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Campus Life  

UBC biologist receives federal support to research egg industry sustainability

Endowed Chair in Bio-economy Sustainability Management, Egg Industry Chair in Sustainability

Endowed Chair in Bio-economy Sustainability Management, Egg Industry Chair in Sustainability

Industrial Research Chair partnership will advance sustainability measurement and management

As a leading Canadian expert in sustainability, UBC’s Nathan Pelletier has been awarded a prestigious Industrial Research Chair by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). The award will advance Pelletier’s research activities that focus on sustainability measurement and management, life-cycle thinking and resource efficiency, with an emphasis on the Canadian egg industry.

Pelletier, an assistant professor at UBC’s Okanagan campus, teaches in both the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences and the Faculty of Management. He has spent roughly a decade researching the science of sustainability, with a focus on food systems. Since 2016, he has collaborated with Egg Farmers of Canada as their Research Chair in Sustainability, exploring opportunities to improve resource efficiencies and reduce the environmental impact of egg supply chains.

“I am passionate about the development of food systems that are environmentally sustainable, economically viable and that contribute to our health and well-being,” says Pelletier. “Achieving this in modern food systems requires considering food supply chains in their entirety, from the beginning of production to the consumer’s end use of a product—in other words, a truly holistic evaluation of sustainability risks and opportunities.”

Only a handful of researchers are awarded an Industrial Research Chair from NSERC each year, making it a great honour for Pelletier, explained Marc Fortin, VP Research Partnerships at NSERC. This support will allow Pelletier to grow his research program as the first-ever NSERC/Egg Farmers of Canada Industrial Research Chair in Sustainability.

“NSERC’s Industrial Research Chair program provides for dynamic research and development collaborations between Canada’s brain trust and partners,” says Fortin. “We are proud to support this chair, which is developing the knowledge and supporting innovation necessary to advance the success of the sector and improve the sustainability of that production. The results this team will deliver could have broad benefits across Canada.”

“We are very proud that Nathan is doing his innovative work at UBC Okanagan,” says Phil Barker, Vice-Principal and Associate Vice-President, Research at UBC’s Okanagan campus. “His insights on sustainability and agriculture are benefiting industry, our community and the environment. This cutting-edge and relevant research will have direct impacts on our region and on global production methods. His work is a wonderful example of the outstanding and impactful research performed at UBC’s Okanagan campus."

“Food systems sustainability is a subject of increasing importance. Egg Farmers of Canada strives to promote innovation and the continuous improvement of egg production through the latest scientific research,” says Tim Lambert, CEO of Egg Farmers of Canada. “His work helps us understand the link between environmental sustainability and egg production, while developing processes and technologies with environmental and social impacts in mind.”

Local MP Stephen Fuhr also wanted to highlight the significance of the partnership and the good work coming out of UBC Okanagan.

“Food systems and sustainability are two topics that are very important to our government,” said Fuhr. “We know that partnerships like the one between UBC Okanagan’s Nathan Pelletier and Egg Farmers of Canada, supported by organizations like NSERC, lead to discoveries that benefit all Canadians.”

Marc Fortin, VP Research Partnerships at NSERC, Tim Lambert, CEO of Egg Farmers of Canada, Nathan Pelletier and UBC Okanagan’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Principal Deborah Buszard at this week’s funding announcement.

Marc Fortin, VP Research Partnerships at NSERC, Tim Lambert, CEO of Egg Farmers of Canada, Nathan Pelletier and UBC Okanagan’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Principal Deborah Buszard at this week’s funding announcement.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.

 



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Indigenous carving course takes shape at Okanagan College

Okanagan College Media Release

An internationally renowned master carver and Indigenous artist is setting up shop at Okanagan College this winter to pass on the traditional skills and knowledge he has honed over a 25-year career working with wood.

