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Campus Life  

Credit Union invests in next generation

SDCUA local financial institution has stepped forward with an inspiring gift that will yield great returns for families in the South Okanagan. 

The Summerland & District Credit Union (SDCU) announced a pledge of $5,000 to Little Learners Academy, the new child care centre at Okanagan College’s Penticton campus. 

A fixture in the Okanagan since 1944, SDCU has helped individuals buy their first car or home, start a new business, send themselves and their children to college, and save for their futures. Their contribution to the child care centre’s fundraising campaign will support another of life’s firsts – a solid start to education for young learners.

“A child care centre right on campus is a brilliant idea - both for students and the greater community,” says Kelly Marshall, CEO of SDCU, who says it is easy to get behind a project that clearly addresses a community need.

“People helping people is the essence of what we do,” he explains. “Our members aren’t account numbers, they are people we know – they are parents, students, and neighbours.  

“The relationships we build with our members gives us insight into the needs of the region. We see a demand for high quality child care in the South Okanagan and feel the new centre will be a community asset for years to come.”

The credit union has been a long-time investor in students at Okanagan College, with their philanthropic history dating back to 1989. In 2008, they established the Credit Union Foundation of BC – Summerland Credit Union Endowment, an annual bursary presented to a deserving student at the Penticton campus.

"Our sincere thanks goes out to the Summerland & District Credit Union for their support of our students and our growing campus," says Eric Corneau, Okanagan College Regional Dean South Okanagan-Similkameen. "Their gift will help to build stronger families and community in the region, as well as empower parents to pursue the education and careers they desire."

SDCU is a single branch, independent credit union serving Summerland and the surrounding area. With members across Canada and the world, Marshall notes the donation to the Penticton child care centre aligns with the company’s commitment to support initiatives that benefit all residents in the region.

“Our reach and membership goes beyond Summerland and we want to give back to the communities that support us,” adds Marshall. “We are excited to be part of a development that will fulfill the needs of so many families in the South Okanagan.”  

The new Little Learners Academy opened in September and is operated through a partnership between Okanagan College and the Penticton and District Community Resources Society (PDCRS). Registration is open to families in the South Okanagan, including College students and employees.

To make a donation or learn more about the innovative project, visit okanagan.bc.ca/give.

 



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Forests are the key to fresh water

Forests are the key to fresh water

UBC research shows both forest vegetation and climate change have an impact on water supply

Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on global water resources as climate change.

UBC Okanagan Earth, Environmental and Geographic Sciences Professor Adam Wei, PhD candidate Qiang Li and researchers from the Chinese Academy of Forestry recently published a study examining the impacts of how changes in forest vegetation effect water supplies. Using several decades worth of data, their work examined how water resources are responsive to vegetation ground cover and climate change.

“As we urbanize land and continue to convert forests for other uses, our water regimes change,” says Wei. “We end up with the systems we do not design for, and entire watersheds are being affected.”

Forested areas are critically important water resources, explains Li. But as land is developed or the green vegetation is destroyed, watersheds are irreversibly damaged.

“We need to recognize the importance of vegetation,” says Li. “Forest cover is an important element and we need to keep this in mind for the future. Scientists talk about how climate change affects water when they measure global warming. We’re suggesting they also need to keep an eye on forest vegetation. It’s a key indicator of the health of our water resources.”

Forests cover more than 30 per cent of the world’s land surface and Li says about 21 per cent of the global population directly depends on these catchments for their water supply. Using computer modelling, the researchers examined historical data from 2000 to 2011. They looked at changes in land vegetation and annual water yield in boreal and tropical forests in locations such as British Columbia, Canada, Russia, Brazil, Finland and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Along with development, intensive forest logging, fire, and insect infestation were reasons for forest and ground vegetation loss.

“Our simulations show that the average global alteration in annual water flow due to vegetation change is as high as 31 per cent. Our results also show that on average, in 51 per cent of the study area, vegetation change and climate change operate together and can lead to either fewer water resources, meaning higher chances of drought, or an increase in water supply and higher chances of devastating floods.”

