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Cop killer on the loose

An intense search continued Saturday for a suspect in the fatal shooting of a rookie police officer.

The shooting happened shortly after 8 p.m. Friday in New Kensington, about 29 kilometres northeast of Pittsburgh. Officer Brian Shaw, 25, was shot after a traffic stop involving an SUV led to him chasing someone on foot, authorities said.

Police later recovered an older model of an unoccupied brown Jeep Grand Cherokee, wanted in connection with the shooting.

Shaw had served as a part-time officer in three other towns before joining the New Kensington police force full time in June. He was taken to a hospital after the shooting but was pronounced dead there a short time later, according to authorities.

Police officers from neighbouring towns continued to scour the area for the suspect early Saturday. SWAT teams and police dogs assisted.

A description of the suspect has not been released. Authorities planned to provide more details at a news conference Saturday.



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Rock legend passes away

The co-founder of one of the world's biggest rock bands has died.

Malcolm Young has passed away at age 64.

Malcolm formed iconic Australian rock band AC/DC with his brother and lead guitarist, Angus Young, in 1974.

A statement on the AC/DC website said the band’s members are feeling a “deep, heartfelt sadness” following news of his death, adding that Malcolm was “the driving force behind the band.”

The band has sold more than 200 million albums.

“It is with deepest sorrow that we inform you of the death of Malcolm Young, beloved husband, father, grandfather and brother. Malcolm had been suffering from Dementia for several years and passed away peacefully with his family by his bedside,” said a statement on the band's Facebook page.

“Renowned for his musical prowess Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many. From the outset, he knew what he wanted to achieve and, along with his younger brother, took to the world stage giving their all at every show. Nothing less would do for their fans.”

- with files from CTV News



Marching against Mugabe

In a euphoric gathering that just days ago would have drawn a police crackdown, crowds marched through Zimbabwe's capital on Saturday to demand the departure of President Robert Mugabe, one of Africa's last remaining liberation leaders, after nearly four decades in power.

Zimbabweans giddy with joy raced through intersections, raising their arms in triumph. Young men shouted, laughed and embraced. Others danced on top of moving buses. One man stripped to his underwear and danced on a car roof.

In the first public outpouring since the military put Mugabe under house arrest earlier in the week, the bulk of Harare's population of about 1.6 million appeared to be in the streets. The army held back thousands who gathered near the State House, home to official functions, while others headed toward Mugabe's lavish mansion.

Some marchers had posters with an image of the military commander who swept in to take control, with the slogan: "Go, go, our general!!!" Marchers handed flags to soldiers, who accepted and waved.

"It's like Christmas," said one marcher, Fred Mubay, who said Zimbabweans have been suffering for a long time.

Another resident, Trust Chuma, sat quietly on a bench and watched. "This is the biggest day in the history of Zimbabwe," he said.

The 93-year-old Mugabe, the world's oldest head of state, is said to be asking for more time amid negotiations with regional leaders that seek his exit with a veneer of dignity.

But he is virtually powerless and deserted by most of his allies, with others arrested, and the ruling party has turned on him, asking for a Central Committee meeting this weekend to recall both him and his wife. Impeachment is also a possibility when Parliament resumes Tuesday.

The dancing crowds in Harare made it clear the country is impatient to move on without Mugabe, who took power 37 years ago amid an air of optimism but has been accused of squandering the once-prosperous country's potential.

Even as concerns remained about who next would be in charge and what freedoms might be available if the military lingers in power — or if Mugabe's recently fired deputy leads a new government — people reveled in the rare chance to speak out.

Zimbabwean newspaper publisher Trevor Ncube tweeted: "Dear world, we are fully aware of the possible risks and pitfalls beyond this tipping point. ... After 37 years of repression, allow us to soak in this moment. Sincerely, #Zimbabwe."

The demonstrators, in the event approved by the military, hoped the big turnout would speed up the official end of Mugabe's rule, which is widely blamed for the collapse of an economy that was once one of Africa's wealthiest.

