Thursday, January 29th2.1°C
24779
24890

TSX and the fiscal cliff

The Toronto stock market was lower Tuesday amid relief that there was a clear-cut winner from Tuesday's U.S. presidential election, with Barrack Obama winning a solid majority of electoral college votes over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

But that sentiment was tempered by the realization that there will likely be some tough slogging ahead as Democrats and Republicans try to extricate the government from automatically imposing tax hikes and steep spending cuts at the end of the year. Investors worry this so-called fiscal cliff scenario would send the U.S. back into recession.

The S&P/TSX composite index fell 82.91 points to 12,278.29 as Canadian investors also absorbed earnings reports from the resource and industrial sectors, with several heavyweights missing estimates.

The TSX Venture Exchange was 4.34 points lower to 1,298.8.

The Canadian dollar was down 0.16 of a cent to 100.67 cents US as commodities backtracked and traders took in another reminder of the fragile state of Europe's economy while looking ahead to a crucial vote in the Greek parliament later in the day.

New York markets were deep in the red as the Dow Jones industrials tumbled 174.56 points to 13,071.12, the Nasdaq composite index dropped 37.94 points to 2,973.99 while the S&P 500 index fell 19.21 points to 1,409.18.

There had been concern that America would have to endure a re-run of the protracted election of 2000.

But its arms of government remain divided, with the Democrats holding onto their majority in the Senate and the Republicans in control of the House of Representatives. That could still lead to a logjam in policymaking, not least over the state of the country's public finances.

"In other words, it's like nothing ever happened," observed Andrew Pyle, investment adviser at ScotiaMcLeod in Peterborough, Ont.

Greece was also back in focus ahead of a crucial vote in its parliament later in the day that could determine whether the country stays in the eurozone. If lawmakers don't back a E$13.5 billion package of spending cuts and tax increases, the country faces the prospect of losing access to its bailout lifeline and potentially defaulting on its mountain of debt and leaving the monetary union.

The Canadian Press


Read more Business News

24153


Recent Trending




Today's Market
S&P TSX14598.64-4.24
S&P CDNX666.37-0.93
DJIA17388.30+196.93
Nasdaq4610.886-27.108
S&P 5001996.64-5.52
CDN Dollar0.7926-0.0054
Gold1286.60-5.10
Oil46.60+0.24
Lumber318.40+2.90
Natural Gas2.87-0.111

 
Okanagan Companies
Pacific Safety0.120.00
Knighthawk0.010.00
QHR Technologies Inc1.45-0.02
Cantex0.04+0.005
Anavex Life Sciences0.185+0.003
Metalex Ventures0.0350.00
Russel Metals23.61-0.09
Copper Mountain Mining0.99-0.01
Colorado Resources0.1450.00
ReliaBrand Inc0.01+0.0031
Sunrise Resources Ltd0.030.00
Mission Ready Services0.210.00

 



24497

FEATURED Property
2091601#117 3825 Glen Canyon Drive
3 bedrooms 3 baths
$379,900
more details
image2
Click here to feature your property
Please wait... loading


Leaving a job: changing careers

Many people, who find themselves out of work and with time on their hands, and money in their pockets due to lay-off, start thinking about a career change. If you weren’t happy with the directio...


Service fit makes happy employees

Finding the right employees for the front lines of your company is key to developing a great service attitude within your company. It is just as important as hiring the right accountant, manager, sale...


How to price: workbook approach

In 2008 Self Counsel Press published my book - Pricing Strategies for Small Business. The book is now available in Europe, India, Russia and the United States. The purpose of the book was to make avai...

_








Member of BC Press Council


24975