These findings have far-reaching implications for assessing and managing future global water resources, says Wei.

“Our watersheds and landscapes are experiencing significant pressures from vegetation or land cover change and climate change,” he adds. “Because vegetation change and climate change play a similar role in water resources change, ignoring either one will likely lead to an incomplete understanding and ineffective management of our future water resources, particularly for the regions where intensive forest change occurs.”

Future water resource assessment must, he says, consider both climate and vegetation or land cover change, and our management paradigm should be shifted from “adapting and mitigating climate change impacts” to “managing both climate and land cover change together.”

This research was recently published in Global Change Biology and was partially funded by grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Research Program for Public-welfare Forestry and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

UBC researchers (from left to right) Abby Yang, Associate Professor Adam Wei, Krysta Giles-Hansen and Qiang Li discuss the role forest vegetation plays while monitoring water resources.

UBC researchers (from left to right) Abby Wang, Professor Adam Wei, Krysta Giles-Hansen and Qiang Li discuss the role forest vegetation plays while monitoring water resources.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



Kelowna Secondary School student wins tuition at Okanagan College

Okanagan College Media Release

Gillett and Lambert CF tuition winner Dec 2017A Grade 12 student attended Okanagan College’s 36th annual Career Fair to learn more about post-secondary education and got more than expected after winning the event’s grand prize, a $2,500 tuition credit.

Kelowna Secondary School (K.S.S.) student Braeden Lambert has always had a passion for business and went to the Fair on Nov. 5 to research the College’s Bachelor of Business degree program.

“I want to open my own business one day,” says Lambert. “That’s why I went to Career Fair, to check out the program and its possibilities. I’ve heard good things about the College and the business school and really liked what I saw, so I decided to apply for it on the spot.”

The College’s Career Fair is one of the Interior’s longest running fairs and attracted hundreds of prospective students this year. Attendees were treated to post-secondary preparatory seminars, tours, activities, program information and draw prizes. Anyone who applied for a program at the Fair was entered to win the grand prize.

“It totally took me by surprise when I got the phone call telling me I won the tuition money – I felt like I won the lottery or something,” says Lambert. “It’s like a weight has been lifted from my shoulders because I don’t have to stress as much about my job or how I’ll pay for tuition – I can just focus on my school now.”

Lambert spends his free time enjoying the four-season Okanagan lifestyle and feels fortunate to be able to live at home while studying at the College.

“The fact that I can stay home and save money while getting a quality education is such an amazing opportunity that I know most don’t get,” says Lambert. “Also, the College is so familiar to me which makes moving into post-secondary much more comfortable.”

Last year more than 1,550 full-time equivalent students were enrolled in the Okanagan School of Business.

“This is an exciting time to study business in the Okanagan,” says Bill Gillett, Dean of the Okanagan School of Business. “With the rising tech sector and a strong climate for entrepreneurialism, the region has a wealth of strong business leaders and is filled with opportunities for success.”

Lambert is currently completing his final year at K.S.S. and will start classes at the College in September 2018. 

 



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New year brings new part-time viticulture courses to OC

Okanagan College Media Release

Vit Nov2017While wine lovers will have to wait months – if not years – to sip and savour 2018 Okanagan vintages, 2018 is poised to be a very good year right from the start for anyone looking to learn the art and science of grape growing in the region.

Three new part-time viticulture courses starting in January at Okanagan College’s Penticton campus will offer students a flexible way to gain the skills and knowledge needed to work in or manage a commercial vineyard. Previously, the courses have only been available to students enrolled in the full-time Viticulture Technician diploma program.

“By allowing students to take individual courses on a part-time basis, we aim to provide a more convenient means to explore this exciting field of study,” explains Jonathan Rouse, the College’s Director of Food, Wine and Tourism. “It will allow individuals, both experienced and new to viticulture, an opportunity to further develop a range of skills and knowledge that aligns with the needs of the wine industry.”

