Civic Election 2018  

Hurd out of mayor's race

Ernie Hurd has removed his name from the list of those seeking the mayor's chair in Peachland.

And, he's throwing his support behind incumbent Cindy Fortin.

Hurd, a former Peachland councillor, informed the municipality Friday he would be dropping out of the race. That was the last day declared candidates could have their name removed from the ballot.

In a Facebook post, Hurd wrote:

"I read Nick Walsh's letter in today's View and thought to myself, WTF am I doing this for? I am officially no longer a candidate. Yea, I don't have to listen to Dave Preston of (deleted) Menzies. I am free to drink and smoke weed. I am throwing my support to Cindy Fortin. Cindy is the only one strong enough to take on the Beach Avenue idiots."

Hurd started a Facebook group, An Unbiased Peachland Votes 2018, after claiming he was kicked off two other Facebook groups, Peachland Neighbors and Peachland Votes 2018, for comments he made on those pages.

The removal of Hurd from the ballot leaves five people in the race for mayor. Keith Thom, Eric Hall, Harry Gough and Bob Henderson are all running to unseat Fortin.

The major issue in the Peachland election surrounds council's decision to allow a five-storey development on Beach Avenue. The move led to outrage by a segment of the population who, at one time, went to court to block the move.

That court action has now been dropped.

Calls to Hurd for comment have not been returned.



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Williamson in for trustee

Tom Williamson has 40 years of experience in School District #22 and now wants to utilize that experience by running for school trustee in Vernon.

Williamson taught for 30 years at Kalamalka and Vernon Secondary School. 

Williamson built a solid reputation for his involvement in both community and school sports including coaching hockey, basketball, track and field, and golf along with running 

After his teaching years, Williamson became School. District #22 Career Coordinator for all high schools in Vernon and Lumby for ten years. 

Williamson co-facilitated a number of specific programs including: 

  • Developed with Okanagan College the first ITA Dual Credit Certificate program in CNC (Computer Numeric Control) delivered at VSS
  • ACE IT (accelerated credit education industry training) – students work with Industry Training Authority for dual credit apprenticeship training, technical and work based
  • Secured $30,000.00 in funding from ITA for Automotive Trade Sampler and Construction Trade sampler programs supported in kind by Canadian Tire, Fisher’s Hardware and Dewalt tools
  • Secured $50,000.00 in funding from Skills Canada for the support of the ACE IT Professional Cook 1 program at VSS

The municipal election is October 20, 2018.



Who is running in RDNO

The municipal election is October 20, 2018.

In the Regional District of North Okanagan, two electoral areas have seen their directors acclaimed, while the three other areas will head to the polls. 

In Electoral Area "B" voters will have a choice between incumbent Bob Flemming and Myles McGovern.

In Electoral Area "C" voters will choose between Amanda Shatzko and Mike Randall. 

In Electoral Area "F" voters will choose between Denis Delisle and Lori Heins. 

Both Rick Fairbairn from Electoral Area "D" and Hank Cameron from Electoral Area "E" have been acclaimed.





Election forums this week

Voters in Penticton will have a number of chances to interact with candidates for next month’s municipal elections.

Three days of candidates forums kick off Tuesday at the Penticton Lakeside, starting with a debate for school trustees on Sept. 25. A mayoral forum takes place Wednesday and council candidates take the stage Thursday. The action starts at 7 p.m. each day.

The Penticton and Wine Country Chamber of Commerce is holding a meet and greet Oct. 1 from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Days Inn Riverside Conference Centre.

For that event, voters will be split into groups with each candidate for rotating discussions. The chamber says pre-registration is required at 778.476.3111.

The South Okanagan Seniors Wellness Society is hosting an all candidates meeting on Oct. 3 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Seniors Drop In Centre.

Watch Castanet for coverage of each event, along with profiles and interviews with all the South Okanagan candidates for mayor, council, school trustee and rural directors that will begin going up on site later this week.



Advice for all candidates

By Norm Letnick

It’s that time again when we have an opportunity to directly select our representatives for municipal government and school board. Having served at both the municipal and provincial level I frequently get asked for advice on how to run an election so I would like to thank the media for sharing my thoughts with all interested.

