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Billy and Clydesdale

A dwarf billy goat gave new meaning to the word "scapegoat" when he busted out a Clydesdale that went on the lam in California for several days.

Owner Tamara Schmitz tells the Santa Cruz Sentinel newspaper that the nearly 1-ton horse named Budweiser, who goes by "Buddy," was safely back in his pen Sunday in the Santa Cruz Mountains on the Central Coast.

The goat named Lancelot knows how to butt open the stable gate, and did just that Wednesday.

Buddy eluded volunteers from around the Santa Cruz area for five days, ranging across about 3 miles. The owners even trotted out Lancelot to try to lure back Buddy, but he didn't fall for it.

A pair of searchers on horseback finally found him Sunday hiding amid manzanita shrubs.



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Zorro arrested at airport

A false report of gunshots that sent panicked travellers fleeing from Los Angeles International Airport came right after officers with weapons drawn detained a masked man dressed in black and possibly carrying a sword, officials said.

The sword was plastic, but soon after, hundreds of passengers raced onto streets or the tarmac, causing major flight delays that the airport was still recovering from Monday. Video shows at least six officers confronting the man, who was dressed as the fictional crime fighter Zorro, outside Terminal 7 around 8:40 p.m. Sunday.

False reports of an active shooter quickly spread, and passengers in five terminals evacuated or pushed through security checkpoints, airport police said.

Officers with rifles stormed the airport but uncovered no evidence of a gunman or shots fired.

It's similar to a false alarm that led to a panicked evacuation two weeks ago at Kennedy Airport in New York, when a boisterous celebration of the Olympics may have been misinterpreted as gunfire, authorities say.

The Los Angeles scare created a mess, with three terminals shut down, roads closed and flights held in the air and on the ground, but no reported injuries. About 280 flights were delayed, while at least 27 flights were diverted to other airports and two were cancelled, airport spokeswoman Nancy Castles said.

Vehicle traffic was flowing again on the upper departure level during morning rush hour, but cars backed up on the lower arrival area, Castles said.

All terminals and roads into the airport reopened by 11 p.m. Sunday, about two hours after the initial reports, officials said. Besides traffic, travellers faced a massive backup in security lines because those who fled had to be rescreened through security.

"We were on the jetway, and someone starts pushing behind us," Jon Landis, a sales representative from Boston who was boarding a flight home, told The Associated Press. "One man was frantic, saying there was a shooter."

Police officers, including one with a shotgun, eventually led passengers out of the terminal, through a security gate and into a parking lot, where several hundred people waited. Ninety minutes after the scare, Landis said he was still waiting for word on his flight.

Scott McDonald said he was getting off a plane in the middle of the chaos and the crew told him to get back on. Looking out the window, he said he could see many evacuees gathered on the tarmac, a strange sight even for someone who travels constantly.

"I've never seen passengers, just normal people, on the tarmac anywhere in the United States," McDonald told Los Angeles news station KCAL-TV.

Douglas Lee, who was travelling home to Albuquerque, New Mexico, with his wife and son, said the greatest danger was being trampled.

"You can imagine hundreds of adults trying to go through an exit door," he said.

At one point, he picked up his young son and left their luggage. Abandoned bags littered sidewalks as people fled.

Corey Rosenbusch was relaxing inside a terminal club during a layover between his home in Washington, D.C., and Sydney when the lights went off and the staff told everyone to shelter in place.

"People immediately started looking at social media, where they saw reports that there was an active shooter," Rosenbusch told the AP.

He said several officers, including some with assault rifles, led the group out of the area.

The false alarm comes as police investigate whether a raucous celebration Aug. 14 at JFK airport led to noises people believed were shots, with the ensuing chain reaction turning into a panic as crowds ran to evacuate.



Leaving sexting Weiner

Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin says she is separating from husband Anthony Weiner after another sexting revelation involving the former congressman from New York.

Abedin says in a statement released by Clinton's presidential campaign: "After long and painful consideration and work on my marriage, I have made the decision to separate from my husband.