The courses will run Jan. 3 – April 26, 2018 and span three key cornerstones of viticulture – vineyard health and nutrition, irrigation and trellis systems and vineyard operations. Students can expect a blend of classroom instruction and practical experience at local vineyards.Vit Students Nov2017

“Beyond having an understanding of the scientific principles of grape growing, there is a great deal of practical knowledge up-and-coming viticulturists need to have to find employment and be an asset in the vineyard,” explains Rouse.

The courses were developed as part of the College’s new Viticulture Technician diploma program that launched in September. The two-year pilot program was made possible with funding from both the federal and provincial governments through labour market agreements, and developed in partnership with the B.C. Wine Grape Council.

“In designing these courses, we worked closely with local vineyard managers, winemakers and proprietors to better understand the talent they need to ensure we continue to produce quality grapes in the Okanagan."

In addition to budding grape growers and future winemakers, the coursework may also be an asset to professionals in other areas of the wine industry, notes Rouse.

“I can see these courses appealing to individuals working in wine sales and marketing,” he says. “Students will come away with a greater depth of knowledge of the entire process from grape to glass.”

More information about the courses is available at www.okanagan.bc.ca/vittech

 




UBC Okanagan researchers discover neurotoxin in Lake Winnipeg

Stephanie Bishop, graduate student in chemistry at UBC Okanagan, holds a sample from Lake Winnipeg

Stephanie Bishop, a graduate student in chemistry at UBC Okanagan, holds a sample from Lake Winnipeg.

Toxin found in Cyanobacteria during periods of bloom

A new study from UBC’s Okanagan campus has found that BMAA—a toxin linked to several neurodegenerative diseases—is present in high concentrations during cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Winnipeg.

“Cyanobacteria blooms have become increasingly common in Lake Winnipeg since the 1990s,” says Susan Murch, associate professor of chemistry at UBC Okanagan and study lead author. “These bacteria have also been known to produce BMAA under the right conditions and we wanted to establish whether this could be happening in one of Canada’s largest and most important freshwater lakes.”

Murch says BMAA has been associated with everything from Alzheimer’s to ALS and can have serious public health implications if it permeates food and water supplies.

“It’s very difficult to detect BMAA directly in water samples using current methods,” says Stephanie Bishop, a graduate student in chemistry at UBC Okanagan and study co-author. “We decided to look for its presence in the cyanobacteria itself using samples collected from across the lake with the help of our partners from the Lake Winnipeg Research Consortium.”

Murch and Bishop analyzed samples collected in July and September of 2016 and found that BMAA was present in highest concentrations in the areas of the bloom that are impacted by pollution and farming.

“Agricultural and human activities along with factors like climate change are very likely behind the increased size and frequency of blooms,” Murch adds. “We now know that with these blooms comes the very real risk of increased exposure to BMAA and the public health impacts that follow.”

She warns that cyanobacterial blooms are not isolated to Lake Winnipeg and that she would expect to see similar results in other freshwater lakes.

“We’re seeing a greater number of blooms in lakes in both the US and Canada. Especially in the Great Lakes region,” she says. “It wouldn’t surprise me to see BMAA in cyanobacteria from lakes that serve a huge number of people.”

“We hope that an increased awareness of risks of BMAA along with a better understanding of the human impacts on algal blooms will help us better manage the potential consequences to public health.”

Susan Murch is an associate professor of chemistry at UBC Okanagan.

Susan Much is an associate professor of chemistry at UBC Okanagan.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



Penticton couple helps feed the minds of young learners

Okanagan College Media Release

A pair of former educators are supporting the next generation of students as they take their first steps into a formal learning environment.

Longtime advocates of Okanagan College, Allan and Evelyn Markin have pledged $2,500 to the new Little Learners Academy at the Penticton campus.Evelyn and Allan Markin Nov 2017

The need for the child care centre has been on the couple’s radar since Allan Markin was Campus Principal at the College more than 15 years ago.

“I was involved in some of the early conversations where we recognized there were mature students and College employees with children,” explains Markin. “The need for child care was acute and is still an obstacle for parents in the region.”

