146290
146817

Canada  

Choosing not to be a victim

Danielle Kane struggled with depression in her 20s and even contemplated suicide.

But then she fell in love, enrolled in nursing school and felt she was finally on her way — until a summer night last year when a disturbed man went on a shooting spree in Toronto's Greektown and a bullet tore through her body.

"Not now," she thought as she lay on the ground in a pool of blood. "My life is not over."

Kane, 32, was one of 13 people wounded in the July 22, 2018 rampage that left two dead — Reese Fallon, 18, and Julianna Kozis, 10 — and shocked the city.

That night Kane and her partner, Jerry Pinksen, were celebrating a friend's birthday on a restaurant patio on Danforth Avenue when they heard what sounded like fireworks. A waitress urged everyone to go inside because there was a shooter on the loose. Kane was incredulous, but she took her glass of wine and followed Pinksen inside.

"We were safe," she said in a recent interview.

Another patron said there was a victim outside, so Pinksen, an emergency department nurse, rushed out to help. Kane pulled on his arm, briefly worried about his safety, then decided to join him.

"We work in ER together and when there is an emergency, it's all hands on deck," she said.

Kane took two steps outside before she saw a dark figure standing on the street, just metres from the pair.

"I do remember thinking how odd it was he was just standing there," Kane said.

Then she saw the gunman, 29-year-old Faisal Hussain, open fire. She turned slightly and the bullet grazed her left forearm, burning it, before entering her body. It ripped through her abdomen, missed her aorta by a few centimetres and her spinal cord by a millimetre then ricocheted off her spine and exited her body through her right shoulder.

She collapsed and broke her ribs in the fall. She couldn't feel her legs, and she had trouble breathing — her diaphragm and one lung collapsed, the other lung started to fill with blood.

Pinksen heard her scream and rushed back, carrying her inside the restaurant.

He remembered the shock and anger he felt at that moment.

"Then it clicked, she doesn't need this, she needs Jerry the nurse now," he said. He helped stabilize her and they waited until paramedics arrived.

Kane spent the next 11 days in a medically induced coma.

"That was the hardest, her in a coma, on a breathing machine, looking at the screen hoping things get better," said Pinksen, 35.

Doctors performed four surgeries on Kane.

The first was to fuse her spine after the bullet shattered her T-11 vertebrae. The doctors told her the bullet didn't sever her spinal cord, but passed so close that the energy from the bullet transferred to the spinal cord, causing massive cell death and leaving her paralyzed from the waist down.

She had three surgeries to repair her abdomen. When surgeons went in to get a look inside, they found food — ceviche and lamb pasta from dinner — all over her chest wall.

"That would have been a huge source of infection," Pinksen said. "Catching it early saved her life, too."

The last year has been a journey for the pair.

She spent two months at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute learning to live as a paraplegic.

"Everything has changed for me," Kane said.

Pain is her biggest problem now.

"The pain is more disabling than a lack of ability to walk," Kane said. Her lower back hurts and she has a constant "tingly, burning sensation" in her legs.

"From a caregiver and a partner, sometimes it's difficult playing those different roles and seeing someone you care about struggle with pain," Pinksen said. "It's such a preoccupying force in our lives."



More Canada News

Canada
148343
Parliament Hill
Parliament Hill Webcam
145991
Recent Trending
Soft 103.9
147984
Castanet Proud Member of RTNDA Canada
144978



144401
146750