast; and Blake Bjornson of Start Fresh Kitchen and Grocery.

To purchase a pie or take part in the bidding, go here.



Proverbial wolf can’t blow down modern timber high-rises, says UBCO researchers

UBCO Engineering Professor Solomon Tesfamariam (centre) examines wood used in mass-timber buildings.

UBCO Engineering Professor Solomon Tesfamariam (centre) examines wood used in mass-timber buildings.

Tall mass-timber buildings are a safe and sustainable alternative for high-rise construction

With an increasing demand for a more sustainable alternative for high-rise construction, new research from UBC Okanagan, in collaboration with Western University and FPInnovations, points to timber as a sustainable and effective way to make tall, high-density, and renewable buildings.

“Many people have trouble imagining a timber high-rise of up to 40 storeys when we’re so used to seeing concrete and steel being the norm in today’s construction,” explains Matiyas Bezabeh, a doctoral candidate at the UBCO School of Engineering. “But we’re starting to demonstrate that the proverbial wolf can’t knock over the pig’s wooden building when they’re built using modern techniques.”

Bezabeh and his supervisors, Professors Solomon Tesfamariam from UBC Okanagan and Girma Bitsuamlak from Western University, conducted extensive wind testing on tall mass-timber buildings of varying height between 10 and 40-storeys at Western University’s Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory.

“We found that the studied buildings up to 20-storeys, using today’s building codes, can withstand high-wind events,” says Bezabeh. “However, in the cases we studied, once we get up to 30 and 40 storeys, aerodynamic and structural improvements would be needed to address excessive wind-induced motion—something that would impact the comfort of those inside.

In 2020, the National Building Code of Canada doubled the height allowance of timber buildings from six storeys to twelve. The 2021 edition of the International Building Code (IBC) will include provisions to allow mass-timber buildings up to 18-stories.

“What’s exciting about our findings is that while additional engineering is required for these taller timber buildings, the problems are absolutely solvable, which opens the door to new architectural possibilities,” adds Tesfamariam. “And with a shift towards sustainable urbanization across North America and Europe, the use of timber as a structural material addresses both the issues of sustainability and renewability of resources.”

Tesfamariam, an engineering professor at UBCO, also sits on the Systems Design and Connections Subcommittee of the Canadian Wood Council, which is responsible for setting building code and engineering standards nationally.

According to Bezabeh, there is a growing acceptance of using mass-timber products such as cross-laminated timber because of its higher strength-to-weight ratio, aesthetics, and construction efficiency.

“We hope our research will continue the design and structural innovation in this area and perhaps one day soon many of us will be living in mass-timber high-rise apartments.”

The School of Engineering offers a new course in advanced design of timber structures, led by Tesfamariam, geared for students and industry professionals interested in understanding timber products, design of timber structural elements, the fundaments of structural dynamics for timber buildings, and the design of low-, mid- and high-rise timber and timber-hybrid buildings.

The research is published in the Journal of Structural Engineering.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers

Socioeconomic status a significant factor in distrust of powerful

A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers.

Leanne ten Brinke, an assistant professor of psychology in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and study co-author, says the study was inspired by her time living in the United States during the 2016 presidential election.

Leanne ten Brinke, assistant professor of psychology in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and study co-author.

Leanne ten Brinke, assistant professor of psychology in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and study co-author.

“I was a post-doc at University of California Berkley and remember being so struck by the different approaches to power being used by then-candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump,” she explains. “It occurred to me then that people have very different perspectives on what it takes to get to the top.”

In a survey of over 1,000 participants, the study looked at their perceptions of two viable paths to power—one through the use of coercion, manipulation and fear-mongering, and the other rooted in collaboration and respect.

“We were interested in how socioeconomic status might affect one’s view on how power is gained and maintained,” says ten Brinke. “We also wondered how identifying with a theory of power might be associated with one’s interpersonal and societal trust.”