She adds: "Anthony and I remain devoted to doing what is best for our son, who is the light of our life. During this difficult time, I ask for respect for our privacy."

The New York Post published photos late Sunday that the newspaper said Weiner had sent last year to a woman it identified only as a "40-something divorcee."

The Democrat quit Congress in 2011 following revelations that he was sending women sexually explicit messages.





One ridiculously big bike

Using giant tires from an industrial fertilizer spreader and scrap steel, a German man has built a bicycle weighing 940 kilograms (2,072 pounds) that he plans to pedal into the record books as the world's heaviest rideable bike.

Frank Dose's bike already outweighs the current Guinness World Record holder's 860-kilogram (1,900-pound) contraption.

But the dpa news agency reported Monday that Dose plans to add weight to boost his creation to 1,200 kilograms (2,646 pounds) before attempting the 200-meter (656-foot) ride Saturday.

"I want (the weight) to be four digits," the 49-year-old from Schleswig-Holstein told dpa.

Dose has been building his bike since March. It sports tires that are 1.53 metres (5 feet) in diameter. It's reportedly proved surprisingly easy to ride.

"It's a sensational bike," says his wife, Astrid.



Lightning kills 300 reindeer

More than 300 wild reindeer have been killed by lightning in central Norway.

The Norwegian Environment Agency has released eerie images showing a jumble of reindeer carcasses scattered across a small area on the Hardangervidda mountain plateau. The agency says 323 animals were killed, including 70 calves, in the lightning storm Friday.

Agency spokesman Kjartan Knutsen told The Associated Press it's not uncommon for reindeer or other wildlife to be killed by lightning strikes but this was an unusually deadly event.

"We have not heard about such numbers before," he said Monday.

He said reindeer tend to stay very close to each other in bad weather, which could explain how so many were killed at once.

"I don't know if there were several lightning strikes," he said. "But it happened in one moment."

Knutsen said the agency is now discussing what to do with the dead animals. Normally, they are just left where they fall to let nature take its course, he said.

Thousands of reindeer migrate across the barren Hardangervidda plateau as the seasons change.



Huge cruise ship coke bust

Three Canadian cruise ship passengers were charged with drug smuggling Monday after police in Australia allegedly found 95 kilograms of cocaine in their cabin luggage.

The haul valued at 31 million Australian dollars (US$23 million) was the largest seizure in Australia of narcotics carried by passengers of a cruise ship or airliner, Australian Border Force commander Tim Fitzgerald said.

Andre Tamine, 63, Isabelle Lagace, 28, and Melina Roberce, 22, were arrested Sunday after the MS Sea Princess, operated by California-based Princess Cruises, berthed in Sydney.

The three did not enter pleas when they were charged in the Sydney Central Local Court with importing a commercial quantity of cocaine.

They face potential life sentences if convicted.

The trio will remain in custody until their next court appearance on Oct. 26.

The three Canadians had boarded the ship at the British port city of Southampton.

Police are investigating whether they boarded with the drugs or sourced them from one of several South American ports the ship visited on its way to Australia.

On Sunday, Australian Border Force officers boarded the ship when it berthed in Sydney Harbour and, with the help of detector dogs, searched a number of passenger cabins.

Fitzgerald alleged 35 kilograms of cocaine were found in suitcases in a cabin the women shared and 60 kilograms of the drug were found in the man's luggage in a separate cabin.

He thanked the U.S. Department of Homelands Security and the Canada Border Services Agency for helping identify the three as "high-risk passengers" among the 1,800 on board.

Clive Murray, assistant commissioner of strategic border command with the Australian Border Force, said the incident was an example of international co-operation in the fight against international drug syndicates.

"These syndicates should be on notice that the Australian Border Force is aware of all of the different ways they attempt to smuggle drugs into our country and we are working with a range of international agencies to stop them," he said.