During his time working at the campus (1988-2003), Markin saw firsthand the sacrifices parents made for their children, often at the expense of pursuing their own educational goals.  

“It’s wonderful to see the centre develop from an idea to become a reality, and to see families in Penticton already benefitting from it,” he adds.

Little Learners opened in September and is operated through a partnership between Okanagan College and the Penticton and District Community Resources Society (PDCRS). Registration is open to College students and employees, as well as families in the South Okanagan, which the Markins see as part of the College’s broader role in the community.

“Affordable, accessible child care is essential to the educational system and a healthy society,” Markin notes. “Evelyn and I have always been big believers that we all have a responsibility to help build up our community to make it better.”

The Markins’ altruism doesn’t stop at the edge of the campus. Both are well known for championing many educational, fundraising and community-based initiatives in the Penticton area. Their soft spot for youth in need has also led them to support and fundraise for a children’s orphanage and art school in Russia, including travelling overseas to lend a hand in person.

According to Evelyn Markin, another passion of the couple’s is cooking, which inspired them to support one of the kitchen spaces at Little Learners. As a former elementary school teacher, she understands the influence nutrition and healthy eating has on a student’s ability to learn and process information.

“You need to feed the mind to learn well,” she remarks. “Nutrition has an impact on activity levels, social interaction and brain function, especially in early childhood development. The educational foundation Little Learners provides will help prepare children for success when they face more difficult work in elementary school and afterwards.”

The Markins’ spirit of philanthropy has spread through their family to their daughter Allison, who also contributed to the fundraising campaign earlier this year in honour of her parents.

“It’s deeply inspiring to see the Markins’ dedication to helping children both in our region and across the globe,” says campaign chair Mary Ellen Heidt, who also sits on the College’s Regional Advisory Committee. “They have a long history of involvement with the campus and we thank them for this generous gift, and for continuing to be champions of education for learners of all ages.”

To make a donation or learn more about the innovative project, visit okanagan.bc.ca/give.

 




UBC announces $100-million fundraising campaign to help students

UBC Okanagan is embarking on the largest fundraising campaign for students in its 12-year history. The Blue & Gold Campaign for Students aims to raise $100 million across both UBC campuses over three years to give promising students access to a life-changing education.

“Donors in the Okanagan have already played a crucial role in building our campus and shaping what it is today,” says Deborah Buszard, Deputy Vice-chancellor and Principal of UBC’s Okanagan campus. “We are equally committed to building greater supports for students to ensure the best and the brightest from near and far have access to a world-class education right here in the Okanagan, regardless of financial circumstances.”

The Blue & Gold Campaign for Students will support a range of student awards, including scholarships, bursaries, and experiential learning opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students at the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses. The awards will support students in need, students from under-represented communities, and leadership-based awards.

Tushar Dave, a recipient of the Deepak Binning Foundation Community Builder Scholarship and now a third-year undergraduate in medical biochemistry and molecular biology at UBC Okanagan, is one student who is benefitting from a UBC donor-funded award.

“The biggest factor for me was getting a UBC education here at home. I live in Kelowna and it is wonderful for me to have a UBC world-class education at my doorstep” said Dave. “Scholarships allow me to focus on what matters most: my studies. It’s important to continue supporting students so that we can give back to our communities. So that we can go to work and actually make a change in the world.”

Haley Seven Deers, a third-year history and anthropology student at UBC Okanagan, is another.

“These awards are truly life-changing for students,” said Seven Deers, who received a UBC Okanagan Aboriginal Entrance Award. “Every bit, no matter how small or large that you donate is going to have a huge impact on people’s lives. And not just on the students, but on all the people they will affect later in their careers. It’s such a beautiful thing that has such a far-reaching impact within society.”

UBC is providing matching funds of up to $5 million for new endowed donations to select Blue & Gold campaign priorities, which include bursaries and renewable entrance awards for students with high academic standing, known as Presidential Scholars, as well as for outstanding students recognized for their achievement and leadership who demonstrate financial need.

The campaign will also focus on the graduate student experience including opportunities to pursue research in collaboration with community partners and organizations to provide real-life applications for public benefit.

