42177
41698

World  

Kennedys party too loud

Two members of the Kennedy family have been arrested in Massachusetts following complaints about a loud party and fireworks.

Barnstable police say officers responded to a home near the family compound in Hyannis Port early Sunday morning on noise complaints.

Police say 52-year-old Matthew "Max" Kennedy and his daughter, 22-year-old Caroline Kennedy, were taken into custody and charged with disorderly conduct and violating the town's noise law. They both were later released on their own recognizance.

Matthew Kennedy pleaded not guilty at his arraignment on Monday in Barnstable District Court. Caroline Kennedy will be arraigned at a later date. It was not immediately clear if she had an attorney who could comment on the charges.

Matthew Kennedy is an author and the ninth child of Robert and Ethel Kennedy.



44273


Attack suspects in court

Four alleged members of a terror cell accused of killing 15 people in attacks in Barcelona and a nearby resort appeared in court Tuesday, a day after the last missing member of the cell was gunned down by police.

The four men were arrested last week for their alleged involvement in planning or carrying out vehicle attacks on pedestrians in Barcelona on Thursday and the northeastern town of Cambrils early Friday.

Mohamed Houli Chemlal, a 21 year-old arrested after he survived an explosion at a house in eastern Spain last week, was the first to testify before National Court Judge Fernando Andreu in Madrid. Andreu will decide whether the four should be jailed or released.

Chemlal's testimony is considered key to understanding the motivations of the 12-man cell that killed 15 people and wounded over 120 in the two vehicle attacks. He is the lone survivor of a blast Wednesday that destroyed a house in Alcanar, south of Barcelona, where police believe the cell was preparing explosives for an even bigger attack on the city. Over 100 tanks of butane gas and materials to make TATP explosive were found at the house, police say.

A spokeswoman for prosecutors said the four would be interrogated throughout the day in the presence of lawyers provided for them by the court. Speaking anonymously in line with court rules, she said the testimony would be in Spanish without interpreters.

Suspect Driss Oukabir was arrested Thursday in the northeastern town of Ripoll, as were two others identified by Spanish media as Mohammed Aalla and Salh el Karib. Police have not yet confirmed the last two names.

The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for both attacks.

The lone fugitive from the cell — 22-year-old Younes Abouyaaqoub — was shot to death Monday after he flashed what turned out to be a fake suicide belt at two police who confronted him in a vineyard not far from the city he terrorized.



Train slams into terminal

A commuter train crashed into a parked train at a suburban Philadelphia terminal early Tuesday morning, injuring dozens of passengers and the train's operator.

None of the 42 people hurt in the crash suffered life-threatening injuries, said Heather Redfern, a spokeswoman for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority. "Some were considered walking wounded," she said.

An inbound Norristown High Speed train crashed into an unoccupied train at the 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby around 12:15 a.m. Tuesday. Redfern said hours later that the train operator had been treated at a hospital and released.

National Transportation Safety Board officials were at the scene and planned a briefing later in the day.

A passenger, Raymond Woodard, told WPVI-TV, that he was riding home from work when the train crashed.

"I heard the train going real fast ... like, super-fast," Woodard said. "And I looked up, and I saw that we're at 69th Street and said, 'Why are we going so fast?' And then we just hit the train. Boom! I fell out of my chair, glass from the window shattered, I hit my head. Everybody was on the floor."

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority officials are investigating the cause.

Redfern said Norristown trains resumed normal operation but no express trains were running.



44894


Pulled from quake rubble

Firefighters on the Italian resort island of Ischia first freed a seven-month-old baby and then his two older brothers from the rubble Tuesday, working through the night and often by hand to rescue the children after a 4.0-magnitude quake toppled homes and other buildings on the island.

At least two people were killed in the quake that struck just before 9 p.m. Monday, while another 39 were injured and some 2,600 were left homeless. The victims were an elderly woman who was in a church that crumbled in the quake, and a second person who was located in the rubble but had not yet been extracted.

Cheers went up with each rescue, which firefighters confirmed with exclamation mark-punctuated tweets. The first was baby Pasquale, who was shown on a video wearing a white onesie and appearing alert as he was passed to safety, around 4 a.m.

It took another seven hours to free the middle brother, eight-year-old Matthias, who was pictured in his underwear and covered with cement dust before being quickly loaded onto a stretcher and into an ambulance, and two more hours to free the eldest boy, 11-year-old Ciro, who was credited with helping save Matthias.

The children's parents were waiting for Ciro at the hospital's emergency room, his mother sitting in a wheelchair next to his father, Alessandro, whose hands were bandaged reportedly from injuries suffered while trying to dig through the rubble to reach his children.

"It was a terrible night. I don't have words to explain it," the father told RAI state television while rescuers were working to free the older two boys. "The entire second floor of the house collapsed, and the firefighters pulled me out. They were great."