Veterans of the long liberation war against white minority rule, once close allies of Mugabe, took part in the demonstration, along with opposition activists who long have faced police crackdowns by the Mugabe government.

Zimbabwe's state-run media showed previously unthinkable images of the celebrations. The Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation called the country "free and liberated" and showed footage of one person carrying a sign saying "The people of Zimbabwe want Mugabe to go."

The state-run Zimbabwe Herald newspaper's report "#Mugabe Must Go!" noted some of Mugabe's achievements but said that "however the revolutionary train derailed somewhere along the way."

Outside the State House, a place few previously dared venture, soldiers posed for pictures as marchers streamed by. Thousands of people later gathered at an intersection nearby, with security forces blocked them from moving further.

The military in a new statement urged the thousands upon thousands of people streaming through the capital to be orderly and "vigilant against agent provocateurs" who might wish to discredit the events.

At an intersection, a vendor held up a newspaper with the headline: "Mugabe cornered." The majority of adult Zimbabweans now survive on informal trade after formal industry collapsed.

Harare's Robert Mugabe Street turned into a carnival. Drivers gunned their engines, blasted their horns and circled in a main intersection, enveloping the crowd in exhaust fumes.

One driver got out of his moving car and danced in front of it for a couple of minutes as the empty vehicle coasted slowly down a street lined with cheering crowds.

Some white Zimbabweans joined the crowd at Harare's Freedom Square, also known as Robert Mugabe Square. Some whites and blacks hugged each other.

In Zimbabwe's second-largest city, Bulawayo, former education minister David Coltart said he spoke at a "massive march" organized by churches to urge President Robert Mugabe to resign. He said thousands of people were there.

"I never thought I would see the day as we marched past central police station without being arrested!" he said. "Amazing scenes."

Thousands gathered for speeches at the Zimbabwe Grounds, chosen for the symbolism. The location is where Zimbabweans gathered to cheer Mugabe's return from exile in 1980 after the liberation war from white minority rule.



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Earthquake jolts China

A strong earthquake has shaken China's Tibet region but there's no immediate word on damage or casualties.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the 6.3 magnitude quake hit at a depth of about 6 miles (10 kilometres) about 36 miles (58 kilometres) northeast of Nyingchi.

The official Xinhua News Agency put the magnitude at 6.9 and says it struck at 6:34 a.m. Beijing time.



He tried to steal a train

A Phoenix man was close to turning a locomotive into his own runaway train.

Police say 20-year-old Julio Rodriguez was arrested earlier this month after trying to steal a train from a rail yard just south of downtown Phoenix.

Union Pacific Railroad workers say they were alarmed when they heard the train horn Nov. 8 and went to investigate.

They discovered Rodriguez, who was actually released from jail earlier that day, sitting in the engineer's seat.

Employees removed him and found he had moved levers and pushed buttons.

They say he was one pedal away from actually moving the train.

According to court documents, Rodriguez admitted to trying to steal the train.

He faces charges of theft of means of transportation and burglary.



Mid-air collision in UK

An aircraft and helicopter collided in mid-air Friday northwest of London and a "number of casualties" were reported, authorities said.

Fire and ambulance services rushed to the scene at 12:06 p.m. near Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire. Two ambulance crews, two ambulance officers and a rapid response vehicle were deployed, the South Central Ambulance Service said.

"We're aware of a number of casualties following an incident this afternoon," Thames Valley Police said in a tweet. "There were a number of road closures following the incident, which have now been lifted."

The Air Accidents Investigation Branch said it was sending a team to the site of the accident, which is in dense woodland.

The crash took place near Waddesdon Manor, which is managed by the Rothschild Foundation, a family charitable trust, on behalf of the National Trust. The manor said the crash did not happen at the site and there were no casualties at the manor.

A nearby military base, RAF Halton, also said no military aircraft were involved.



Why not Trump?

"You can do anything," Donald Trump once boasted, speaking of groping and kissing unsuspecting women.
Maybe he could, but not everyone can.