“The student awards that I have received have really helped me to focus my time and energy on engaging with communities in a meaningful way and also to focus on field work,” said Kelsey Copes-Gerbitz, a graduate student who studies wildfires at UBC in Vancouver. “My dream for the future is to help enable communities to co-exist with wildfire. Fire isn’t going away, but our people and our landscapes can be more resilient to fire and learn how to co-exist with it better.”

For information about the Blue & Gold Campaign for Students, visit: support.ubc.ca/blueandgold

UBC's Blue and Gold fundraising campaign for students kicked-off at the university on November 27 to a capacity-crowd.

UBC's Blue and Gold fundraising campaign for students kicked-off at the university on November 27 to a capacity crowd.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



Jazz Aviation helps Okanagan College students’ careers take flight

Okanagan College Media Release

Miglani_Jazz Nov 2017Two Okanagan College students are getting a remarkable opportunity to jump start their careers as commercial pilots with major Canadian airline Jazz Aviation LP (Jazz).

Each year two students in the College’s Commercial Aviation program are recognized by Jazz for their educational achievements, safety and professionalism. The airline awards each winning student with a $3,000 scholarship and enrolment in the Jazz Aviation Pathways Program (Jazz APP) which guarantees the student an interview with the company upon graduation.

“Being part of Jazz APP is something I’ve been working toward since I started this program,” says Paawan Miglani, OC commercial aviation student. “I’m graduating soon and knowing I have an interview with such a renowned airline is huge. Also, the scholarship money is a big help because it’s going straight into my training with simulator sessions, flights and ground school.”

Miglani was presented with the Safety, Professionalism and Diversity award and his classmate Aimee Wintle received the Safety and Professionalism award. Both Miglani and Wintle excelled on their Transport Canada written exams and industry flight tests and have a high grade point average.

“It was a huge honour to win this award, it makes me feel like all of my hard work has paid off,” says Wintle. “The scholarship portion helps pay for tuition costs and whether I’m successful or not, the interview is one of the biggest benefits of this award.”Wintle_Jazz Nov 2017

Jazz has been collaborating with accredited colleges nationwide for a decade and takes a deep responsibility to mentor future generations of aviators and is dedicated to hiring Canada’s best and brightest youth.

“Jazz is committed to creating a strong future for the pilot profession in Canada and we’re proud to support the education of top aviation students like Aimee and Paawan,” said Peter Batten, Senior Chief Pilot, Line Operations for Jazz. “Safety and professionalism are paramount to success as a commercial pilot and it’s wonderful to see such deserving recipients from the College.”

Okanagan College is one of the first aviation schools in Western Canada to team up with the Jazz APP. Since the program launched at the College in early 2016, many graduating students have gone on to accept pilot positions at Jazz.

Last year OC student Chris McCann won the Jazz APP scholarship and upon graduation, successfully interviewed with the airline.

“Jazz flew me to Vancouver for an interview shortly after I graduated and then flew me to Toronto for a second interview,” says McCann. “I found out pretty quickly I was hired as a commercial pilot and I’ve already started training.”

McCann is currently in Toronto and just began a two-week training program. Upon completion, he will be sent to another city to complete an additional six weeks of training before being assigned a home base. 

 




UBC study finds family-friendly overpasses are needed to help grizzly bears

A screen shot from Banff’s Temple overpass shows a female grizzly escorting her cubs across the Trans-Canada Highway.

A screenshot from Banff’s Temple overpass shows a female grizzly escorting her cubs across the Trans-Canada Highway.

Design of wildlife road crossings is crucial for protecting grizzlies

Researchers have determined how female grizzly bears keep their cubs safe while crossing the Trans-Canada Highway.

Adam Ford, Canada Research Chair in Wildlife Restoration Ecology at UBC’s Okanagan campus, along with Montana State University’s Tony Clevenger, studied the travel patterns of grizzlies in Banff National Park between 1997 and 2014. In most cases, a mother bear travelling with cubs opted to use a wildlife overpass instead of a tunnel to cross the highway.