Results showed those with lower socioeconomic statuses were generally less-trusting and more inclined to hold a more coercive and less collaborative view of power, while people with higher socioeconomic statuses were more trusting and embraced the opposite view.

“We also found that people held one theory of power or the other—but not both simultaneously,” explains ten Brinke. “As income inequality continues to rise, and we have a widening gap between the powerful and powerless, these results help us understand how these groups view the human hierarchy in which they live.”

Though it’s unclear exactly where the ‘cut-off’ is for one to have the income and status that leads to a more positive view on power, ten Brinke says this research provides much-needed insight into why people carry such differing views.

“I think a lot of it comes down to trust. If we can change peoples’ theories of power, perhaps we can increase trust where it’s due,” she says, adding that further investigation may be helpful in understanding involvement in the democratic process or why some follow public health guidelines when others don’t.

“There’s considerable research that shows low socioeconomic individuals are less likely to vote than high,” she says.

“Part of that is structural—it may be more difficult for them to get time off work—but I suspect theories of power play into it as well. If you think powerful people are coercive and corrupt and you can’t trust any of them, perhaps you think it doesn’t matter who is in office—but that’s not a healthy democracy, so I see this research as a building block for future work in this area.”

This study was recently published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



OC Vernon student donates artwork in memory of instructor

Kendra Scarrott and her artwork titled, Palimpsest

An Okanagan College student has donated a beautiful piece of artwork which she hopes will inspire others as much as the instructor who inspired her.

While it might not be uncommon to find a periodic table adorning the hallways of a post-secondary institution, Okanagan College’s Vernon campus is now home to one unlike any other in the world.

The unique piece of artwork is in honour of former instructor Donna Leigh Goodman, who taught Adult Basic Education programs including science and mathematics courses for 26 years. She passed away in May of 2018.

Kendra Scarrott is the artist behind the painting, a former student of Goodman’s from the 2016-17 school year. Scarrott completed her Math 11 and Chemistry 11 and 12 requirements at Okanagan College and spent nearly every day on campus, seeing Goodman on a regular basis. The piece is titled Palimpsest and will hang in the hallway adjacent the chemistry lab where Goodman taught.

“I began the painting artwork shortly after I finished upgrading at Okanagan College,” said Scarrott. “I was very inspired by what I had learned about the universe and the physical world – particularly the way that humanity's understanding of the universe has changed over time. The idea with Palimpsest was to create a visual representation of this evolving understanding of truth and facts.”

Scarrott hopes the painting reminds people of Goodman and inspires faculty to do their best to make an impact every day.

She added, “I also hope it sparks discussion. There are lots of meaningful little aspects to the piece that I threw in and I hope people can talk and maybe even debate about them.”

“This addition to our campus is a beautiful way of honouring Donna Leigh,” said Jane Lister, Regional Dean for the North Okanagan. “Donna Leigh was dedicated to her students and she made an indelible impression on colleagues and students alike through her passion for teaching.”

“Her work was such a huge part of her life as she strove to teach her students how to solve complex science and math concepts so that they could advance their educational pursuits. On behalf of Okanagan College, we thank Kendra for her thoughtful contribution to our community and for reminding us all of Donna Leigh.”



OC joins Vernon and Salmon Arm communities to hold vigil against violence against women

United Against Violence Against Women Online Candlelight Vigil

Many activities stopped as a result of the 2020 pandemic. Violence against women, however, is not one of them.

This is why communities in the Okanagan and Shuswap are paying special attention to the 31st anniversary of the École Polytechnique Massacre, in addition to the ongoing cases of missing women from the region, with a Virtual Candlelight Vigil on Dec. 6 co-hosted by a network of organizations and volunteers.

“The SAFE Society has been partnering with Okanagan College Students’ Union and Aboriginal Services for over a decade to offer this event. It was important to us to offer this event again this year, even if we cannot be together. We are incredibly grateful to all those who have put their time and energy into making this virtual event happen. COVID-19 has not made violence against women go away. If anything, women have been even more vulnerable during this time. The Dec. 6 event is an important way to remember and honour women who have lost their lives due to violence or continue to struggle with it,” said Kathy McIntyre-Paul, Stopping the Violence Counsellor, SAFE Society.