The Australian Federal Police said the investigation is ongoing and further arrests have not been ruled out.



Shooter at LAX false alarm

Reports of a gunman opening fire that turned out to be false caused panicked evacuations at Los Angeles International Airport on Sunday night, while flights to and from the airport were delayed.

A search through terminals brought no evidence of a gunman or shots fired, Los Angeles police spokesman Andy Neiman said. The reports were spurred by loud noises only, and police were still investigating to find the source of them, Neiman said.

Airport officials said that a person wearing a Zorro costume was detained during the incident, but it wasn't yet clear whether the person had any connection to the evacuation.

The incident still left a mess in its wake.

Terminals were slowly starting to reopen but the passengers who fled will have to be rescreened through security, airport police said.

Roads into the airport were only slowly starting to be reopened, and flights were only slowly resuming again, with massive backup expected for both, officials said.

When the incident began, scores of people could be seen on social media and on TV news running from the terminal out on to the sidewalks and streets as police with rifles out stormed terminals. Many other evacuees were standing on the airport tarmac, and abandoned bags littered some sidewalks.

"We were on the jetway and someone starts pushing behind us," Jon Landis, a sales representative from Boston who was boarding a flight home, told The Associated Press. "One man was frantic saying there was a shooter."

Police officers, including one with a shotgun, eventually led passengers out of the terminal, through a security gate, and into a parking lot — where several hundred passengers waited for the terminal to reopen. Ninety minutes after the scare, Landis said he was still waiting for word on his flight.

Passenger Scott McDonald said he was getting off a plane in the middle of the incident and was told by the crew to get back on. He said looking out the window he could see many evacuees gathered out on the tarmac, a strange sight even for someone who travels almost constantly.

"I've never seen passengers, just normal people, on the tarmac anywhere in the United States," McDonald told KCAL-TV.

Leyna Nguyen, an anchor for KCAL whose flight happened to arrive just before the panic began, said even false reports "create such a chaotic scene, it's really scary."

"I saw people running faster than I've ever seen people run just to get out of the way," Nguyen said.

It came just days after another false alarm led to a panicked evacuation of Kennedy Airport in New York.

In that incident, police were investigating whether an overly boisterous celebration of the Olympics on Aug. 14 led to noises that were misinterpreted as gunfire, with the ensuing chain reaction turning into a panic as crowds ran to evacuate.

The Los Angeles airport had an actual shooting in November 2013, when a man opened fire in the terminal, killing a security agent and wounding three other people.



Hundreds at nuns' wake

More than 300 people came to a small church Sunday evening to say farewell to two nuns killed in their Mississippi home, even though more than half had to watch the service called vigil for the deceased on a monitor outside.

A funeral Mass for Sisters Margaret Held and Paula Merrill, both 68, will be celebrated Monday at the cathedral in Jackson, even as authorities continue to investigate the harrowing crime.

About 145 people filled St. Thomas Church in Lexington, where the nuns led Bible study. A monitor was placed outside where another 160 people sat on folding chairs and others stood to watch the service led by Bishop Joseph Kopacz of the Jackson Diocese.

The church's priest, the Rev. Gregory Plata, spoke about how far-reaching the nuns' work was, and how much they'll be missed.

They worked in a clinic for the poor in Lexington, about 10 miles from their home in Durant.

The final hymn, described as Sister Margaret Held's favourite, was "How Can I Keep from Singing?"

Afterward, , nuns from the dead women's orders, people from other faiths, and members of the community, black and white, embraced the women's families.

The killing shocked people in the small communities where the women committed their lives to helping the poor.

Rodney Earl Sanders, 46, of Kosciusko, Mississippi, has been arrested and charged in the stabbings. The county sheriff said Sanders confessed to the killings although many people are struggling to comprehend why anyone would want to take the two women's lives.

Their bodies were found in their Durant, Mississippi, home after they failed to show up for work Thursday at the health clinic.