  • Be positive and constructive. Yes, with any government there is always more that can be done and improved upon but with limited resources politics are about making tough choices and never giving up fighting for what you believe in. You should also be aware of which level of government is responsible for what services. Take for example the current pressure on inner-cities by people with social or advanced health needs across North America. In Canada most of the responsibility to address these challenges falls within provincial jurisdiction with support from communities, as well as local and federal governments. 
  • Know what the voters want. You are in the service business so your first task is to ask your ‘clients’ what they need/want. Only after you’ve connected with voters at the door, by phone, email, social media, etc and asked them what your priorities should be if you’re elected can you have a reasonable understanding of the direction they want you to steer the ship. No matter how many doors you knock on you can never reach everyone so be sure they can reach you.
  • The next campaign begins the day after you get elected. Stay in contact with your community through all the same methods that got you the job. Trust takes time to build, is easily lost and difficult, yet not impossible, to be regained. Be present in your community and keep looking for new ways to serve and improve the lives of your constituents. Don’t be afraid to communicate disappointing news either. Not every want or need can be satisfied in every community all the time. People want to know you are aware of an issue, share their concern, and are doing your best to address it. They need to know you are fighting for them and their community.
  • Ask yourself why people should place their trust in you. How have you previously served them? Can they have comfort you are going to serve their and our community’s best interests and not your own agenda? If the answers come back short maybe now is not the time for you to run. Get more life and service experience.
  • Thank those who support you, but always remember you are one vote shy of winning until all the ballots are counted. After running in a dozen elections in my lifetime I’ve can attest to that the old saying is true, you learn more from the failures than the successes and what I learned thankfully a long time ago is you need a team to work with you on campaigns. Door knocking, sign installation and maintenance, advertising, answering surveys, making phone calls, updating social media, the list is endless. Surround yourself with workers and people who will challenge you to push harder.
  • Win or lose on election night, celebrate with your friends, family, and especially your campaign workers. Losing can be hard but the relationships you build during a campaign can last you a lifetime and in the end you will have no regrets for doing your best and gaining some new friends in the process.

Norm Letnick is the MLA for Kelowna-Lake Country and has served nearly 20 years in government with half as a municipal councillor and half as an MLA and provincial minister.



Art Gourley

Art Gourley

Mayor of Vernon candidate.

1) Why should voters cast a ballot for you October 20? 

Because of my experience in life, 75 years old.

2) What would you consider the City of Vernon’s greatest strengths and weaknesses, and why?

Nice weather plus lakes (strength) poorly managed city (weakness)

3) What is the biggest issue facing the City of Vernon; as a member of the Vernon City Council, how would you work to address this issue?

The biggest issue facing the city of Vernon/ how to address the issue
homeless people/supply shelters

4) How do you see the future of the cannabis industry in the City of Vernon after legalization?

Not good news and people will start smoking again (cigs)

5) Where do you stand on the Greater Vernon Cultural Centre; Should up to $25 million be borrowed for a new cultural centre in Vernon's downtown core, and why?

*The exact wording of the referendum question has not yet been released.

New city hall first, then talk about the centre.

6) Where do you stand on electoral reform; Should the province change from its current first past the post electoral system to proportional representation, and why?

Why change things if they work.

7) Is there a current candidate for council or mayor you would like to see elected Oct. 20, and why?

The East Indian girl, Dalvir is nice plus smart.



Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Vernon City Council candidate

1) Why should voters cast a ballot for you October 20?

Because they'll get someone who tells them what I believe to be true and not what I think they want to hear.

2) What would you consider the City of Vernon’s greatest strengths and weaknesses, and why?

Strengths: One of the best CAO and Deputy CAOs in the industry; natural beauty; friendly people. 

Weaknesses: A tendency to want to avoid new ways of doing things.

3) What is the biggest issue facing the City of Vernon; as a member of the Vernon City Council, how would you work to address this issue?

There are numerous problems facing the city, and new ones that aren't even on our horizon yet will present themselves over the next few years. 

Rather than selecting one and pretending to know the definitive answer, I'll simply say that my experience suggests that a successful Councillor has to be able to make numerous, wide-ranging decisions, usually based on incomplete data, often several times a day. 

Hopefully while listening carefully to what the majority of citizens want.

4) How do you see the future of the cannabis industry in the City of Vernon after legalization?

Cannabis legalization is subject to federal jurisdiction, and regulation and distribution to provincial jurisdiction.

 I have all sorts of opinions on those jurisdictional issues, but from the point of view of a municipal candidate, and recognizing that municipalities only have a say through bylaws and permits (mostly having to do with location), I think we need to consult the folks who live here, using consultation mechanisms we have not yet used.

Those include both old-fashioned town halls and newer methods made available to us through technology. How do the citizens of Vernon want to deal with this new socio-economic frontier?