Darren McKenzie Jan 2018Darren McKenzie is a Cree and Métis artist from Vancouver. Fueled by a desire to inspire the next generation of carvers, he recently worked with the College to develop a new course – Indigenous Wood Sculpting – that will run from Feb. 2-18, and again from March 2-18, at the Kelowna campus.

“This course is a bit of a hybrid,” explains McKenzie, who began his career as an illustrator and painter before turning to carving in the early 1990s. “It will be a blend of traditional carving and Indigenous wood carving, but it’s going to be very open-ended. We’ll delve into any techniques and styles the students want to learn.”

The course will also cater to students of all skill levels.

“There will be something for everyone,” says McKenzie. “We’ll work through everything from basic drawing, design and carving, to some more advanced elements.”

McKenzie began carving in 1993 under the instruction of Salish Artist Gerry Sheena. He then went on to complete an intensive four-year apprenticeship with master carver Ken Mowatt at the ‘Ksan Historical Village and Museum in Hazelton, B.C.
Darren McKenzie carving Jan 2018

His work has been displayed extensively at museums and galleries across North America over the past three decades, from the Museum of Arts and Design in New York to a solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of Regina to the Douglas Reynolds in Vancouver.

Throughout that time, McKenzie has remained committed to sharing what he has learned along the way with budding artists. He hopes this course might encourage new carvers to pick up the tools of his trade.

“I’m always excited to hang out with like-minded people and pass on my knowledge,” says McKenzie. “I hope everyone comes away inspired to keep on learning and keep on carving.”

The course runs Friday evenings and weekends. More information is available at okanagan.bc.ca/indigenouscarving

 




Water Engineering grad on road to success after College experience

Okanagan College Media Release

Brian Bjorkland Jan 2018With big goals to be part of the solution for a brighter environmental future in British Columbia, Brian Bjorkland enrolled in Okanagan College’s Water Engineering Technology program and is now among 427 students receiving their credentials at the College’s first convocation ceremony of 2018.

Saturday’s graduation ceremony will see Bjorkland receive a diploma in front of family and friends, but it won’t be the first time he has crossed the stage. After earning a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Biology in 2013 from Thompson Rivers University, Bjorkland knew he would have more career options if he specialized in his field.

“I knew I had to get another credential on top of my degree to give myself the best chance of standing out from the masses and getting a good job,” says Bjorkland. “I chose to enrol in the Water Engineering Tech program because of the program’s history and reputation and most importantly because it had a co-op component.”

Bjorkland was hired in his first year as a co-op student at the City of Surrey and was responsible for monitoring, completing maintenance and responding to alarms for the various pumping stations throughout the city. He was the first OC student to work for the City of Surrey and was invited back to complete his second co-op term with the same employer.

“The experience and skills I got with the City of Surrey was invaluable – it was really a unique job and actually helped me choose the environmental monitoring focus in my second year,” explains Bjorkland. “I was obviously expecting to enjoy that focus area because I chose it, but I wasn’t expecting to uncover a new passion for the biology of insects and plants in fresh water.”

The two-and-a-half-year program offers two streams of specialization for second-year students, water and wastewater technology and environmental monitoring – both of which see students spend more time wading in a creek than in a classroom chair.

“I loved that the classes in this program were so interesting and interactive,” says Bjorkland. “The instructors were great, it was an awesome learning environment and my fellow students were all really good people and I’ve made some friendships for life.”

Winter convocation is the first of the College’s eight ceremonies that take place this year. Students from all four campuses will cross the stage at the Kelowna campus to receive their credentials. The College will confer 79 Bachelor’s degrees, 11 Associate degrees, 231 diplomas and 106 certificates.

The morning ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. and the afternoon ceremony at noon. Both ceremonies will stream live on the College’s Facebook page: facebook.com/okanagancollege.ca.

 




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New research finds that mould can infiltrate and weaken bio-composite materials

UBC researcher Bryn Crawford holds a sample sheet made with flax bio-waste. The black spots on the sheet indicate mould growth.

UBC researcher Bryn Crawford holds a sample sheet made with flax bio-waste. The black spots on the sheet indicate mould growth.