“Dec. 6, the anniversary of the ‘Montreal Massacre,’ has come to symbolize the threat and reality of violence in women’s daily lives simply because of their gender. The potential for humanity is lost whenever a woman is murdered. This day of remembrance and action is a way of giving a voice to those who have no voice. We must remember and then we must act to create a world where this does not continue to happen. We can start with a national action plan to ensure follow-up to the National Inquiry on Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women’s final report’s calls to justice,” said Micki Materi, Co-Executive Director of Programs, Archway Society for Domestic Peace.

In previous years, communities in Salmon Arm and Vernon would use their home campus to host separate ceremonies. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, however, the event is being combined and hosted virtually to keep organizers and participants safe.

Co-hosted by the SAFE Society, Okanagan College Students’ Union (OCSU), Vernon Students’ Association of OC (VSAOC) and Okanagan College Aboriginal Services, the event will open with a territory welcome and prayers offered by elders from both regions. Welcome songs from the Okanagan and Secwepemc territories will be performed by band members. Representatives from the different nations will speak. A roundtable discussion, organized by OCSU representative Madeline Wiebe and the VSAOC, exploring how safe students feel on campus will be presented. Drumming and the Women’s Warrior Song will be key online features, in addition to music by Jessica Heaven, Jake McIntyre-Paul and Patrick Ryley.

“The Vernon Students’ Association Okanagan College has been a long-time supporter of this event. We are involved in a number of initiatives that tackle violence directed against females, and we are proud to stand with other community organizations to address these systemic issues,” said Eric Reist, General Manager, VSAOC.

On Dec. 6, 1989, an armed man walked into a classroom at Polytechnique Montréal, separated the male students from the females, and killed 14 women. Now known as the École Polytechnique Massacre, the attack stunned the country and sent shockwaves throughout the entire world, prompting discussion about access and inclusion of women in post-secondary education. For more than 30 years, post-secondary institutions have held vigils and ceremonies to remember.

Families in the Shuswap and Okanagan know, however, that the acts of violence are not solely things of the past. Candlelight vigils in the regions have grown in attendance throughout the years as more people learn how Indigenous women are more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women – and as people in the community experience this tragedy for themselves. Since 2016, four women from Salmon Arm, Enderby and Vernon have gone missing: Caitlin Potts, Ashley Simpson, Deanna Wertz and Nicole Bell.

“While we know that this issue has been given national attention, we can’t forget that this can and does happen close to home. Events like this reaffirm our commitment to supporting our local communities,” said James Coble, Director of Student Services, Okanagan College. “Okanagan College stands in solidarity with families and friends of missing women, and know for many, this event can act as a catalyst for healing.”

In addition to the co-hosts, community members and organizations collaborating on the event include: Splatsin Band Coun. and Elder Edna Felix, Elder Penny Lawrence (Okanagan Indian Band and RLTC Board Member), Laureen Felix (Splatsin Band member and local youth advocate), Justen Peters (OKIB), United Church Rev. Jenny Carter, Karen McAndless-Davis (author of When Love Hurts), Michael Ochoa (OKIB), Jacquelyn Rose (Métis Nation) and Deanna Gooden (Native Courtworker and Counselling Association of BC).

At the end of the video vigil, everyone in the Shuswap and Okanagan is invited to light a candle of remembrance in their own home.

For information and to watch videos the day of the vigil, go to www.okanagan.bc.ca/vigil. Given the difficult nature of the event, a special resources section has been established on the webpage as well, providing links to community services, interventions and crisis support.



New UBCO research suggests recycled concrete could be a sustainable way to keep rubble out of landfills

Shahria Alam, co-director of UBC’s Green Construction Research and Training Centre and the lead investigator of the study.