The candidate who openly bragged about grabbing women's private parts — but denied he really did so — was elected president months before the cascading sexual harassment allegations that have been toppling the careers of powerful men in Hollywood, business, the media and politics. He won even though more than a dozen women accused him of sexual misconduct, and roughly half of all voters said they were bothered by his treatment of women, according to exit polls.

Now, as one prominent figure after another takes a dive, the question remains: Why not Trump?

The charges levelled against him emerged in the supercharged thick of the 2016 campaign, when there was so much noise and chaos that they were just another episode for gobsmacked voters to try to absorb — or tune out. "When you have a Mount Everest of allegations, any particular allegation is very hard to get traction on," says political psychologist Stanley Renshon.

And Trump's unconventional candidacy created an entirely different set of rules.

"Trump is immune to the laws of political physics because it's not his job to be a politician, it's his job to burn down the system," says Eric Dezenhall, a crisis management expert in Washington.

Now Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, accused of assaulting teenage girls when he was in his 30s, is waving that same alternative rulebook.

As for Trump, the president who rarely sits out a feeding frenzy is selectively aiming his Twitter guns at those under scrutiny.

He quickly unloaded on Democrat Al Franken after the Minnesota senator was accused Thursday of forcibly kissing and groping a Fox TV sports correspondent, now a Los Angeles radio anchor, during a 2006 USO tour.

Yet Trump has been largely mum as Washington Republicans try to figure out what to do about Moore. McConnell and company have zero interest in welcoming an accused child molester to their ranks nor in seeing their slim 52-48 Senate majority grow even thinner should Moore lose to Democrat Doug Jones in a special election Dec. 12.

Trump did support moves by the national Republican Party to cut off money for Moore. But he hasn't said whether he still backs Moore's candidacy.

Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders, pressed repeatedly on the matter this week, would say only that Trump "thinks that the people of Alabama should make the decision on who their next senator should be."

As for the allegations against Moore, Sanders said Trump finds them "very troubling."

The sexual assault drama is playing out as a painful sequel for Leeds and other women who came forward during the 2016 presidential campaign to accuse Trump of harassment and more — only to see him elected president anyway.

Even in the current charged environment, when every new allegation can produce screaming headlines, Trump may well be able to go his own way — and take a hands-off approach to Moore.



Phallic flyover stunt

A naval pilot showed off questionable creative flair, Thursday, in the sky above Omak, Wash.

Residents of Okanogan County witnessed a phallic air show as the pilot drew a massive penis.

“So I guess someone had enough money and time to draw a dick in the sky with an airplane today,” James Farmer wrote on Twitter.

Spokane's KREM 2 TV news reported Whidbey Island Naval Air Station confirmed one of its pilots was responsible for the phallus in the sky.

"The navy holds its aircrew to the highest standards, and we find this absolutely unacceptable, of zero training value and we are holding the crew accountable,” a navy official told the station.

While some were upset about the image, others were impressed.

“The most monumental thing to happen in Omak,” wrote Anahi Torres on Twitter. “A penis in the sky.”



Impatience with Mugabe

Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe made his first public appearance since the military put him under house arrest this week, even as the military announced "significant progress" on talks for his departure and arrested some of his allies, and branches of the ruling party began to pass no-confidence votes in the world's oldest head of state.

Mugabe's appearance at a pomp-filled graduation ceremony, to polite applause, came during an extraordinary series of negotiations with regional leaders over his departure after 37 years in power.

Zimbabwe's military is taking pains to show respect for the 93-year-old leader by referring to him as the president and the commander-in-chief.

But some in the ruling ZANU-PF party signalled they were getting impatient with Mugabe, with party branches passing no-confidence votes in the provinces of Mashonaland East and Manicaland. Others among the country's 10 provinces, including Midlands, Masvingo and Harare, were said to be following suit.

Parliament is expected to resume sitting on Tuesday. It is possible that the ZANU-PF could use party procedures to impeach Mugabe with the support of opposition lawmakers.

Mugabe has asked for "a few more days, a few more months," the chairman of the influential war veterans' association in Zimbabwe told reporters.