Mould on a substance will affect its strength and durability

When something goes mouldy in the fridge, it is annoying and wasteful.

However, at UBC Okanagan’s School of Engineering, mould is proving increasingly important in the domain of engineering materials and can lead to early deterioration and structural failure. This is especially the case as manufacturers adopt more bio-derived materials in the drive towards a greener future, explains researcher Bryn Crawford.

At UBC’s Okanagan campus, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from the Composites Research Network and the Department of Biology, in collaboration with MIT and the National Research Council of Canada, have been studying the development and application of bio-sourced composites—specifically flax and hemp fibres. These materials are plentiful in Canada and can be mixed with other materials to create cheaper, recyclable, and effective composite material products that are used by a range of industries, including in transportation.

“Canada has a lot of biomass that can be used to produce materials that are both light and inexpensive,” explains Crawford. “We’re looking at ways of using biomass in engineering, but there is a level of natural deterioration in these products that is still not fully understood.”

In the study, researchers conducted a number of experiments to determine if and when mould will grow on bio-materials and how it might affect the final product.

“When we bring microbiology into engineering, it raises some extra questions; some questions we’ve never thought about before,” says Crawford. “But because we’re now using biological matter, we have to think of fungal growth and how this fungal growth will affect a product.”

The research team examined flax and hemp fibres alongside other natural materials to determine what would happen over time to these fibres. They created ‘fibre sheets’ and then added fungi to some, water to others, and left another group of sheets untreated.

Crawford says they are not surprised that the materials grew mould; the idea of the project was to determine the types of environment where the fungal spores would grow and then test mechanical properties of the affected materials. The team conducted a variety of tests examining them for strength, stiffness, or the amount of energy that can be absorbed before the materials failed. They also used scanning electron microscopy to take an extreme close-up of the interior of the sample to determine fungal growth patterns, examine fractures, and failure zones.

“It was a huge experiment and we found that in both the hemp and flax fibres, when no fungi were added, we still had fungi growing,” Crawford adds. “Basically, when raw natural fibres are exposed to high relative humidity, mould will grow and the potential for premature structural failure can occur.”

Crawford says that this susceptibility to mould growth is important for supply chains and factories to understand and manage in order to ensure they’re creating robust products.

“Bio-composites made from natural fibres are good for both the environment and the economy and could help usher in the next revolution in manufacturing. More inter-disciplinary research of this kind is vital to producing high-quality and durable bio-materials that help make that leap.”

The research was recently published in Materials and was partially funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Fonds de recherche du Québec—Nature et technologies. It was conducted in collaboration with Sepideh Pakpour, Negin Kazemian, John Klironomos, Karen Stoeffler, Denis Rho, Joanne Denault and Abbas Milani.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



Abrupt end to exercise not the answer when it comes to eating disorder treatment

Photo of two apples for media release

People with eating disorders need to find healthful relationships with exercise

UBC researcher Danika Quesnel says telling people who are undergoing treatment for an eating disorder to completely abstain from exercise can be detrimental to the patient’s recovery and long-term health.

Quesnel’s research has determined that the traditional prescription to treat an eating disorder—encouraging people to refrain from exercise—may not be as effective as initially believed. In fact, it could be potentially detrimental to long-term prognosis.

Quesnel, who completed this research while an interdisciplinary student in UBC Okanagan’s School of Health and Exercise Sciences and the psychology department, says there is a definite disconnect when it comes to how much exercise should be allowed for people with an eating disorder. In fact, there is no simple “one size fits all” recommendation.

Quesnel interviewed a number of eating disorder health professionals throughout North America and Europe. She says it’s common for someone with an eating disorder to have a dysfunctional relationship with exercise.

“Dysfunctional exercise behaviour, meaning someone who has an abusive relationship with exercise, is present in around 30 to 80 per cent of patients with eating disorders,” says Quesnel. “However, the exercise behaviours are not commonly addressed when that person is being treated for an eating disorder. In fact, people are often told to stop exercising. Period.”