Shahria Alam, co-director of UBC’s Green Construction Research and Training Centre and the lead investigator of the study.

Recycled concrete can even outperform traditional construction, says researcher

Results of a new five-year study of recycled concrete show that it performs as well, and in several cases even better, than conventional concrete.

Researchers at UBC Okanagan’s School of Engineering conducted side-by-side comparisons of recycled and conventional concrete within two common applications—a building foundation and a municipal sidewalk. They found that the recycled concrete had comparable strength and durability after five years of being in service.

“We live in a world where we are constantly in search of sustainable solutions that remove waste from our landfills,” says Shahria Alam, co-director of UBC’s Green Construction Research and Training Centre and the lead investigator of the study. “A number of countries around the world have already standardized the use of recycled concrete in structural applications, and we hope our findings will help Canada follow suit.”

Waste materials from construction and demolition contribute up to 40 per cent of the world’s waste, according to Alam, and in Canada, that waste amounts to nine million tonnes per year.

The researchers tested the compressive strength and durability of recycled concrete compared with conventional concrete.

Concrete is typically composed of fine or coarse aggregate that is bonded together with an adhesive paste. The recycled concrete replaces the natural aggregate for producing new concrete.

“The composition of the recycled concrete gives that product additional flexibility and adaptability,” says Alam. “Typically, recycled concrete can be used in retaining walls, roads and sidewalks, but we are seeing a shift towards its increased use in structures.”

Within the findings, the researchers discovered that the long-term performance of recycled concrete adequately compared to its conventional form, and experienced no issues over the five years of the study. In fact, the recycled concrete had a higher rate of compressive strength after 28 days of curing while maintaining a greater or equal strength during the period of the research.

The researchers suggest the recycled concrete can be a 100 per cent substitute for non-structural applications.

“As innovations continue in the composition of recycled concrete, we can envision a time in the future where recycle concrete can be a substitute within more structural applications as well.”

The research was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), as well as OK Builders Supplies Ltd. and KonKast Products Ltd. through a Collaborative Research & Development grant. It was published in the Journal Construction and Building Materials.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



Thorpe and Friends Scholarship recognizes three South Okanagan students

Thorpe Awards 2020_3

Isaac Halverson was visiting a friend when he learned he was a recipient of this year’s Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends Scholarship Fund, but this did not stop him from running around the house screaming in excitement after reading the news.

“It was incredible. I’ve heard about the award before, and I know friends who’ve received it,” says Halverson, who previously attended Princess Margaret Secondary School in Penticton. Halverson is now in his first year at Okanagan College taking engineering.

“It’s a lot of money, and it means a lot to me.”

Halverson is one of three South Okanagan high school graduates to have received this year’s Rick and Yasmin Thorpe and Friends Scholarship, which provides $2,500 towards their first year at Okanagan College.

The annual awards are given to high school students who demonstrate good grades while contributing to their communities.

Paige Russill and Verity Taylor, both graduates of Summerland Secondary School, also received the awards.

Russill is taking her first semester of an Associate of Arts Degree at the College. She says she wasn’t able to work as much as she wanted as a result of COVID-19, and this scholarship will help pay for her education.

Taylor is also taking the first year of an Associate of Arts Degree with the goal of majoring in psychology and working with children and youth. Taylor says in addition to the funds, she is proud to receive the recognition.

“I really appreciate being chosen for such a prestigious award and I’m thankful for it,” says the seventeen-year-old. “It’s being put to good use to better my future.”

Since 2006 Rick and Yasmin Thorpe, along with their friends, have helped more than 70 students, donating $153,500 to their studies at Okanagan College.

“Our goal is to assist first-year students,” says Rick. “I was impressed by their enthusiasm and now they’re going to Okanagan College and achieving their goals.”

“This year with the COVID-19 pandemic, these awards are even more necessary for students who are probably not going to their jobs,” adds Yasmin.  “The help we give to students makes me feel so good.”

