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Canada  

Correctional system failing

Canada's parole officers say the country's corrections system is at a breaking point due to workloads that are "insurmountable" — a situation they say poses real risks to public safety.

A recent survey of parole officers by the Union of Safety and Justice Employees suggested more than two-thirds of parole workers are worried they're not able to properly protect the public because they do not have time to adequately assess, supervise and prepare offenders for release.

The union, which represents the officers, says this means many offenders are left to fall through the cracks — offenders who, in some cases, may re-offend and harm the public or themselves.

"What we're saying is that we are at a critical point here. We have parole officers throughout our survey who are genuinely concerned about public safety," said David Neufeld, a national vice-president of the union.

"Almost 70 per cent of our members who responded to the survey are saying that they're worried that they're not able to sufficiently protect the public because of their current workloads. Things can get missed. Information can get missed."

The survey results were included in a report issued this week by the Union of Safety and Justice Employees, offering a detailed breakdown of the concerns being raised by the 1,600 parole officers in Canada's corrections system.

About half of Canada's federal parole officers work inside penitentiaries and correctional institutions. The rest work with inmates in the community after they are released. They are responsible for developing correctional plans for each inmate, which is how decisions are made about what levels of security inmates need and what kinds of rehabilitation programs will help them.

Decisions made by parole officers determine when and how inmates are released, as well, and into what transitional facilities.

Last fall, a federal auditor general's report found that the Correctional Service of Canada didn't have enough spots in halfway houses for prisoners who were ready to begin reintegrating. The report said parole officers often didn't get key information about inmates' health as they prepared release plans, and officers dealing with parolees often couldn't meet offenders as often as they should have.



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