While it is hard to monitor and ensure that a patient is not engaging in inappropriate exercise when they have been recommended not to, Quesnel says it’s more complicated than that.

“It’s not a realistic option. Both clinical and research experts can agree on that,” she says. “What we should be doing is developing guidelines to incorporate healthy amounts of exercise into the treatment so we can help patients develop long-term, appropriate relationships with exercise.”

Ideally, Quesnel says a person being treated for an eating disorder, should be encouraged to take a break in the activity they are they overdoing. For example, someone who compulsively runs could eventually be encouraged to try a different activity or a team sport.

“It’s an emerging topic, one that is on the minds of many, yet little information is available,” she says. “How much is the right amount? There needs to be a gradual protocol that begins in treatment and needs to be based on the patient’s physical health, activity goals and preference. The ultimate goal is that they develop a healthy lifestyle around physical activity beyond the context of treatment.”

It’s also important, she says, to tailor the activity to each individual and introduce flexibility, strength training and then cardiovascular exercises in stages which a patient progresses through based on their health.

“Exercise prescription can be tricky in the context of eating disorder treatment,” she says. “These are people who have very dysfunctional relationships with exercise. We need to help patients develop a   healthy relationship with exercise, just as we help them improve their relationships with food. We need to be able to give them an exercise program that matches with their treatment goals and one they can follow for the long term.”

Quesnel’s research was published recently in Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



UBC’s fine arts studios open for Portfolio Day and Creative Days

UBC instructor Katherine Pickering reviews Bachelor of Fine Arts student Matthew Glenn’s portfolio.

UBC instructor Katherine Pickering reviews Bachelor of Fine Arts student Matthew Glenn’s portfolio.

Prospective students can earn feedback on their portfolio or learn about course options

What: Portfolio Day and Creative Days at UBC Okanagan
Who: Prospective students for UBC’s Visual Arts BFA program
When: Portfolio Day is Saturday, January 13, from 10 a.m. to noon; Multiple dates for Creative Days
Where: Creative and Critical Studies building, 1148 Research Road, UBC’s Okanagan Campus

UBC Okanagan’s Faculty of Creative and Critical studies is encouraging artists, interested fine arts options at the university, to show off their talent.

Portfolio Day is an opportunity for people interested in the program to come to campus and get pointers—in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere—on how to put together a good portfolio. They will also receive feedback about their work and advice about how to take their talent further.

Prospective applicants should bring no more than 10 artworks or images, and (or) up to three short videos which illustrate their best work while showing a range of explored media. Original artwork including finished pieces, works in progress, and sketchbooks are preferred. Prospective students can also present a digital portfolio on a laptop.

Portfolio day is an opportunity to get advice on building an entrance portfolio and obtain pre-approval for the portfolio requirement as part of your application to the Visual Arts BFA program at UBC Okanagan.

Meanwhile, there are four Creative Days Workshops planned for the coming months. These events, specifically for prospective applicants to the Visual Arts Bachelor of Fine Arts Program or anyone interested in pursuing visual arts courses at UBC’s Okanagan campus, provide a chance to learn about the program and campus facilities through fun, hands-on projects.

Participants will work with faculty and staff, and have the chance to meet and talk with current students about program choices. Seats are limited for some of the sessions, so pre-registration is encouraged. To register, contact Visual Arts program coordinator Briar Craig at [email protected] or 250 807-9765.