Recently, the Okanagan College Foundation recognized the Thorpe’s longstanding support with a commemorative booklet featuring updates from students who’ve received the awards over the last 14 years.

“Thank you for being an integral part of Okanagan College’s mission to transform lives and communities,” writes Okanagan College President Jim Hamilton and Okanagan College Foundation Executive Director Helen Jackman.??

Students describe your support as pivotal, providing monetary relief but also serving as a source of inspiration and strength. Your award and the recognition that comes with it, helps instill a belief in students that they can achieve great things. Your generous commitment to our students is deeply appreciated.”

Jesse Emmond who received the award in 2007 and went on to become a lawyer, says while the financial need of students is almost always a significant one, there is also a need for pride and recognition.

The motivation you helped instill in me at a younger age provided a qualitative shift in understanding for what I believed I could achieve in my lifetime. It also strengthened my understanding of the value of a supportive community,” writes Emmond in an update to the Thorpes.

Danielle Hofer received the award in 2010, and says the award helped her pay for school, and save enough money to study for a semester abroad in Berlin, Germany. In her role as the President of JCI Kelowna (Jr. Chamber International) Hofer is continually growing her leadership skills, which she credits as first cultivated at the College.

“Thank you for your generous support and for your continued leadership in our community,” says Hofer.



Culinary Arts students help take a bite out of food insecurity, one apple at a time

Okanagan College Culinary Arts student

As the Okanagan days start to get shorter and orchardists wrap up their harvest for the year, Culinary Arts students at the College’s Kelowna campus are busy transforming apples into healthy snacks for the community.

Earlier in the fall semester, the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project (OFTP) approached the College’s Culinary Arts team with an idea: could culinary classes somehow help process apple donations into snacks, going into backpacks for local students in need?

The answer was a resounding yes.

With some creative thought on how to best meet curriculum requirements and please palates, Culinary Arts instructor Kelsey Oudendag identified applesauce as the best item to start with. Using it in a variety of applications, students worked to peel, core and slice apples to make the sauce as well as into apple chips. From there, they went on to use the sauce in breakfast items such as cookies and granola as well as fruit leather.

“It definitely wasn’t difficult to fit this project into the curriculum,” said Oudendag, “we use the apples in so many different ways, from teaching students how to use tools for slicing and coring to utilizing them in our different subject areas like breakfast, baking and fruit preservation.”

Lucie Bardos, project coordinator for the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project, has helped facilitate the project with Oudendag alongside Food for Thought.

“This is a unique collaboration that builds upon the existing partnership we have with Food for Thought over the past few seasons,” she said. “We typically deliver fresh produce directly to Food for Thought for their backpack and breakfast programming. In this case, Okanagan College got involved to help transform the fresh apples into products before the fruit goes to Food for Thought.”

She said, “this adds some additional variety to the food donation and an opportunity for culinary arts students to get involved in a food insecurity initiative.”

The Okanagan Fruit Tree Project functions as a registered charity, operating in the Central and South Okanagan. Orchardists and farmers contact the OFTP and a harvest is organized with the help of volunteers. Fruit is then donated to community partners like Food for Thought right away or taken to cold storage where partners can continue to pick up fruit once the harvest is over.

Food for Thought runs both the backpack and breakfast programs in the Central Okanagan region, providing meals for students at elementary, middle and secondary schools. Since the onset of COVID-19, nearly 500 backpacks per week are distributed on Fridays throughout School District No. 23 and the breakfast program provides nearly 3000 meals directly to schools. The backpacks are designed to cover food needs for the weekend for the student and their family.

For a photo gallery showcasing students transforming the apples into snacks, go here. To learn more about the work the Okanagan Fruit Tree Project is doing, go to the organization’s Facebook and Instagram pages. Details on Food for Thought, running throughout the Central Okanagan, can be found here.

This isn’t the only initiative by OC students that’s helping to feed those in need and eliminate food waste in the region. Earlier this year, Enactus OC students from Vernon adapted their award-winning FruitSnaps to continue to benefit the community during the pandemic. Read more about that project here.