Willie March, the sheriff of Holmes County where the killings occurred, said Saturday that police work and tips from the community led police to Sanders. Authorities have said Sanders was developed as a person of interest early in the investigation.

March said he had been briefed by Durant police and Mississippi Bureau of Investigation officials who took part in Sanders' interrogation and was told that Sanders confessed to the killings and gave no reason for the crimes. The sheriff said the investigation is ongoing.

Durant police could not be reached for comment Saturday or Sunday. Warren Strain, a spokesman for the Department of Public Safety which includes the Mississippi Bureau of Investigation, said the organization would neither confirm nor deny that Sanders confessed.

Sanders had a criminal record.

He was convicted last year of a felony DUI, said Grace Simmons Fisher, a spokeswoman for the Mississippi Department of Corrections.

He was later released from prison and is currently on probation.

Sanders was also convicted of armed robbery in Holmes County, sentenced in 1986 and served six years, Fisher said.

People who knew the nuns, known for their generosity and commitment to improving health care for the poor, have been grappling with why anyone would want to kill them.

Dr. Elias Abboud, the physician who oversees the clinic in Lexington where the nuns worked, said Saturday that Sanders was not a patient there.

Plata said he does not think people at the church knew Sanders.

Authorities said Sanders was being held in an undisclosed detention centre pending a court appearance. They have not given any details on why they think Sanders killed the women or whether he knew them but they do say they believe he acted alone.

Strain said he does not know if Sanders has an attorney.

Merrill's nephew, David Merrill, speaking by telephone from Stoneham, Massachusetts, said Saturday the family was "thankful" Sanders is off the streets.

But the family still has to deal with the loss.

Merrill said he agrees with the idea of forgiveness and that is something his aunt would want for whoever killed her but he's not sure if he's capable of completely forgiving.

Merrill said he would not support the death penalty if Sanders were to be convicted but that decision will ultimately be made by the people in Mississippi. The capital murder charge leaves open the possibility Sanders would face the death penalty but that determination would be made by prosecutors later.

The order Held belonged to — School Sisters of St. Francis — thanked law enforcement officers working on the case and thanked people who offered prayers and support in the wake of the sisters' deaths.

In the poverty-stricken Mississippi county where the two nuns were slain, many people were still mourning their loss.

Jonell Payton, a Durant alderwoman, lives across the street and a few doors down from Held and Merrill's house. She said the nuns were "the most precious two people" and were known for helping provide medicine for those who couldn't afford it.

Both women worked at the clinic, where they gave flu shots, dispensed insulin and provided other medical care for children and adults who couldn't afford it.

The clinic and the nuns' home in Durant are in Holmes County, population 18,000. With 44 per cent of its residents living in poverty, Holmes is the seventh-poorest county in America, according to the Census Bureau.

The nuns' death leaves a gaping hole in what was already a strapped health care system.

The clinic provided about 25 per cent of all medical care in the county, Abboud said.



2 dead, dozens injured

A bus full of construction workers hit a firetruck on an elevated highway Sunday, killing two people and injuring 36, several of them seriously, Louisiana State Police said.

The ladder truck from St. John the Baptist Parish, west of New Orleans, had parked across the right lane of Interstate 10 to block traffic while police investigated an earlier wreck involving a pickup truck that had skidded on the wet road, crashing into both guardrails about 6:40 a.m., Trooper Melissa Matey said.

The 2002 Eldorado National party bus hit the fire truck and then rear-ended a 2012 Toyota Camry, pushing it into a flatbed trailer being towed by a 2016 Chevrolet Silverado, Matey said. She said the bus then veered behind the fire truck and into the first pickup truck, a 2005 Nissan Titan. It also knocked three firefighters, who were standing near the guard rail, into the water 30 to 40 feet below.

Matey said the wreck killed Jermaine Starr, 21, of Moss Point, Mississippi, a back-seat passenger in the Camry, and St. John the Baptist Parish district Fire Chief Spencer Chauvin. The injured included the other two firefighters, the bus driver, 24 bus passengers and a total of nine people in the car and pickups.

