Sunday, August 2nd31.8°C
26264
27169

TSX and the fiscal cliff

The Toronto stock market was lower Tuesday amid relief that there was a clear-cut winner from Tuesday's U.S. presidential election, with Barrack Obama winning a solid majority of electoral college votes over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

But that sentiment was tempered by the realization that there will likely be some tough slogging ahead as Democrats and Republicans try to extricate the government from automatically imposing tax hikes and steep spending cuts at the end of the year. Investors worry this so-called fiscal cliff scenario would send the U.S. back into recession.

The S&P/TSX composite index fell 82.91 points to 12,278.29 as Canadian investors also absorbed earnings reports from the resource and industrial sectors, with several heavyweights missing estimates.

The TSX Venture Exchange was 4.34 points lower to 1,298.8.

The Canadian dollar was down 0.16 of a cent to 100.67 cents US as commodities backtracked and traders took in another reminder of the fragile state of Europe's economy while looking ahead to a crucial vote in the Greek parliament later in the day.

New York markets were deep in the red as the Dow Jones industrials tumbled 174.56 points to 13,071.12, the Nasdaq composite index dropped 37.94 points to 2,973.99 while the S&P 500 index fell 19.21 points to 1,409.18.

There had been concern that America would have to endure a re-run of the protracted election of 2000.

But its arms of government remain divided, with the Democrats holding onto their majority in the Senate and the Republicans in control of the House of Representatives. That could still lead to a logjam in policymaking, not least over the state of the country's public finances.

"In other words, it's like nothing ever happened," observed Andrew Pyle, investment adviser at ScotiaMcLeod in Peterborough, Ont.

Greece was also back in focus ahead of a crucial vote in its parliament later in the day that could determine whether the country stays in the eurozone. If lawmakers don't back a E$13.5 billion package of spending cuts and tax increases, the country faces the prospect of losing access to its bailout lifeline and potentially defaulting on its mountain of debt and leaving the monetary union.

The Canadian Press


Read more Business News




Recent Trending




Today's Market
S&P TSX14468.44+85.68
S&P CDNX594.31+6.01
DJIA17689.86-56.12
Nasdaq5128.28-0.50
S&P 5002103.84-4.79
CDN Dollar0.7634-0.0006
Gold1096.90+0.60
Oil47.53-1.69
Lumber252.10+0.50
Natural Gas2.883+0.062

 
Okanagan Companies
Pacific Safety0.17-0.01
Knighthawk0.010.00
QHR Technologies Inc1.42+0.00
Cantex0.035-0.005
Anavex Life Sciences0.9101+0.1101
Metalex Ventures0.05+0.00
Russel Metals19.40-0.05
Copper Mountain Mining0.79+0.01
Colorado Resources0.065+0.005
ReliaBrand Inc0.0049+0.0004
Sunrise Resources Ltd0.03+0.00
Mission Ready Services0.095-0.045
Decisive Dividend Corp2.55+0.05

 



25386

FEATURED Property
22158034713 MacKinnon Road
3 bedrooms 4 baths
$2,395,000
more details
image2image2image2
Click here to feature your property
Please wait... loading


Chasing ducks

Photo: Thinkstock.comWhen businessmen tell me that being low priced is the only way to stay in business, I am skeptical. Price is the simplest way for a consumer to compare and is overused as the basi...


Taking care of business

Photo: Thinkstock.comRetirement as a goal has changed a lot over the years. There was a time, it was the only goal. You’d punch the clock and count the years until you could stop punching that t...


Income from home equity

Photo: Thinkstock.comWhen retirement funds run low, seniors often ask if tapping into the equity in their home is the right way to retain financial independence. To see if this option might be a good ...

_





26370


Member of BC Press Council


26916