  • Saturday, Jan 13 | noon to 3 p.m. with Fern Helfand
    Photography – Lighting for Studio Portraits
  • Saturday, February 17 | noon to 2 p.m. with Myron Campbell
    Frame-by-Frame Animation
  • Saturday, March 17 | 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. with Renay Egami
    Sculpture: Mold Making & Casting
  • Saturday, April 21 | 10 a.m. to noon with Stephen Foster
    Interactive Digital Media

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



Winner declared in Okanagan College 3-Hour Short Story contest

Okanagan College Media Release

More than 30 budding writers from across the valley put their writing skills to the test in Okanagan College’s 8th Annual 3-Hour Short Story contest and second-year arts student Hannah Stanley has been announced as the overall winner for her original story “The Best Years of Our Lives.”Hannah Stanley Dec 2017

The 180-minute timed contest was held last month at the College’s Vernon, Salmon Arm and Penticton campuses and at Kelowna Secondary School. The contest was open to Grade 11, 12 and College students who competed for four regional prizes of $250 in tuition credit. From the regional winners, an overall winner was selected to win an additional $500 credit and have their story published in a limited fine-print edition by Kalamalka Press.

“I woke up in the morning feeling very uninspired and I went into the contest without any prior story ideas or anything worked out in my head in advance,” says Stanley. “It actually wasn’t until the clock started and I heard the mystery phrase that I found inspiration and knew what I was going to write about.”

The contest challenges authors to integrate a mystery phrase, revealed at the start of the competition, into their stories. This year’s phrase, “frozen fish sticks,” immediately gave Stanley an image from her childhood of eating fish sticks and ketchup straight off the table, without a plate.

Her winning story is loosely based on her childhood experiences and is told from a child’s perspective about what life was like one year when, unknown to Stanley, her mother was experiencing depression.

“The goal of the story is to kind of take away the stigma of parents with a mental illness like depression who are worried they’re not a good enough parent or are somehow ruining their children’s lives,” explains Stanley. “The child doesn’t notice anything wrong with her mother and actually finds it to be one of the best years of her childhood because she gets to eat unlimited freezies, has tons of sleepovers and finds eating without plates or cutlery incredibly fun.”

Stanley’s story was one of many captivating narratives from the contest which drew out a diverse group of authors aged 16 to 43.

“We saw a large age span this year from previous years which added a lot of interest and made the competition pretty close – it was tough to choose just one overall winner,” says Dr. Sean Johnson, contest organizer and English professor at the College. “There is almost a 30-year age difference between the regional winners which just goes to show the uniqueness of this competition, that regardless of age anyone can win.”

Darby McEachern-Corley was declared the Salmon Arm regional winner for “The Eyes Never Lie,” Dawn Naas’s “Un-Fragmenting Thoughts” was selected as the Vernon regional winner and Parker Arcand took home the Penticton regional award for “Hearts of Metal and Ice.”

This year’s winning stories can be read online at www.okanagan.bc.ca/3hourwriting

 




Distinguished Alumnus Ben Klick to headline weekend of concerts at OC

Okanagan College Media Release

Ben Klick Jan 2017Okanagan College is kicking off 2018 with a weekend of musical entertainment featuring some of Kelowna’s outstanding local talent, including alumnus and award-winning country music artist Ben Klick.

A 2017 recipient of Okanagan College’s Young Alumni Award, Klick will once again bring his twist of modern country music to the OC stage following an incredibly successful year for the singer/songwriter. With a newly released single “That’s Who I Wanna Be” and fresh off receiving the 2017 Country Club Act of the Year Award at the 41st Annual British Columbia Country Music Association (BCCMA) Awards, Klick’s performance will headline the College’s annual Audio Engineering and Music Production (AEMP) show. 

Klick, and the supporting act “Under the Rocks,” will perform on Saturday Jan. 13 as part one of a two-part concert series put on by the College’s AEMP students.

“As part of our live sound module, we are given this opportunity to act as audio engineers and show the community what we have been working on,” says Nina Greschner, who is a student in the program. “This is a chance for us to work together as a team and get hands-on experience in a real life setting.”

On Friday, Jan. 12, the night before Klick’s show, two popular opening acts – My Dudes and Fated Sons – will hit the stage for the aptly titled Rock, Paper Scissors, ROCK! concert. The high-energy entertainers will be followed by headliner Rosebone, a local duo who bring a modern twist on a vintage sound and a unique style of storytelling through their songs.