Chris Mutsvangwa, an ally of the recently fired Vice-President Emmerson Mnangagwa who is expected to lead any new government, said that "between now and tomorrow" they will warn Mugabe that the game is over. "If he doesn't leave, we will settle the scores tomorrow."

Headlines in some local newspapers declared the Mugabe era over. "Dawn of a new era," one said. "Mugabe remembered for brutal 37-year rule," said another.



$30,400 drunk driving fine

A 22-year-old Norwegian student has been handed a 250,000-kroner ($30,400) fine for drunken driving — but can still count herself lucky.

Katharina G. Andresen is reportedly Norway's richest woman, with a fortune estimated by Forbes at $1.23 billion.

Fines for drunken driving in Norway are based on the defendant's income. Newspaper Finansavisen reported that Oslo City Court said the penalty could have been up to 40 million kroner ($4.9 million) if based on Andresen's assets, but they "have not yielded any dividend yet" and she has no fixed income. The court did increase the fine because of her estimated wealth, however.

Andresen was also banned from driving for 13 months.

Andresen's father gave her a 42-per cent share in the family-owned investment company in 2007, leading Forbes to declare her the world's second-youngest billionaire.



Venus Williams robbed

Burglars hit tennis star Venus Williams' Florida home, stealing $400,000 worth of goods while she was at the U.S. Open, police said Thursday.

The burglary happened between Sept. 1 and 5 at Williams' 10,000-square-foot home, which is in a well-to-do gated community, Palm Beach Gardens police said in a statement. Police blacked out from their report what was stolen. No arrests have been made.

Palm Beach County property records show Williams and her sister Serena bought the home new in 2000. It is now valued at $2.3 million.

In June, Williams was involved in a traffic accident near her home that killed a passenger in the other car. Police have said the accident investigation remains open, and she is being sued by the dead man's estate. 

Williams, 37, has had one of her best recent years on the court, finishing second at both Wimbledon and the Australian Open and reaching the semi-finals at the U.S. Open.

Williams has seven career Grand Slam titles and career on-court earnings of nearly $40 million. 



Franken faces ethics probe

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken faces a storm of criticism and a likely ethics investigation after a Los Angeles radio anchor accused him Thursday of forcibly kissing her and groping her during a 2006 USO tour. He is the first member of Congress caught up in the recent wave of allegations of sexual abuse and inappropriate behaviour.

Franken apologized, but the criticism only grew through the day. Fellow Democrats swiftly condemned his actions, mindful of the current climate as well as the prospect of political blowback.

Republicans, still forced to answer for the multiple allegations facing Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, joined in pressing for an investigation. Franken said he would welcome it.

Leeann Tweeden posted her allegations, including a photo of Franken and her, on the website of KABC, where she works as a news anchor for a morning radio show. The photo shows Franken posing in a joking manner, smiling at the camera with his hands on her chest as she naps wearing a flak vest aboard a military plane. Both had been performing for military personnel in Afghanistan two years before the one-time "Saturday Night Live" comedian was elected to the Senate.

Tweeden said Thursday that before an earlier show Franken had persisted in rehearsing a kiss and "aggressively stuck his tongue in my mouth." Now, she said, "every time I hear his voice or see his face, I am angry." She's angry with herself, too, she said, for not speaking out at the time "but I didn't want to rock the boat."

Franken, 66, is the latest public figure to be caught in the deluge of revelations of sexual harassment and misconduct that have crushed careers, ruined reputations and prompted criminal investigations in Hollywood, business and beyond. The swift rebukes from both Republican and Democratic lawmakers suggest that momentum from the online #Metoo movement has begun to spur a culture shift on Capitol Hill, where current and former staffers say misogynistic and predatory behaviour has long been an open secret.

In a statement Thursday, Franken apologized to Tweeden and his constituents while maintaining that he remembered the rehearsal differently. Tweeden said she accepted his apology.

"Coming from the world of comedy, I've told and written a lot of jokes that I once thought were funny but later came to realize were just plain offensive," Franken wrote.



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