Indonesia fire emergency

The number of dry season fires burning across Indonesia has jumped to more than 500 and a sixth province has declared a state of emergency, the disaster mitigation agency said Tuesday.

Spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said satellite images show 538 fires across 23 provinces, up from about 160 early in the month.

Plantation companies and villagers often set the fires deliberately to clear land for planting. They spread easily because a widespread practice in Indonesia of draining swampy peatlands for palm oil and pulp wood plantations has made swathes of land highly combustible.

Nugroho said Central Kalimantan was the latest province to declare a state of emergency. Last month five provinces — Riau, Jambi, South Sumatra, West Kalimantan, and South Kalimantan — declared emergencies in anticipation of a worsening of the fires and to enable measures to mitigate the choking smoke that peatlands generate when burned.

He said the agency has deployed 21 helicopters to help extinguish fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan as well as a Casa 212 aircraft to induce rain in Sumatra.

More than one-third of the fires are in West Kalimantan on the Indonesian part of Borneo and one quarter are in the easternmost Indonesian region of Papua. Typically the fires have affected Sumatra and Kalimantan the most, but plantation companies have found new frontiers in Papua's wilderness, exposing it to greater fire risk.



Bodies found on navy ship

The commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet said some remains of Navy sailors were found in a compartment of the USS John McCain on Tuesday, a day after the warship's collision with an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters left 10 sailors missing.

Adm. Scott Swift also said at a news conference in Singapore that Malaysian officials had found one body, which had yet to be identified.

The focus of the search for the missing sailors shifted Tuesday to the damaged destroyer's flooded compartments. The collision on Monday tore a gaping hole in the McCain's left rear hull and flooded adjacent compartments including crew berths and machinery and communication rooms. Five sailors were injured.

"The divers were able to locate some remains in those sealed compartments during their search today," Swift said, adding that it was "premature to say how many and what the status of recovery of those bodies is."

He said the body found by the Malaysians would have to be identified to "determine whether it's one of the missing sailors or not."

"We will continue the search and rescue operations until the probability of discovering sailors is exhausted," Swift said.

It was the second major collision in two months involving the Pacific-based 7th Fleet, and the Navy has ordered a broad investigation into its performance and readiness. Seven sailors died in June when the USS Fitzgerald and a container ship collided in waters off Japan. There were two lesser-known incidents in the first half of the year. In January, the USS Antietam guided missile cruiser ran aground near Yokosuka base, the home port of the 7th Fleet, and in May another cruiser, the USS Lake Champlain from the Navy's 3rd Fleet, had a minor collision with a South Korean fishing boat.



Iran: 5 days to nuke-ready

Iran's atomic chief warned Tuesday the Islamic Republic needs only five days to ramp up its uranium enrichment to 20 per cent, a level at which the material could be used for a nuclear weapon.

The comments by Ali Akbar Salehi to Iranian state television come as U.S. President Donald Trump repeatedly has threatened to renegotiate or walk away from the 2015 nuclear deal.

Salehi's warning, along with recent comments by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, show Iran is willing to push back against Trump while still acknowledging they want to keep the deal, which lifted crippling economic sanctions on the country.

"If there is a plan for a reaction and a challenge, we will definitely surprise them," said Salehi, who also serves as one of Rouhani's vice-presidents. "If we make the determination, we are able to resume 20 per cent-enrichment in at most five days."

He added: "Definitely, we are not interested in such a thing happening. We have not achieved the deal easily to let it go easily. We are committed to the deal and we are loyal to it."

Rouhani's comments were sparked by Trump signing a sanctions bill imposing mandatory penalties on people involved in Iran's ballistic missile program and anyone who does business with them. 



Afghanistan: US to fight on

Reversing his past calls for a speedy exit, President Donald Trump recommitted the United States to the 16-year-old war in Afghanistan Monday night, declaring U.S. troops must "fight to win." He pointedly declined to disclose how many more troops will be dispatched to wage America's longest war.

In a prime-time address to unveil his new Afghanistan strategy, Trump said the U.S. would shift away from a "time-based" approach, instead linking its assistance to results and to co-operation from the beleaguered Afghan government, Pakistan and others. He insisted it would be a "regional" strategy that addressed the roles played by other South Asian nations — especially Pakistan's harbouring of elements of the Taliban.

"America will work with the Afghan government as long as we see determination and progress," Trump said. "However, our commitment is not unlimited, and our support is not a blank check."

Although Trump insisted he would "not talk about numbers of troops" or telegraph military moves in advance, he hinted that he'd embraced the Pentagon's proposal to boost troop numbers by nearly 4,000, augmenting the roughly 8,400 Americans there now.

"We will ask our NATO allies and global partners to support our new strategy, with additional troop and funding increases in line with our own. We are confident they will," Trump said in comments echoed by Defence Secretary Jim Mattis.



