Sunday, September 21st6.0°C
23284

House approves bill letting airlines advertise pre-tax fares, over consumer complaints

WASHINGTON - The House rejected consumers' complaints and passed legislation Monday letting airline advertising emphasize the base price of tickets, before taxes and fees are added in a victory for U.S. airlines and their workers' unions.

The bipartisan legislation would roll back federal regulations that since 2012 have required ads to most prominently display the full ticket price. Under the bill, the base price would have to be the one most prominently shown in ads as long as taxes and fees are displayed separately, such as in footnotes or pop-up ads.

The measure was approved by voice vote, in which individual lawmakers' votes are not recorded. Such votes are used often for non-controversial bills, but they can also allow legislators avoid taking a public position on a touchy issue.

Groups representing airline passengers and companies that frequently rely on corporate travel say the bill's enactment would return the country to an earlier era of misleading and confusing advertising.

But the airlines — backed by unions representing pilots, mechanics and flight attendants — say including taxes and fees in their advertised prices hurts business and hides from consumers the extra costs that government imposes on air travel.

Supporters say the measure would make it clear to fliers just how much of a ticket's cost comes from federal taxes and fees. The chief sponsors — House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster, a Republican, and Rep. Peter DeFazio, a Democrat, — have named the bill the Transparent Airfares Act of 2014.

Critics say that title is Orwellian because the bill would actually make it less clear how much a ticket actually costs.

So far there is no companion bill in the Democratic-run Senate. It is unclear whether the legislation has much chance of enactment in the dwindling months of the current Congress.

Sen. Robert Menendez, a Democrat, has introduced legislation that would do the opposite of the House measure. It would turn the current regulations into law, and double — to $55,000 daily — fines imposed for violating the requirement.

The Canadian Press


Read more Business News

22416


Recent Trending




Today's Market
S&P TSX15265.35-200.19
S&P CDNX955.06-10.73
DJIA17279.7413.75
Nasdaq4593.426-13.637
S&P 5002010.40-0.96
CDN Dollar0.9126+0.0004
Gold1216.90-10.00
Oil92.45-0.62
Lumber329.00-0.90
Natural Gas3.911-0.064

 
Okanagan Companies
Pacific Safety0.16-0.005
Knighthawk0.01-0.005
QHR Technologies Inc1.37+0.05
Cantex0.05-0.01
Anavex Life Sciences0.223-0.0031
Metalex Ventures0.060.00
Russel Metals35.75-1.26
Copper Mountain Mining2.66-0.02
Colorado Resources0.165-0.01
ReliaBrand Inc0.0249+0.0009
Sunrise Resources Ltd0.02-0.005
Mission Ready Services0.29-0.01

 





FEATURED Property
20716263452 Rosedale Place
4 bedrooms 3 baths
$438,800
more details
image2image2image2
Click here to feature your property
Please wait... loading


Is this a fair offer from ICBC?

“Is this a fair offer from ICBC?”…. “How much should I settle for?”… “What is my claim worth?” These are just some of the questions I regularly get as...


Disruptive innovation

Last night I was privileged to be able to speak at the Greater Westside Board of Trade business awards dinner. Photo: ContributedI talked about Innovation and Collaboration which are two very interes...


Executors and their duties

There will be a time when you will need to decide who you should appoint as executor of your Will. As well, there may be a time when you will be asked by someone to act as the executor of his or her W...

_








Member of BC Press Council


23262