5) Where do you stand on the Greater Vernon Cultural Centre; Should up to $25 million be borrowed for a new cultural centre in Vernon's downtown core, and why?

*The exact wording of the referendum question has not yet been released.

That's a question for the taxpaying folks who will have to pay for it to decide. 

I will not presume to tell the citizens of Vernon what they ought to think about this expenditure. 

The referendum will decide that issue.

6) Where do you stand on electoral reform; Should the province change from its current first past the post electoral system to proportional representation, and why?

That's not a municipal issue. As a municipal candidate, what I think about it is irrelevant.

7) Is there a current candidate for council or mayor you would like to see elected Oct. 20, and why?

I'm not formally endorsing a mayoral candidate, because if elected I'll gladly work with whoever wins, but I would urge voters to look closely at which of the mayoral candidates has been actively engaged with both the business community and the city over the past four years in numerous capacities, who is making real efforts to gather opinions from citizens, who is actively campaigning as if they really want the job, and who is most able to make decisions, including hard decisions, for the overall good of the citizens of Vernon. 

On one hand, a mayor is only one vote among seven, but in a very real sense, an effective mayor needs to be an energetic leader.

Of the Councillor candidates, I have formally endorsed Jasmine Finlay and Sherrilee Franks.

Jasmine because she has a first-class mind, an ability to see two sides of an issue clearly and - because she's has taken time away from work to attend every Council meeting for two years - will be by far the non incumbent most prepared to step into the role of councillor.

She will be highly effective on Council. Sherillee because she is one of the most reasonable, intelligent, and capable people I know.

Having seen her work on two City-sponsored organizations, I have absolutely no doubt that she be a first-class councillor.

For the record, I'm well aware that neither Jasmine nor Sherrilee does, or will, see every issue in the same light as I do, but they are both rational, high-level thinkers willing and able to grasp complex ideas and see beyond the surface. Vernon will have more effective governance if they are elected.

 



Darrin Taylor

Darrin Taylor

Mayor of Vernon Candidate

1) Why should voters cast a ballot for you October 20?

Because they'll get a mayor who is ready to roll up his sleeves and work with council, taxpayers, businesses and other levels of government to ensure that the next generation inherits a vibrant, thriving Vernon. 

Voters can expect me to let them know where I stand instead of speaking in platitudes and clichés that they’ve become used to hearing from politicians.

2) What would you consider the City of Vernon’s greatest strengths and weaknesses, and why?

Strengths: We have a capable, professional, and dedicated staff at City Hall. The strength of Vernon is in the natural beauty, liveability and welcoming people that first drew me here 25 years ago.

Weaknesses: Our sense of humility in Vernon can hold us back from thinking big. I believe in the potential of this city to shine as the true jewel that it is.

3) What is the biggest issue facing the City of Vernon; as a member of the Vernon City Council, how would you work to address this issue?

The issues facing Vernon are numerous and will constantly be changing. I don’t believe it makes sense to identify one as somehow more important than the others. 

Pretending to hold the solutions in the palm of their hand is not something
any candidate should be doing. 

A vibrant, safe, thriving city where families, seniors, and small business can get ahead instead of merely getting by is what I will work for. 

My personal and professional leadership experience has been as someone capable of finding solutions through a willingness to have the difficult conversations about uncomfortable subjects. 

Working with the city council and instilling an atmosphere of respect and cooperation will be a leadership priority for me as Mayor.

4) How do you see the future of the cannabis industry in the City of Vernon after legalization?

Decriminalization of recreational cannabis is squarely within federal jurisdiction. Regulation and distribution legislation is up to the provincial government. 

The role of municipalities will be limited to licensing, zoning, locations, and permits. 

I would like to see the people who live and operate businesses in Vernon consulted. 

The legal cannabis industry has attracted entrepreneurs who are employing people and who probably ought to be provided with the same consideration as other controlled industries such as those selling alcohol or tobacco.

5) Where do you stand on the Greater Vernon Cultural Centre; Should up to $25 million be borrowed for a new cultural centre in Vernon's downtown core, and why?

*The exact wording of the referendum question has not yet been released.

Facilities like this can do a tremendous amount for community pride and the vibrancy of our city. It will be up to taxpayers to decide if now is the time to proceed. As part of my commitment to always let voters know where I stand on local issues, I can tell you that I will be voting YES on October 20th. 

6) Where do you stand on electoral reform; should the province change from its current first past the post electoral system to proportional representation, and why?