Fort Knox opens vault

Inside the famed vaults at Fort Knox, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell held a 27-pound gold bar in his hands Monday as part of the first civilian delegation to see most of the country's bullion reserves in more than 40 years.

McConnell was part of a delegation of Kentucky politicians allowed inside the United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox for the first time since 1974. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin initiated the visit, along with U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie and Gov. Matt Bevin.

The depository holds more than 147 million ounces of gold, which puts its market value at more than $186 billion. While primarily known as a vault for gold, the depository also held the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution during World War II.

Mnuchin said it was the first time Fort Knox opened its vaults to outsiders since a Congressional delegation and some journalists were let in to view the gold for the first time in 1974.

"All I will say is that it is freakishly well secured," said Bevin. "The gold is safe."



60 migrants stuffed in truck

Sixty immigrants have been found in a load of ice-covered broccoli in a refrigerated trailer that was searched at a South Texas border checkpoint, federal officials said Monday.

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection statement said nobody was hurt and the trucker was arrested at the Falfurrias checkpoint.

Agents on Saturday opened the padlocked trailer and found dozens of immigrants amid pallets of broccoli lined with ice. Customs officials say the temperature inside the trailer was 49 degrees (9 degrees Celsius). Some immigrants wore hooded heavy coats.

The immigrants — from Guatemala, Mexico, El Salvador and Hondurans — were detained and being processed for entering the U.S. illegally. The trucker faces immigrant smuggling charges.

Officials didn't immediately say where the produce was headed or provide further details on the investigation.

Last week, Border Patrol agents found 16 immigrants locked inside a semitrailer at a gas station in the South Texas city of Edinburg and 20 immigrants crammed into a locked semitrailer at an Interstate 10 checkpoint southwest of El Paso. All were in good condition.

Last month, 10 people entering the U.S. died after being packed with as many as 90 other people into a sweltering tractor-trailer that was found outside a San Antonio Walmart.



Cosby hires Jackson lawyer

Bill Cosby has hired Michael Jackson's former lawyer to represent him at his November retrial on sexual-assault charges in Pennsylvania.

Cosby's spokesman announced Monday the 80-year-old comedian is bringing in Tom Mesereau to lead a retooled defence team. Lawyers from the first trial in June had said they wanted off the case.

Mesereau won an acquittal in Jackson's 2005 child molestation trial. He also has represented boxer Mike Tyson, rap mogul Marion "Suge" Knight and a Playboy bunny.

Mesereau will be joined by former federal prosecutor Kathleen Bliss and Sam Silver, who represented now-imprisoned former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah in a corruption case.

Cosby's first trial on charges he drugged and molested a woman at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004 ended in a hung jury.



Another navy collision

The U.S. Navy ordered a broad investigation Monday into the performance and readiness of the Pacific-based 7th Fleet after an early morning collision between the USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters left 10 U.S. sailors missing and others injured.

It was the second major collision in the last two months involving the Navy's 7th Fleet. Seven sailors died in June when the USS Fitzgerald and a container ship collided in waters off Japan.

Navy Adm. John Richardson, the chief of naval operations, will call for a pause in operations and seek a deeper look at how the Navy trains and certifies its forces that are operating around Japan, Defence Secretary Jim Mattis said.

"He has put together a broader inquiry to look into these incidents," Mattis said, referring to the two recent collisions and other accidents at sea. Mattis spoke to reporters in Amman, Jordan, where he is travelling.

Vessels and aircraft from the U.S., Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia are searching for the missing sailors. Four other sailors were evacuated by a Singaporean navy helicopter to a hospital in the city-state for treatment of non-life threatening injuries, the Navy said. A fifth was taken to the hospital by ambulance after the destroyer arrived in Singapore under its own power, the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore said.

There was no immediate explanation for the collision. Singapore, at the southernmost tip of the Malay Peninsula, is one of the world's busiest ports and a U.S. ally, with its naval base regularly visited by American warships.

The McCain had been heading to Singapore on a routine port visit after conducting a sensitive freedom-of-navigation operation last week by sailing near one of China's man-made islands in the South China Sea. The collision east of Singapore between the 154-metre destroyer guided missile destroyer and the 183-metre Alnic MC ripped a gaping hole in the destroyer's hull.

The Navy's 7th Fleet said "significant damage" to the McCain's hull resulted in the flooding of adjacent compartments including crew berths, machinery and communications rooms. 

The destroyer was damaged on its port side aft, or left rear, in the 5:24 a.m. collision about 4.5 nautical miles from Malaysia's coast but was able to sail on to Singapore's naval base. 



More World News

World
43744
London Webcam
Webcam provided by webcams.travel
36520
Recent Trending
37399
Castanet Proud Member of RTNDA Canada
44929



39260