“We used data from Canada’s longest and most detailed study of road-wildlife interactions,” explains Ford, an assistant professor of biology. “We found that grizzly bear females and cubs preferred to use overpasses to cross the highway.”

During the 17-year study period, bears not travelling in these family groups used both underpasses and overpasses.

“You can’t just build a tunnel under a highway and expect to conserve bears,” says Ford. “Our work shows that the design of structures used to get bears across the road matters for reconnecting grizzly bear populations.”

The study looked at five different wildlife crossing structure designs distributed across 44 sites along a 100-km stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway. The structures are purpose-built bridges or tunnels to facilitate the safe movement of animals across roads. Tracking and motion-triggered cameras were used to monitor grizzly bear movement and Ford says all grizzly bears selected larger and more open structures like overpasses and open-span bridges, compared to tunnels and box culverts.

“Since adult females and cubs drive population growth, this research tells us that overpasses are needed to protect bears in roaded areas,” says Ford.

The study also documents the most cost-effective means to design highway mitigation. A common concern in conservation is how to allocate funding to bring the most effective gains for biodiversity. The researchers estimated the cost-effectiveness of structure designs and were surprised by the result.

“When we look at the population as a whole, there were a lot of passages made by males in box culverts, which is the cheapest type of structure to build,” explains Clevenger, stressing that a diversity of wildlife crossing structure designs along a highway is essential.

“It’s important to reduce the chances of adult males encountering cubs since the males will kill young bears,” Clevenger adds. “Creating both ‘bachelor’ and ‘family’-friendly designs will further help bear populations grow.”

This peer-reviewed study was published online this week in the Wildlife Society Bulletin.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world. For more visit ok.ubc.ca.



Sheet metal career paths on display at open house

Okanagan College Media Release

The need for skilled Sheet Metal Workers locally and across B.C. has prompted Okanagan College to open the doors to one of its newest shops so potential students can test-drive the trade this fall.Sheet Metal Nov 2017

“There is a huge need for sheet metal workers right now,” says Brad Oliver, Chair of Mechanical Building Trades at the College. “We can’t train them fast enough to meet the demand locally, and our grads are finding work all over the province, Alberta and up north. We are constantly hearing from industry that they are struggling to find enough skilled workers.”

The College is hosting a free public information night on Tuesday, Nov. 28 from 6-8 p.m. in the Atrium of the Trades Complex. Students will have a chance to explore the cutting-edge new Sheet Metal shop and can sign up to be a student for a day this fall.

“It’s a great opportunity for people who are considering the trade to understand how the training works and get a sense of what the job opportunities and career paths are like,” notes Oliver, who points out that sheet metal may appeal to potential students looking to stay in – or move to – the Okanagan.

“This trade sometimes flies under the radar in people’s minds, but sheet metal is everywhere you look – homes, offices, schools, hospitals, restaurants – so there is endless work if you’re skilled in fabricating, installing or servicing ducts or anything with a sheet metal component.

“It’s a Red Seal trade, which means your ticket will be recognized across the country,” explains Oliver. “But what I think what is attractive about this trade for students is the potential to train here, and find stable work locally if they want to stay here.”

Upon completion of the 20-week Foundation program, students receive credit for Level 1 Technical Training and 350 work-based hours toward their apprenticeship. They can then choose to continue on to complete all four levels of their apprenticeship training in Kelowna, all while working and gaining on-the-job experience.

“The apprentice works in industry and attends school for six weeks each year,” explains Oliver. “If they complete all four levels, they’ll have the full spectrum of training required to become a qualified Sheet Metal Journeyperson.”

A recent labour market sweep by BC Business predicted there will be call for 900 more Sheet Metal Workers in B.C. over the next eight years. Sheet Metal Workers made the magazine’s list of 50 high paying jobs in the province, earning an average of $31/hr.

The next intake of the Sheet Metal Worker Foundation program starts in April. More information about the program and the Nov. 28 information night is available at Okanagan.bc.ca/mbt

 




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