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Dead bird flying

Newly published research says two of Canada's most commonly used pesticides cause migrating songbirds to lose weight and their sense of direction.

"This is very good evidence that even a little dose — incidental, you might call it — in their feeding could be enough to have serious impacts," said University of Saskatchewan biologist Christy Morrissey, whose paper was published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports.

Morrissey studied the effect of two widely used pesticide types — neonicotinoids and organochlorines. Both are used on more than 100 different crops, including wheat and canola, and are found in dozens of commercial products.

The so-called neonics are often applied to seeds before they're planted in the ground. Organochlorines are applied in tiny granules.

Both are known to be lethal to birds in large doses, but Morrissey wanted to study the impact of smaller amounts.

She and her colleagues took three groups of white-crowned sparrows, a common migratory songbird found throughout North America, and exposed them to a small dose, a somewhat larger dose, or no dose at all.

All doses were kept deliberately small. The low neonic dose was the equivalent of four treated canola seeds per day for three days — about one per cent of the bird's diet.

The results were dramatic.

After three days, the low-dose birds lost 17 per cent of their weight. The high-dose birds lost 25 per cent.

The birds exposed to organochlorines kept their weight, but they lost something else — their ability to find north. Both the high-dose and low-dose group lost all orientation and didn't get it back after the tests ended.

"In the real world, any bird that experiences these effects is pretty much a dead bird," she said.

Neonics have already been blamed for steep drops in bee populations.



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