UBC Okanagan rethinks and relaunches its Bachelor of Arts program

Currently accepting students for the 2021 academic year, the newly structured BA is designed to be responsive to students’ needs and to focus on learning in areas that are important for industry when hiring graduates.

Currently accepting students for the 2021 academic year, the newly structured BA is designed to be responsive to students’ needs and to focus on learning in areas that are important for industry when hiring graduates.

‘Not your grandparents’ liberal arts degree,’ says arts dean

In an era when there’s increasing emphasis on students to focus on science, technology, engineering and math—the STEM fields—UBC’s Okanagan campus is relaunching its Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree with an eye to making it even more relevant to today’s changing world.

Currently accepting students for the 2021 academic year, the newly structured BA is designed to be responsive to students’ needs and to focus on learning in areas that are important for industry when hiring graduates. These include communications, critical thinking, scientific and numeric literacy, and Indigenous understanding.

“We’ve done away with the idea of so-called ‘breadth requirements’ in favour of teaching the core skills that employers are clearly looking for,” says Bryce Traister, dean of the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies and acting dean of the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UBC Okanagan—the two faculties that are together offering the new degree.

Traister points to the Indigenous content requirement in particular as an example how the new program is adapting and preparing the newest generation of graduates to grapple with some of the most important issues facing society.

“By introducing an Indigenous studies requirement, UBCO is joining a small handful of universities in Canada working to realize the promise of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission process through education—an important step in creating lasting change for our communities,” says Traister. “Not only do we have a moral imperative to explore and teach these ideas, but the jobs of today and those of tomorrow are going to depend on a workforce with a deep understanding and fulsome appreciation for them.”

But Traister is quick to point out that Indigenous content is just one element of the new BA program. With a long list of courses on offer that he says didn’t exist 20 years ago, students today will benefit from the variety, flexibility and choice that will make their degree more relevant than ever.

“Take a full BA in gender and sexuality studies or race and cultural studies, for example,” he says. “These weren’t available just a generation ago but it’s hard to imagine a subject area more relevant to the working conditions of women and men today, or to our collective engagement with racial inequality and justice.”

While Traister says that the STEM fields are equally important to addressing society’s challenges, it’s when science and engineering are combined with the arts and humanities that humanity can reach its full potential.

“UBCO's Bachelor of Arts degree has been rethought to do exactly that,” he adds. “Graduates will be taught to think critically and creatively, to learn from the past and re-imagine the future—better, greener, safer and more just.”

“There’s never been a more exciting time to pursue a degree in the liberal arts.”

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca



Revelstoke, Vernon student access improves with special Health Care Assistant program intake

HCA student

Training for one of B.C.’s most in-demand professions is coming to Revelstoke and Vernon this January, in a special intake designed to make the most of Okanagan College’s blended learning opportunities.

“The need for health care assistants across B.C. has never been greater. Join the frontlines and be a health-care hero for our most vulnerable citizens while also building a career for yourself,” said Sandra Hohmann, Recruiter, Interior Health.

The intake will feature OC’s signature hands-on learning in labs, allowing students to build their care skills in-person – while being protected with in-class protocols while in their home community. In addition to the hands-on instruction, students will cover theory in online classes.

“All of the components of the Health Care Assistant program are included in this hybrid delivery model, ensuring students gain hands-on experience that builds skills and confidence while they are kept safe during a pandemic,” said Monique Powell, Associate Dean of Science, Technology, Health and Social Development, Okanagan College.

“Combining the theory allows us to expand the offering to more communities, which provides more support to health care in the Okanagan College service region,” said Joan Ragsdale, Regional Dean Shuswap-Revelstoke, Okanagan College.

An online Info Night is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 25 at 6:30 p.m. Parents and students can meet instructors, find out about various career opportunities and ask questions about the program.

To sign up for the Info Night or learn about the program, visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/hca.



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