The student organized concerts raise funds for bursaries for future AEMP students to attend the program and are curricula for one of the modules of the certificate program.

Doors to the lecture theatre at the Kelowna campus will be opening at 6:30 p.m. each of the nights, with the two-hour shows starting promptly at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 each ($10 with a valid student I.D.), and are available at okanagan.bc.ca/aemp
, and at the door.

 



College chefs help prepare for a flavourful Christmas

Okanagan College Media Release

Okanagan College Chef Bernard Casavant, Chef Mike Barillaro and 14 culinary arts students are putting their talents and training to work as they help prepare a delicious community Christmas dinner.Chef B Dec 2017

When Chef Adam Relvas (owner of Relvas Catering and a College alumnus and Victory Life Fellowship volunteer), approached the College several years ago to help with the dinner, the College chefs saw it as a perfect opportunity to give the first-year culinary class an education in preparing the popular holiday-time bird.

“There’s nothing like giving students real-life training especially for an amazing cause like this,” says Casavant. “You should have seen the students’ eyes when Chef Mike and I wheeled out the cart with the 25 turkeys on it.”

The dinner is hosted by Victory Life Church at the Parkinson Recreational Centre and has been running for 14 years. Victory Life is anticipating it will help feed more than 500 people this year. Two dinner seatings are planned to serve the crowds, thanks to an endless team of volunteers.

“This entire event is made possible thanks to volunteers,” explains Casavant. “The turkeys were donated by Victory Life Fellowship and together with Chef Adam and the 14 students we’ve been making the stuffing and cooking the turkeys and Chef Mike worked his magic with the gravy.”

The dinner is open to everyone; the driving belief is that no one should be alone on Christmas. Those attending will be treated to a flavourful turkey dinner with all the trimmings, gift bags, door prizes, games and live entertainment.

For more information, visit www.victorylife.ca/christmas-day-dinner
.

 



Scholarship supports post-secondary transfer students at Okanagan College

Okanagan College Media Release

Jake Tourand Dec 2017Merritt’s Jake Tourand moved to Kelowna to attend Okanagan College this fall with some significant help – $5,000 of it – thanks to the Irving K. Barber Scholarship Society’s Transfer award.

Making a similar move was Lindsay Booth who completed her Associate of Science diploma at the College’s Salmon Arm campus and has now found her way to UBC Okanagan to complete a Bachelor’s degree with the same $5,000 award.

Tourand and Booth are among 163 post-secondary students in British Columbia who received a helping hand from the transfer scholarship which eases the costs for students transferring to another institution to complete their degree.

“This scholarship has made for an easy transition to a new school and new city,” says Tourand, who recently completed two years at the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology. “I was juggling two jobs while going to school and because of the award I didn’t feel the stress to find a job the moment I moved to Kelowna – I can focus more on school for once.”

Tourand is working towards his Bachelor of Business Administration degree specializing in Human Resources Management. U
pon graduation, he is looking forward to a career working with Indigenous people in a human resources or community-facing role.
Lindsay Booth Dec 2017
“I wasn’t sure what to expect from the College because I came from a really small school but I have to say I couldn’t have asked for a better experience here – the class sizes are good, my professors are great and everyone is really friendly,” says Tourand. “The College also gave me full credit for all of my completed courses which I didn’t find at other schools I applied to.”

Okanagan College is well known for its small class sizes and engaging professors, something Booth will certainly miss.

“My plan was always to start at the College, get my diploma and then go on to complete my degree,” explains Booth. “I watched a lot of friends go straight to UBCO from high school and really struggle with 300-person classes, busy professors and coursework expectations.

“I was lucky to stay at home for the first two years of school and am even more lucky to have this scholarship because it made the move to Kelowna and paying for my third year much easier – science text books are expensive!”

Applications for the 2018 Ike Barber Transfer Scholarships are now available. To find more information and to apply, visitwww.ikbbc.ca
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