This not a municipal issue.

7) Is there a current candidate for council or mayor you would like to see elected Oct. 20, and why?

I'm not formally endorsing any candidates for council. 

As Mayor, I would be comfortable working with whoever gets elected. The next council will have many new faces representing a variety of backgrounds, each with a different skillset. 

As the Mayor represents but one vote among seven, I would encourage voters to carefully evaluate each council candidate’s vision for this city. 

A willingness to make bold decisions and consider trying new things is what I like to see in a candidate for council.



Erik Olesen

Erik Olesen

Mayor of Vernon Candidate

1) Why should voters cast a ballot for you October 20?

Residents of Vernon should be voting for a Mayor who is ready to work to effectively move the City of Vernon forward with a vision that incorporates the needs of the community with the growth of the economy. 

Our leadership needs to provide reliable services, build connections and put Vernon on a platform that inspires people to do business here while calling Vernon home.

We also need a Mayor who is willing to work hard to better the community, be respectful of the pocketbooks of the taxpayers and most importantly work collaboratively with City Councillors, Administration and City Staff to come up with proactive solutions to move the City of Vernon forward.

We need a Mayor who can exemplify all of these skills and abilities while maintaining the highest level of integrity to the team. 

The Mayor is 1 vote amongst a table of 7 that need to collectively produce policies that improve the lives of the people of the City of Vernon.

There is only one choice on October 20th that is willing to work for the taxpayers and work as a Team to provide the best solutions to moving the City of Vernon in a positive direction, that change and voice is only Erik Olesen as the next Mayor of Vernon.

2) What would you consider the City of Vernon’s greatest strengths and weaknesses, and why?

The greatest strengths Vernon has as a small community is the residents’ passion to see the City grow, the diversity of the City, and the local businesses that are the heart of the community and tourism.

These strengths are such key parts to building a strong economy as well as attracting new families and businesses to Vernon. 

We see residents daily talking about ways they want to see their community grow and their passion to do what they can to help that process. 

Our community no matter where you look shares the joys of the City with many people regardless of their race, sexual orientation or beliefs. This all can be accounted for the residents, local leaders, community organizations, seniors who helped shape our City, businesses that come here and the list goes on. 

We all work daily for a better Vernon in some aspect and that’s why we have such amazing strengths. 

As for weaknesses, the City of Vernon’s biggest challenge is the need for more family orientated facilities and attractions to draw people into calling Vernon home. 

No matter who I speak to the wants are consistent for Arts and Culture, Multi-use Family Center that includes a pool and support for activities for children/youth. 

As for why it has been overlooked, I will not disparage the current administration but what I would say is that it is a challenge from residents that Council, Administration and City Staff need to continue to focus on.

3) What is the biggest issue facing the City of Vernon; as a member of the Vernon City Council, how would you work to address this issue?

The biggest issue and in my opinion the number one election topic is homelessness, drug addiction and housing as that is what I hear from anyone I speak to. 

We have been provided with a good amount of money, approximately $40 million, that has been invested in our community to deal with some of these issues.

My approach is to be proactive in continuing to secure funding from the province and thoroughly researching how that money can be best spent to provide sustainable solutions and real change. 

My work over this campaign to become Mayor has included reaching out to people directly involved in these issues. 

I have spoken with Mayor Clugston of the City of Medicine Hat, AB which is homelessness free. 

I have spoken with the Executive Assistant to the Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction Shane Simpson. 

I have toured Turning Points and the Mission in Vernon, met with Julia Payson Executive Director of CMHA, toured People Place, and met with Executive Director of the DVA Susan Lehman. 

I have also planned meetings or calls with IHA, Ministry of Mental Health and Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. This effort and attitude of no-stone-left-unturned are what I will bring to the council on how to proactively address an issue that affects many communities across our country. 

If we want a solution to the problem we need to involve all of the stakeholders in the process.

4) How do you see the future of the cannabis industry in the City of Vernon after legalization?

I believe that the City of Vernon has done well with dealing with and creating policies around the legalization of cannabis since it was announced. 

However you feel about it, the cannabis industry will be a part of every community across the country including here in the City of Vernon. 

I believe that it’s important to understand that there are people in the community that are accepting of the legalization and people in the community that are not. But we also need to remember that this is a multimillion dollar industry that, as of October 17th, will be completely legal, and we should be very careful about turning business investment away. 

Distasteful or not, we as council and as a City need to make sure that we are all working together to incorporate a new industry into our community that allows for the opportunity for economic growth as well as respecting the opinions of the community as a whole.