Firefighter Nicholas Saale, 32, of Ponchatoula, and Camry passenger Vontravous Kelly of Moss Point, Mississippi, are in critical condition, she said. The Camry's other two occupants, driver Marcus Tate, 35, and David Jones, both of Moss Point, are in serious condition.

Other injuries — including the Titan's two occupants, who suffered minor injuries in the original crash — ranged from minor to moderate, Matey said.

The bus driver, identified as Denis Yasmir Amaya Rodriguez, 37, of Honduras, will be arrested on two counts of negligent homicide and one each of reckless driving and driving without a license, she said.

"Additional criminal charges are forthcoming," she said.

The injured were taken to hospitals in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Hammond and LaPlace, she said.

Matey said the bus was taking flood recovery workers from New Orleans to Baton Rouge.

It belonged to a company with two names: AM Party Bus and Kristina's Transportation LLC, both at the same address in Jefferson, about 30 miles from New Orleans in Jefferson Parish, Matey said.

No listing in Jefferson was available. A call to Kristina's Transportation in Destrehan, 12 miles from Jefferson in St. Charles Parish, was not answered Sunday. A woman who answered the phone at AM Party Bus of New Orleans said she was only authorized to take booking calls.

Matey did not know whether Rodriguez was an employee of that company, or whether the company checked to see whether he had a driver's license.

"He is in this country illegally from Honduras. He has no driver's license. He had minor injuries," she said.

Matey did not know where in Honduras Rodriguez is from.

Department of Homeland Security investigators and state police are checking on the passengers' immigration status, she said.

Matey said speed was a factor in both the crash of the Titan, which bounced from one guard rail to the other about 6:40 a.m., and that of the bus at 7:17 a.m.



Tipsy pilots grounded

Two United Airlines pilots who have been arrested for suspected intoxication before they were to fly 141 passengers from Scotland to the United States will appear in a Scottish court Monday, police said.

The Police Service of Scotland said it arrested both pilots Saturday at Glasgow Airport and both men, aged 45 and 35, would be arraigned at a court in Paisley, a Glasgow suburb, to face charges connected to Britain's transport safety laws.

United Airlines said Saturday's flight from Glasgow to the U.S. city of Newark, New Jersey, was delayed for 10 hours while the airline sought replacement pilots.

"The two pilots have been removed from service and their flying duties," United spokeswoman Erin Benson said. "We are co-operating with the authorities and will conduct our own investigation as well. The safety of our customers and crew is our highest priority."

Saturday's arrests come barely a month after two Canadian pilots of an Air Transat plane were arrested at Glasgow Airport and charged with trying to fly while intoxicated.



Taking it off for a cause

Women around the country are taking off their tops on GoTopless Day, a day that promotes gender equality and women's rights to bare their breasts in public.

GoTopless Day is celebrated annually on the Sunday closest to Women's Equality Day, marking the day American women earned the right to vote.

A few dozen women, and some men, went topless Sunday afternoon as they walked down Broadway in New York City. The march was led by some women carrying a banner, followed by others in a convertible, with the top down, of course. Coming up at the end was a pair of giant inflatable breasts. Onlookers gawked and took photos as the parade participants went by.

The event in New York City was one of several planned for cities across the globe. Gatherings were planned in New Hampshire, Denver, Los Angeles and more.

Nadine Gray, president of GoTopless, said she hopes the events will take away the shock and awe around seeing female breasts.

"In New York City, we are really celebrating our right to be freely topless without getting a ticket or going to jail for it. In other places, it will be more like a protest because the discrimination is still happening," she said. "This push for women to go topless in the 21st century is as strong as women wanting to vote in the 20th century. It may be sensual, but it's not illegal to be sensual. This is not Saudi Arabia."

It's been legal to be bare-breasted in New York since 1992. The legality of women going topless varies by state.

Kia Sinclair is an event organizer for GoTopless Day at Hampton Beach in New Hampshire.