5) Where do you stand on the Greater Vernon Cultural Centre; Should up to $25 million be borrowed for a new cultural centre in Vernon’s downtown core, and why?

*The exact wording of the referendum question has not yet been released.

The Greater Vernon Cultural Center is something I would like to see happen here in Vernon. Arts and Culture is what attracts families to a community.

We need to be able to share a space that exemplifies history, diversity and a community. It will allow groups additional space in the City of Vernon to be able to continue programs and activities in many areas which are essential to families/residents. 

It will become a place that is heavily used and I believe like many others that it is needed. 

I can’t stress enough that the residents need to look at the benefit to the community as the whole and not just through the metric of how it will affect them personally. 

We also need to remember that the plan is asking for taxpayers to allow the City of Vernon to borrow up to $25 million but with potential grants possibly it could be less. 

I would suggest that residents get informed and look online at the overall plan as a whole when making their decision on October 20th.

6) Where do you stand on electoral reform; Should the province change from its current first past the post electoral system to proportional representation, and why?

Electoral Reform has been a topic of discussion not only provincially but federally as well at one point. 

I believe that the current system of First Past the Post doesn’t allow for proper representation of communities nor representation of rural communities. 

As someone that has been in politics in some form over the last 14 years in two provinces, I support Proportional Representation for the sole purpose of allowing fair and equitable representation of all areas across our province.

7) Is there a current candidate for council or mayor you would like to see elected Oct. 20, and why?

I believe as a candidate for Mayor that being able to work with people and a team is key to being successful. 

The current slate of candidates for City Council all represent views of the community that are equally important to the democratic process. 

We are looking at one of the most diverse groups of candidates I have seen in a municipal election and it shows that our residents are looking for potential change that reflects the wants, needs and views of our always changing community. 

I believe there are stand-out candidates for council but it’s important that the Mayor is open to working with whoever the residents decide to send to Council on October 20th. 

I look forward to working with a new council to move the City of Vernon forward. 

We all put our names forward because we want to serve our community to affect positive change and I have absolute respect for everyone who has made the commitment to run in this election.



Victor Cumming

Victor Cumming

Mayor of Vernon Candidate

1) Why should voters cast a ballot for you October 20?

Vernon has been my home since 1992 when my wife Mary-Ann and I chose to move here with our four children. I could have moved my business anywhere in BC with access to a good airport. 

Vernon was our top choice. I attended high school in Penticton, getting to
know Vernon while taking on rivals in soccer, basketball, rugby, hockey and track. 

We moved here for the good schools, the wide variety of affordable extra-curricular activities, the breathtaking natural landscape, the job opportunities for my wife, and the strong sense of community we felt when we visited. 

Our family has thrived here, now with five grandchildren in the Valley. 

We know we are blessed to live here. I have worked for the past 35 + years as an economic and social development consultant all across Canada and internationally – with communities. 

My education and life’s work have
focused on assisting communities in developing opportunities for economic growth, social change and community transformation. I want to be of greater service to my community and bring my knowledge, skills and experience to the role as Mayor.

I understand how governments of all levels function and my experience include negotiating high-level agreements with Federal, Provincial, Municipal and Aboriginal governments and agencies. 

My skills include effectively engaging citizens, elected officials and businesses in working together for tangible, practical results.

The job of the Mayor is to build a team and facilitate effective decision making. 

Vernon is facing many challenges that will require a concerted effort and real results.

We can enhance Vernon as a place to live, do business and raise a family on a wide variety of income levels. 

Communities always face challenges – big and small – that never changes; but, on the flip side of that, communities always have opportunities to grow, to change and to prosper. 

The role of the Mayor and Council is to address both and to make the best
decisions possible. I know how to do that. I am committed to working full-time as your Mayor, to do the job with integrity and diligence, and to always choose a course of action that is fair and places the needs of the
citizens of Vernon first.


2) What would you consider the City of Vernon’s greatest strengths and weaknesses, and why?

Vernon’s greatest strengths are:

  • The physical geography and climate of our city including our location in the valley and our proximity to the lakes and mountains. These factors make Vernon a great place to live, work and build a business, and a great destination for tourists and visitors. The built infrastructure adds to the natural environment including the urban improvements, our cultural and recreational facilities and services including those in the nearby Silver Star, Ellison, and Kalamalka Lake Provincial Parks. These assets have successfully attracted, retained and sustained a wide variety of people.

 

  • The diversity and stability of our economic base: Vernon is not dependant on one industry or sector of the economy. Continuing to build on this strength is essential in the coming years. The economic diversity has enabled Vernon to grow and prosper when significant change is thrust upon it by external forces in many different sectors and sub-sectors over time.

 

  • The commitment and effort of many high-quality individuals and groups from here, and attracted to here, who work towards building a livable, vibrant, small city with social, cultural and recreational assets and a strong economic base of small and larger businesses. It is the citizens of Vernon, all citizens, that contribute to its vibrancy. It is their involvement and inspiration when encouraged and enhanced that form the solid active foundation of the community and region. 

Vernon’s greatest weaknesses are:

  • The lack of attainable housing for those in the lower 60% of income levels. The current lack of attainable housing for those on modest or low incomes creates a whole list of problems for individuals, families and employers.

 

  • The spread-out infrastructure, e.g. roads, water and sewage system, with low or unoccupied areas. The spread-out infrastructure is expensive for the city to maintain, e.g. snow plowing, and replace, e.g. roads, water pipes, street lights, and sidewalks while there is very limited tax revenue to support the required services. The spread-out infrastructure creates higher taxes, fees, and replacement costs including DCCs (Development Cost Charges).

 

  • Consistent with all western Canadian cities, Vernon is struggling to address the impacts of the opioid crisis and the divestment in housing and services for seniors, low-income individuals and those with mental illness by both the Federal and Provincial governments over the past 25 years. These problems did not arise overnight and they will only be solved through concerted efforts and investments by all levels of government.


3) What is the biggest issue facing the City of Vernon; as a member of the Vernon City Council, how would you work to address this issue?

The biggest challenge the City faces right now is the lack of affordable/attainable housing.

This issue has to be addressed head-on in order for our city and our region to:

  • strengthen and stabilize our current community,
  • effectively address the problem of homelessness and marginally housed citizens, many of whom are seniors, and
  • take advantage of economic development opportunities.

Almost every city and town in the province is facing this same challenge. 
We have to work directly with the Federal and Provincial government to access capital support. 

We have to engage private developers as partners in building affordable homes for individuals and families. We have to continue to successfully partner with non-profit agencies who have been at the forefront of providing housing to our most marginalized citizens.

What the City must do is rethink our planning guidelines and development regulations to ensure the cost of development is not an impediment to building affordable housing. 

In critical components, the City will need to get directly involved as a current landowner, service provider and guiding the institution to create and ensure there is housing for those with
modest incomes.

Other cities have had some success in reducing the number of people living on the street and we have to learn from their practices and continue to take prompt action involving our partners.

The relatively high cost of the spread-out infrastructure limits the City’s flexibility to directly contribute to the attainable housing within the current tax base and rates. 

As infill takes place along these infrastructure corridors, and modest increases in density in built areas, the City’s financial flexibility will improve enabling it to increase its contribution to addressing these types of critical issues facing the community.

4) How do you see the future of the cannabis industry in the City of Vernon after legalization?

My expectation is that all cannabis businesses follow Federal and Provincial legislation and adhere to local business bylaws and zoning regulations. 

The City of Vernon has been working on establishing zoning bylaws that determine the density and location of retail outlets for quite some time. I would support enforcement of the Federal and Provincial legislation
and the local bylaws in the same manner as other laws and regulations.

5) Where do you stand on the Greater Vernon Cultural Centre; Should up to $25 million be borrowed for a new cultural centre in Vernon's downtown core, and why?

*The exact wording of the referendum question has not yet been released.

I am now a supporter of the Greater Vernon Culture Centre Proposal. During an earlier proposal that I carefully reviewed, I was not a supporter because of both the capital and operating requirements had not been clearly thought out. I now believe that the concept as it has been proposed with shared financing between Greater Vernon taxpayers and senior levels of government will be good value for money spent creating solid social and economic benefits for the community.

6) Where do you stand on electoral reform; Should the province change from its current first past the post electoral system to proportional representation, and why?

This question is about provincial jurisdiction and not municipal. It is not in the mandate for local governments as per the Community Charter. Therefore, I leave this question for provincial forums.

7) Is there a current candidate for council or mayor you would like to see elected Oct. 20, and why?

If I am elected Mayor of Vernon, I would like a council of bright, focused individuals who are able to provide the time and consistent effort to deal effectively with the significant municipal mandate issues. I would like to work with individuals who understand the broad spectrum of needs and desires of all who are resident or own property in the City and are able to bring balance to discussions and decisions.



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