"It's in hopes to show people that it can be normal, that it's really not a big deal and it's not about getting attention or protesting," she said.

Sinclair was also part of a group of women who last year helped beat back an effort to criminalize toplessness in the state.



Trump to talk immigration

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump announced Sunday he'll be making a speech on illegal immigration on Wednesday in Arizona, after a week of speculation that he might be softening his hard-line promise to deport 11 million people living in the United States illegally.

The speech was initially set for last Thursday in Phoenix, but was pushed back as Trump and his team wrestled over the details of what he would propose. There has been debate within his campaign about immigrants who haven't committed crimes beyond their immigration offences.

The candidate's shifting stance hasn't made it easy for top supporters and advisers, from his running mate on down, to defend him or explain some campaign positions. Across the Sunday news shows, a parade of Trump stand-ins, led by vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence, couldn't say whether Trump was sticking with or changing a central promise to use a "deportation force" to expel immigrants here illegally. And they didn't bother defending his initial response Saturday to the killing of a mother as she walked her baby on a Chicago street.

Questioned on whether leaving key details on immigration policy unclear so late in the election is a problem, Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus demurred: "I just don't speak for Donald Trump."

It was a striking look at Trump's leadership of a team he had said would help drive him to victory in the Nov. 8 election.

Surrogates speak for and back up their presidential nominee. But Team Trump's struggled to do so even as they stayed tightly together on the details they know: Trump will issue more details on the immigration plan soon, the policy will be humane, and despite his clear wavering, he's been "consistent" on the issue. Any discussion of inconsistencies or potentially unpresidential tweeting, Pence and others suggested, reflected media focus on the wrong issue.

Asked whether the "deportation force" proposal Trump laid out in November is still in place, Pence replied: "Well, what you heard him describe there, in his usual plainspoken, American way, was a mechanism, not a policy."

Added Trump's campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway: "The softening is more approach than policy," adding that on immigration, Trump "wants to find a fair and humane way."

The Indiana governor, Conway and other surrogates said the main tenets of Trump's immigration plan still will include building a wall along the southern U.S. border and making Mexico pay for it, no path to status adjustment or citizenship for people here illegally and stronger border enforcement. Pence also did not answer whether the campaign believes, as Trump has said, that children born to people who are in the U.S. illegally are not U.S. citizens. That, he said, "is a subject for the future."

Native-born children of immigrants, even those living illegally in the U.S., have been automatically considered American citizens since the adoption of the 14th Amendment in 1868.

Trump has focused lately on deporting people who are in the U.S. illegally and who have committed crimes. But who Trump considers a criminal remained unclear Sunday.

Trump in recent days has suggested he might be "softening" on the deportation force and that he might be open to allowing at least some immigrants in the country illegally to stay, as long as they pay taxes.

But by Thursday, he was ruling out any kind of legal status — "unless they leave the country and come back," he told CNN.

Recent polls indicate Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is ahead in some of the most competitive and pivotal states. The first presidential debate is set for Sept. 26.

His surrogates on Sunday refused to comment on Trump's reaction to the fatal shooting of NBA star Dwyane Wade's cousin Friday, as she pushed her baby in a stroller in Chicago.

Trump's first tweet about the shooting ended this way: "Just what I have been saying. African-Americans will VOTE TRUMP!"

A few hours later, he followed up with a tweet offering condolences to Wade and his family.

Asked whether the initial tweet was presidential or appropriate, GOP officials and campaign advisers instead talked about reducing crime or said they were pleased Trump followed up with a tweet of condolence and empathy.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said the media "focus on process ... instead of the message." He said the killing of someone pushing a stroller "is unacceptable in an American city" and that "the level of violence in Chicago is unacceptable."

Pence appeared on CNN's "State of the Union," Priebus was on NBC's "Meet the Press," Christie was interviewed on ABC's "This Week" and Conway was on Fox and CBS' "Face the Nation."



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